Information

USS Bremerton (CA-130), 14 February 1952


USS Bremerton (CA-130), 14 February 1952

This picture shows us the Baltimore class heavy cruiser USS Bremerton (CA-130) at sea on 14 February 1952, probably during one of her tours of duty off Korea.


USS Bremerton (CA-130), 14 February 1952 - History


Korean War Service [ edit ]

Bremerton was recommissioned 23 November 1951. After refresher training she joined the 7th Fleet for her first cruise of the Korean War zone. Her guns blasted enemy lines at Wonsan, Kojo, Chongjin, and Changjon Hang, Korea. On 13 September 1952 she was relieved and returned to Long Beach.

Seven months were devoted to overhaul, drills, and gunnery exercises, and then on 5 April 1953 Bremerton again departed Long Beach for a tour with the 7th Fleet. Upon joining TF㻍 her guns pounded enemy installations, troops, and railroads in Korea.

Completing this tour in November 1953, Bremerton returned to Long Beach and commenced a shipyard overhaul. With overhaul completed, she conducted extensive training and then departed for another tour of the Western Pacific 14 May 1954. On 4 April 1954 Commander Will P. Starnes assumed duties as Executive Officer and on 17 October 1954 Bremerton returned to Long Beach and was granted a thirty-day rest before continuing drills and gunnery exercises off Southern California coast.


Korean War Service

Bremerton was recommissioned 23 November 1951. After refresher training she joined the 7th Fleet for her first cruise of the Korean War zone. Her guns blasted enemy lines at Wonsan, Kojo, Chongjin, and Changjon Hang, Korea. On 13 September 1952 she was relieved and returned to Long Beach.

Seven months were devoted to overhaul, drills, and gunnery exercises, and then on 5 April 1953 Bremerton again departed Long Beach for a tour with the 7th Fleet. Upon joining TF㻍 her guns pounded enemy installations, troops, and railroads in Korea.

Completing this tour in November 1953, Bremerton returned to Long Beach and commenced a shipyard overhaul. With overhaul completed, she conducted extensive training and then departed for another tour of the Western Pacific 14 May 1954. On 4 April 1954 Commander Will P. Starnes assumed duties as Executive Officer and on 17 October 1954 Bremerton returned to Long Beach and was granted a thirty day rest before continuing drills and gunnery exercises off Southern California coast.


USS Bremerton (CA-130), 14 February 1952 - History

USS FRED T. BERRY DD/DDE 858
SHIP'S HISTORY
Compiled by Carl Merrill


photo courtesy of CDR Berry's
grandson, Fred Berry
(Click for larger image)


Original configuration 1945
(Click for larger image)

The U.S.S. FRED T. BERRY (DD-858) was built by the Bethlehem Steel Co., San Pedro , California with her keel being laid on 16 July 1944. The ship was named after CDR. Fred Thomas Berry, USN, who was killed at sea in the crash of the U.S. Airship AKRON (ZRS-4) on 4 April 1933. Born on 23 November 1887, CDR. Berry graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in June 1910.

The FRED T.BERRY (DD-858) sailed from San Diego to San Francisco on 11 July 1945. Arriving in San Francisco , she was granted availability at the General Engineering and Dry-dock Co. from July 16 through August 29, 1945. On 6 August, CDR. N. J. Frank, USN, was relieved of command by CDR. C. C. Coley, USN. August 29 saw BERRY steaming for Pearl Harbor . Leaving Pearl Harbor in the company of U.S.S. GURKE (DD-783) on 20 October 1945, BERRY steamed toward Tokyo Bay . Upon arrival, both ships were assigned to the Fifth Fleet for duty.

On 15 November 1945, she escorted U.S.S. ROTANIA (AKA-108) and the U.S.S. BAYFIELD (APA -33) to Jinsen , Korea and returned to Nagoya , Japan on 24 November 1945. On 5 December, BERRY took the Flag aboard and, in the company of U.S.S. PIERCE (DD-753), escorted U.S.S. BOSTON (CA-69) from Wakayama to Nagoya , Japan . On 2 January 1946, Flag departed and BERRY sailed to Tsingtao, China (According to the FTB Website, History Addenda, shows the personal logbook of Clarence Hood of the “Early activities of the Berry”, written by Al Truman and Clarence Hood, the Berry sank a Junk at the coordinates 38.09 North Latitude by 121.51 East Longitude on January 22,1946). Shortly after her arrival in Tsingtao, she departed for Jinsen , Korea to escort the U.S.S. BREMERTON (CA-130) back to Tsingtao . On 7 February BERRY departed to escort U.S.S. COLUMBUS (CA-74) to Shanghai . On 19 February BERRY , along with U.S.S. McCAFFERY (DD-860), U.S.S. HARWOOD (DD-861) and U.S.S. CATFISH (SS-339), cruised in the area before returning to Tsingtao . She subsequently operated in the area with other ships of the Pacific Fleet before leaving on 31 March to escort the U.S.S.GENERAL BUTNER (AP-113) to Taku , China .

The BERRY 's whereabouts cannot be documented from April until the fall of 1946 when she departed San Diego for the Asiatic Station. During this cruise she trained with carriers in Hawaiian waters and completed a tour of occupation duty in the Far East where she visited Shanghai , China , Korea , Japan , Okinawa and Formosa . Returning to the States again on 21 February 1947, BERRY went into Bremerton Navy Yard for overhaul in May. See note from Vinne Crimaudo of the USS Norris at the end of this article!

In August, 1947, the BERRY was again assigned duty in the Western Pacific and, following training operations, departed for the Asiatic Station on 2 December. After visiting China , Hong Kong, Shanghai , Japan and Okinawa, the ship returned to San Diego on 7 August 1948.

Between 5 January and 15 May 1949, BERRY was at U.S. Naval Shipyard, Mare Island, California where she was converted to an anti-submarine warfare ship following the installation of extra underwater sound equipment and a hedgehog battery in place of Number 2 five-inch gun mount. Following completion of the overhaul, the ship conducted training exercises in the San Diego area before being designated to join the Atlantic Fleet. The ship departed San Diego on 25 August 1949 and arrived in Newport , Rhode Island on 11 September 1949. As a unit of the U. S. Atlantic Fleet, the ship participated in Second Fleet Cold Weather Operations in the Davis Straits, in special ASW exercises under COLD.DEVFOR and PROTEX and CARIDEX fleet exercises while visiting New York City , Key West , Florida and Bermuda .

On 4 March 1950 BERRY was reclassified as an Escort Destroyer and, shortly after the outbreak of hostilities in Korea , was ordered to temporary duty in the Mediterranean . She departed Newport on 5 July 1950, beginning, what was to be an around-the-world tour of duty. After a brief stop in Norfolk , Virginia , the ship made the Atlantic crossing to Gibraltar and reported to the Sixth Fleet. Upon arrival at Piraeus , Greece , the BERRY was unexpectedly ordered to the Far East . In the latter part of July, she proceeded eastward to Port Said , Egypt and passed through the Suez Canal and Red Sea . The ship stopped at Columbo , Ceylon before joining the Seventh Fleet in the Pacific Theater.

Between September and October, the ship was assigned to Formosa Patrol. From the beginning of November until 5 February 1951, the ship operated with Task Force 77 off the coast of Korea in support of the United Nations Ground Forces. In December the ship accompanied the U.S.S. MISSOURI (BB-63) on one of her trips to Hungnam to assist in the evacuation on the Northern area.

In February of 1951, the BERRY was detached from the Seventh Fleet and proceeded to Newport , Rhode Island via the Panama Canal . After entering the Boston Naval Shipyard, the ship departed in July and completed refresher training at Guantanamo Bay , Cuba where it participated in LAMFLEX, CONVEX and ASDEX. (Webmaster's Note: It is assumed that the BERRY joined DESRON 24 at this time. Other ships in DESRON 24 were: U.S.S. LLOYD THOMAS [DDE-764], U.S.S. KEPPLER [DDE-765], U.S.S. NORRIS [DDE-859], U.S.S. McCAFFERY [DDE-860] and U.S.S. HARWOOD [DDE861].)

On 19 April 1952 the ship left Newport for a tour of duty in the Mediterranean, making visits to Tangiers, Marsielles, Golfe Juan, Naples and Gibralter before returning to Newport on 27 June. During the fall of 1952, the BERRY took part in NATO exercise MAINBRACE and visited Firth of Forth, Scotland and Southend-on-the-Sea , England .

On 3 February 1953, the ship departed Newport for another tour with the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean where it visited Golfe Juan, Naples and Bougie. During this period, the BERRY participated in exercise RENDEZVOUS, returning to the United States in April.


As configured 1955
(Click for larger image)


DESRON 24 at Guantanamo Bay
during Springboard 55
(Click for larger image)

During the summer of 1953, the ship underwent overhaul at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. Upon completion, it underwent refresher training at Guantanamo Bay , Cuba that ended on 30 October 1953.

On 5 January 1954 the BERRY left Newport on a third tour with the Sixth Fleet. While in the Mediterranean, stops were made at Lisbon , Palermo , Augusta Bay , Izmir , Phaleron, Naples , Taranto , Alicente, San Remo , Nice and Genoa . She returned to Newport on 26 May 1954.

In June of 1954, BERRY was ordered to report to COMANTISUBLANT and, as a unit of a Hunter Killer Group, she participated in LANTFLEX 54 AND Springboard 55. During this latter cruise, she visited Kingston , San Juan and St. Thomas , Virgin Islands .

BERRY departed Newport in early May 1955 and sailed to Lisbon , Portugal before returning in June, while participating in allied exercises enroute. The BERRY conducted Hunter Killer Operations in Narragansett Bay preceding the regular overhaul period at Brooklyn Naval Shipyard, which began on 10 January 1956. Leaving the yard in mid-April, she sailed for Guantanamo Bay for refresher training. Upon completion of refresher training, she returned to Newport on 20 June for a period of leave and upkeep prior to departure with Midshipmen Practice Squadron Cruise BAKER.

Leaving Newport on 7 July 1956, the BERRY embarked midshipmen in Norfolk , and on 9 July, sailed with other ships of the Midshipmen Practice Squadron. After eight weeks of training exercises and visits to Barcelona , Spain Greenock , Scotland and Guantanamo Bay , Cuba , she disembarked midshipmen at Norfolk and returned to Newport on 1 September 1956.

During the remainder of 1956, the ship conducted exercises in the vicinity of Narragansett Bay, and on 4 January 1957, sailed for South America for training exercises with the navies of Brazil , Argentina and Uruguay . After returning in March, the ship operated in the Newport area taking part in CARIBEX and SLAMEX before departing in August to join the Sixth Fleet.

Participating in fleet exercises and patrolling the Eastern Mediterranean occupied most of the first two months of the cruise however, the ship did visit Naples , Athens , Rhodes and other ports before returning to Newport in December.

In February and March of 1958, the BERRY visited San Juan , Puerto Rico and Ciudad Trujillo , Dominican Republic while participating in CARIBEX. In May, the ship entered Boston Naval Shipyard for a regular overhaul, which was completed in August. Upon completion of her refresher training at Guantanamo Bay , the ship, a member of DESRON 24 joined Task Group Bravo, which concentrated on the development of Hunter-Killer tactics, doctrine and equipment. As a member of Task Group Bravo, the ship participated in Hunter-Killer operations until June of 1959 when she took part in a Midshipman Practice Cruise. During this cruise, the ship visited Quebec and participated in RIPTIDE.

Upon completion of the Midshipman Practice Cruise, Task Group Bravo resumed anti-submarine operations off the East Coast of the United States . In February of 1960, BERRY participated in SPRINGBOARD and while in the Caribbean, visited San Juan , Puerto Rico and St. Thomas in the Virgin Islands before returning to Newport in March.

In June 1960, CDR. George H. Sharp relieved CDR. Melvin. R. Downes as Commanding Officer of the BERRY and shortly thereafter, BERRY departed on another Midshipman Practice Cruise to the Mediterranean. DESRON 24 escorted the aircraft carrier U.S.S. VALLEY FORGE (CVS-45) throughout the duration of this cruise and took part in various Sixth Fleet exercises and visited ports in Spain , France and Italy . On the return trip DESRON 24 joined the carrier U.S.S. FORRESTAL (CVA-59) to shadow a Russian convoy bound for Cuba . The ship returned to Newport on 30 August after debarking the midshipmen at Norfolk .

During the fall of 1960, Task Group Bravo resumed Hunter-Killer operations and participated in SLAMEX. In February and March of 1961, BERRY participated in LANTPHIBEX and Springboard while visiting San Juan , Puerto Rico and St. Thomas in the Virgin Islands . During the period 1960 and 1961 BERRY received the "A" for ASW excellence.


After FRAM II overhaul
(Click for larger image)

In March of 1961 the BERRY entered the Boston Naval Shipyard to undergo a seven month FRAM II overhaul. Upon completion of the overhaul, the BERRY returned to serve with Atlantic Fleet. From December 1961 to February 1962 she underwent refresher training at Guantanamo Bay . During March, she participated in evaluation of special anti-submarine tactics. Also in March, CDR. E. L. Burgess relieved CDR. Sharp as Commanding Officer of the BERRY .

In May of 1962, the BERRY participated in Project Mercury. While on Project Mercury she visited Bermuda for several days. In June she began another Midshipman Training Cruise, spending most of the ensuing six weeks in ASW exercises in the Atlantic .

At the beginning of fiscal year "62," the U.S.S. FRED T. BERRY was designated a General Purpose Destroyer.

In September of 1962, she departed for a seven-month tour of duty with the Sixth Fleet. Again with the Sixth Fleet, the ship participated in fleet exercises and patrol duty. During October and November she was on alert as a result of the Cuban Crisis that fall. In 1962 she visited Souba Bay , Izmir , Athens , Beaulieu, Salerno , Messina and Golfe Juan. Christmas was spent at Naples , and New Years was spent at La Spezia , Italy .

After a visit to Beirut , Lebanon , the BERRY passed through the Suez Canal on 17 January 1963 and reported to Commander, Middle East Force for duty. During the following six weeks she visited Nassawa , Ethiopia where she participated in ceremonies witnessed by Emperor Haile Salaasie as well as the British Protectorate of Aden, Bahrain, Ras Tannura Aabu Nu Air, and Jidda , Saudi Arabia . After being relieved of her Middle East duties the BERRY once again passed through the Suez Canal and, after an independent crossing of the Mediterranean and Atlantic Ocean, with stops at Rota , Spain and the Azores, returned to Newport on the 1 April 1963.

April and May were spent in Newport with the ship participating in a number of local operations. On the 4 June she embarked twenty-one midshipmen and joined Task Group 83.4 for seven weeks of ASW operations. During this cruise, the ship visited Bermuda and Halifax . While in Halifax , CDR. F. B. Shrake relieved CDR. Burgess as Commanding Officer. Under Commander Shrake, the BERRY returned to Newport for a brief upkeep period before participating in ASW exercises with Task Group 8l.0 during the month of August. While on this cruise, the ship visited Bermuda again.

On 9 September 1963, the BERRY left Newport for Norfolk 's ASW Tactical School and further ASW exercises with Task Group 81.0. During October and November additional ASW exercises were conducted, this time with Task Group 83.4. On 16 November, the BERRY returned to her homeport for upkeep, where her crew celebrated the holidays.

In January 1964, after the holiday period, the ship departed Newport to participate in Operation Springboard exercises in the Caribbean . Ports in Puerto Rico and Trinidad were visited prior to completion of the Springboard exercises.

The BERRY returned to Newport in late February with the command attention directed towards preparation for deployment to the Sixth Fleet. In April the BERRY received a tender overhaul, culminating the preparations for deployment on 29 April for a four month Mediterranean cruise. The ship initially participated in NATO exercises with units of the French and Italian Navies. After twenty-three days at sea, the ship arrived in Naples , Italy for a short visit. On departing Naples , visits were made to San Remo for a tender overhaul and then to Athens , Greece .

Departing Athens on 28 June, the BERRY was assigned to COMIDEASTFOR. During this deployment, visits were made to Port Sudan , Aden Protectorate, Mombasa , Kenya and Diego Suarez, Malagasy Republic . Departing the Middle East Force on 11 August, the BERRY returned to the Mediterranean and rejoined units of Destroyer Squadron 10 for transit to Newport .

Arriving in Newport on 27 August 1964, preparations for overhaul at the Boston Naval Shipyard were initiated. During the pre-overhaul tender availability, RADM Charles K. Duncan, USN, COMDESLANT presented CDR F. B. Shrake with the Battle Efficiency "E" award for the fiscal year 1964. Admiral Duncan also presented Departmental Excellency Awards to the Operations, Weapons and Engineering Departments. The Excellence Award received by the Engineering Department was the third consecutive award. Upon completion of the tender availability and an INSURV Inspection, the BERRY departed Newport on 7 October and proceeded to Boston for a three-month overhaul.

During 1965 BERRY conducted routine training cruises off the East Coast and spent a month off Florida for ASW exercises as well as a month in the area of the Virgin Islands engaging in firing practice. During 1965 the ship visited Nassau . Key West , Guantanamo Bay and Jamaica . During one of her cruises the BERRY provided surveillance over a Russian trawler off the East Coast, a task she had done before. Late in 1960 the BERRY sailed to Panama , Guatemala , Jamaica , Venezuela and Puerto Rico, arriving back in Newport on 1 November 1965.

In January 1966, BERRY began her second round-the-world cruise with a deployment to the Far East, serving with the Seventh Fleet in the Vietnam area. The ship departed Newport and traveled through the Panama Canal and made stops in San Diego and Pearl Harbor on its way to Taiwan . During this cruise, the ship spent time in the South China Sea and Gulf of Tonkin doing escort duty for the USS HANCOCK (CVA-19), USS ENTERPRISE (CVN-65) and USS ORISKANY (CVA-34). The Berry entered the Vietnam combat zone for the first time on March 10 th , she was there to provide naval gunfire support for the allied ground forces in the Mekong and Saigon River Delta areas of South Vietnam . Interestingly, after the first several missions (where more than 246 rounds were fired from the 5"-38 guns in actual wartime conditions) some of the barrels cracked on March 21 st. The Berry then joined the Hancock on March 25 th and stayed with her till the 31 st of March when we went to Subic Bay for barrel replacement. There were more Gun Fire Support missions after the new barrels were installed. After returning to duty station and completing the mission, BERRY visited Hong Kong and Yokosuka prior to her return to Newport . Her return route back took her through the Suez Canal where she visited many ports in the Near East and Mediterranean before crossing the Atlantic and arriving home in August 1966. During this deployment many of the crew became "Shellbacks" and "Far East Travelers."

From May to October 1967, the BERRY joined the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean and provided rescue destroyer and escort duties for several carriers. On this tour the ship became involved in the Israeli war after The USS Liberty was attacked and damaged by the Israeli Air Force. The ship took Admiral Kidd out to the Liberty to conduct an investigation. (I can add, while delivering Admiral Kidd to the USS Liberty one night previous as we passed Sicily we observed MT. Etna erupting, the lava flow was visible. Quite a sight. As we reached the USS Liberty I remember it was shortly after daybreak and it was in extensive fog. I recall seeing the bodies of fallen sailors wrapped in white sheets on deck. Frank LaPenta STG3). '65-'68 Berry also distinguished herself in joining the USS Davis in holding down a Russian Foxtrot class submarine for 105 hours and was rewarded with liberty in Palma Majorca. The ship also hosted two groups of midshipmen and participated in major NATO exercise Eager Beaver. The ship visited the Canary Islands and Virgin Islands on its way back to Newport .

From January to March 1968, the BERRY provided services to POLARIS submarines undergoing shakedown training and missile firings at Port Canaveral, Florida . During this period the ship assisted the United Kingdom submarine RESOLUTION to successfully complete the first ballistic missile firing for a British submarine. BERRY was one of several destroyers monitoring Polaris missile tests off the coast of Florida . Upon completion of these tests, the BERRY returned to Boston Naval Shipyard for a major overhaul.

Upon completion of the overhaul, the BERRY sailed to Guantanamo Bay for six-week refresher training. On 14 January 1969 the ship departed Newport for a five-month deployment with the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean . The ship experienced an extremely rough crossing of the Atlantic and docked at Rota , Spain , eleven days after leaving Newport , to undergo turn-over with the U.S.S. DYESS (DD-880). The ship then sailed for Naples , Italy for three days of tender service to repair damages received during the trip. After repairs were completed, the ship traveled to Barcelona , Spain for ten days of liberty and upkeep. BERRY departed Barcelona to conduct Poop Deck, a joint United States and Spanish exercise providing training in simulated air attacks against land forces while protecting our own forces from the threat of air and submarine attacks. Upon completion of Poop Deck, the ship sailed with other members of Task Group 60.1 to the French Riviera for rest and relaxation.

After a ten-day rest period in Golfe Juan , BERRY was again underway, this time to participate in exercise NATIONAL WEEK II. This operation was designed to train the Sixth Fleet forces in conducting surface warfare by locating, tracking and, at the start of hostilities, destroying enemy surface vessels. For the purpose of the exercise, four U.S. Navy ships painted their gun mounts red and acted as enemy guided missile destroyers. BERRY played an active part in the exercise as she intercepted U.S.S. COYINGHAM (DDG-17), designated as an enemy ship, transiting the Straits of Messina. Although COYINGHAM attempted to evade detection, by steaming through heavy seas at flank speeds, BERRY maintained the pace and kept contact with the "enemy," a close five hundred yards astern. The result of the BERRY 's detection and pursuit was the destruction of COYINGHAM by planes from U.S.S. SHANGRI-LA (CVS-38).

At the end of National Week II BERRY sailed to Naples , Italy for a two week tender availability with the U.S.S. TIDEWATER (AD-31). Upon completion of TAV, the ship proceeded to Greece to visit Athens and Piraeus .

BERRY was underway again, for sustained operations, on 11 April to participate in the NATO exercise Dawn Patrol "69." This exercise was a test of the ability of NATO forces to respond to a simulated increase in world tensions that might culminate in general war. The early stages of the exercise consisted of free play activity in an environment of air, surface and submarine threats. BERRY was a participant in the initial conflict in Dawn Patrol "69" which ignited the "wartime" hostilities. Operating as a detached unit, in company with Italian destroyer INDOMNITO , BERRY detected, and held contact with an unidentified submarine. Hostilities commenced when the submarine fired on INDOMNITO. Quick and effective reaction on the part of BERRY and INDOMNITO put an end to the submarine's role in this simulated war.

At the end of Dawn Patrol, BERRY sailed into Naples harbor. From Naples she proceeded to Barcelona , Spain for a second visit and after seven days, departed the Mediterranean , turning over her Sixth Fleet duties to her sister ship U.S.S. NORRIS (DD-859). BERRY arrived in her homeport of Newport , Rhode Island on 31 May 1969.

After leave, upkeep and tender availability, BERRY left Newport on 14 July 1969 to change her homeport to Norfolk , Virginia . She was detached from DESRON 10 and attached to DESRON 2 and DESDIV 22.

From 21 July to 10 August, BERRY was at sea, combining ASW and type training with HUK operations in the Virginia Capes area. From 10 August to 22 August BERRY was in the Caribbean , participating in RIMEX 1-70 and other exercises. She was assigned plane guard, ASW screen ship and host ship for various pieces of target equipment used in gunfire exercises. For a brief period of time the ship played the role of an enemy surface raider whose assignment was to penetrate the defenses of the U.S. Navy forces. BERRY carried out her task as a surface raider with great success.

On 11 August, while on the way to Roosevelt Roads, the ship affected the rescue of the crew of a downed Marine helicopter. On 15 August, CDR Maurice J. Shine assumed the duties of Captain of the U.S.S. FRED T. BERRY (DD-858).

From 26 August to 31 December 1969, the ship had only two underway days and stayed in Norfolk the rest of the time. 31 October and 18 December saw underway training and on 18 December she conducted a burial at sea for the late Edgar E. Martin, DC1, USN (Retired). After returning from this assignment BERRY stayed in port for the rest of the year while her crew enjoyed the holiday leave period.

Throughout the entire second half of 1969, due primarily to Department of Defense imposed personnel reduction, BERRY was plagued with manning problems. From 1 October through 1 December the ship was in a C-4 (non-operational) status, due to insufficient qualified Machinist Mates on board. At the end of the year there were enough Machinist Mates aboard for port and starboard underway watch sections in the engine rooms. BERRY was insufficiently manned, at different times, by Boatswain's Mates, Fire Control Technicians, Gunners Mates and Electronics Technicians. A shipmate and his brother went aboard her in the late 1960's when she was in Norfolk . They talked to several members of the engineering division and were told the ship would soon be decommissioned, partly as a result of damage to her stern. The U.S.S. FRED T. BERRY (DD-858) was decommissioned in September 1970.

BERRY was turned over to INACTSHIPFACNORVA on 15 September 1970 and berthed at Pier 13, North St. Helena , NAVSHIPYDNORVA. Her next movement was to be transferred to an assignment as a DD type target hull for use in PROJECT D/S 580 (An investigation of ship vulnerability). This is in preparation for disposal by sinking. On 17 March 1972, the Naval Research and Development Center accepted custody of the ex-FRED T. BERRY (DD-858).

On 14 May 1972 the BERRY was sunk for a man-made reef off Key West , Florida in the Straits of Florida . She was scuttled at 142352Z May 1972, in fifty-five fathoms of water at 24 degrees 27.8 minutes N3, 81 degrees 33.3 minutes W8 after a successful underwater explosive experiment in connection with CNO PROJ D/S 580.

map courtesy Dick Shanower

Several shipmates have written and commented on the fact that there was a 4 man submersible that was fouled in her rigging where two died. One shipmate remarked about seeing a video reporting this. He said it was eerie to see the number, 858, come into view on the screen. It is reported that the son of Mr. Link, of Link Flight Simulation Systems, was one of those losing his life in that mishap.

She hated submarines with a passion, as she did when she was fully active. Even in death, it seems she still hated them.

THIS HISTORY WAS PUT TOGETHER THROUGH THE EFFORTS OF SEVERAL FORMER FRED T. BERRY CREWMEMBERS. ADDITIONS WILL BE WELCOMED FROM OTHER CREWMEMBERS AND THE HISTORY WILL BE UPDATED PERIODICALLY TO REFLECT THESE ADDITIONS.

This received from Vinnie Crimaudo S 1/c USS Norris squadron/shipmate.

Perhaps I can fill in some of the missing gaps of 1946/47. I boarded the Norris DD859 at Tsingtao , China at the end of April or early May 1946. We had just come from the states on board the APA31 USS Monrovia and there were about 1000 of us including two marine detachments. I guess we were the replacements for the DD858-59-60 &61. The four ships were a squadron and we cruised the china coast doing mail runs to Korea , Jinsin, Hong Kong & Shanghai. The four ships did several fleet exercises with submarines & the carrier Princeton . We were assigned screen and downed pilots pick up for the carrier. Sometime between Dec 46 & Feb 47 we were sent to Korea and started policing the area between main land China and Korea and were stopping vessels delivering contraband to Korea . Our port of call in Korea was Pusan . The four ships left the China Sea sometime in early March for stateside. We stopped at Guam , Hawaii and then into San Diego around June 47. August of 47 the four ships then went to Bremerton Washington for dry-dock and overhaul. The ships left Bremerton sometime around end of October for west coast duty stopping in Vancouver , British Columbia , San Francisco and San Diego . I was discharged in Dec 47 and if my memory is right the ships went back to Tsingtao . I hope this fills in the gap of 46-47 Vinnie


USS Bremerton (CA-130), 14 February 1952 - History

1952 - USS Cusk (SS-348) Year by Year History

Click on any image to see its full size

Avalon Bay, Catalina Island, California

As seen through the Cusk's periscope

Clay Gatlin goes overboard

Avalon Bay, Catalina Island, California

As seen through the Cusk's periscope

Avalon Bay, Catalina Island, California

As seen through the Cusk's periscope

Removing a wing section from the hanger

Main body of missile being removed from the hanger

Next out is the JATO (Jet Assisted Takeoff Assembly) pack and skid

Attaching the main body to the JATO and skid

(Photos courtesy of National Archives)

Completing the wing assembly

Assembling the nose cone and guidance equipment (Photos courtesy of National Archives)

Pulse Jet engine attachment

(Photos courtesy of National Archives)

Completing the nose cone assembly and making attachments for testing

(Photos courtesy of National Archives)

(Photos courtesy of National Archives)

Missile assembly is almost complete

(Photos courtesy of National Archives)

(Photos courtesy of National Archives)

(Photos courtesy of National Archives)

More testing of guidance system

(Photos courtesy of National Archives)

(Photos courtesy of National Archives)

Missile is assembled, tested and ready for launch

Crewmembers who served aboard the Cusk in 1952:

If you have any information, pictures, history, or crewmember names/information from the Cusk in 1952 (or any year), please contact the Cusk Webmaster. Thanks!

All information and pictures herein were contributed by, and are the property of crewmembers of the USS Cusk. I t is intended solely for your enjoyment and education, and for preserving the memory and history of this great ship . If you take anything or make copies, please give proper credit. Your questions and comments are welcomed, as are any pictorial or historical contributions you might wish to donate or loan.

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USS Bremerton (CA-130), 14 February 1952 - History

The keel for the Nimitz (CVAN 68) was laid down on June 22, 1968, at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company in Newport News, Va.

May 13, 1972 The Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Nimitz was christened and launched from Shipway 11, Newport News. Based upon a design originally submitted to build the Midway class of aircraft carriers during WWII, the company raised the 1,100 foot long submerged shipway from tidal flats and extended it to accommodate Nimitz-class aircraft carriers. Capt. Bryan W. Compton, Jr., is the prospective commanding officer.

March 1, 1975 PCU Nimitz underway for the first time to conduct Builder's sea trials.

April 12, The Nimitz arrived for the first time in its homeport of Naval Station Norfolk, Norfolk, Va., after delivered to the U.S. Navy on April 11.

May 3, USS Nimitz was commissioned at Naval Station Norfolk's Pier 12. Secretary of Defense James R. Schlesinger, Secretary of the Navy J. William Middendorf and CNO Adm. James L. Holloway, III, were among the more than 20,000 guests.

May 31, Adm. Isaac C. Kidd, Jr., relieved Adm. Ralph W. Cousins as Commander, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, during a change-of-command ceremony on board the Nimitz.

July 1, The U.S. Navy replaced the aircraft carrier designation CVA with CV for all such ships still so designated, including Nimitz, a redesignation made to improve the accuracy of ship nomenclature, reflecting their roles in modern warfare. By removing the letter A (attack), the new designation CV indicated a multi-role ship capable of performing air, surface and ASW roles, depending upon the types of aircraft embarked and missions assigned.

From July 16 through Aug. 24, USS Nimitz underwent its initial Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE) in the Guantanamo Bay Operating Area, Cuba. After departing Caribbean, the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier operated in the North Atlantic with Nuclear Task Force (TF) 75 and returned to Norfolk on Sept. 24.

On October 1, CVN 68 entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard at Portsmouth, Va., for a Post Shakedown Availability (PSA).

From January 28 through Feb. 10, 1976, the Nimitz conducted Refresher Training (REFTRA) in the Guantanamo Bay OPAREA.

From May 11-20, the carrier participated in a pre-deployment exercise Solid Shield, off the Carolinas.

July 7, 1976 USS Nimitz departed Naval Station Norfolk for its maiden deployment in the Mediterranean. Included in the task force were the nuclear-powered cruisers USS South Carolina (CGN 37) and USS California (CGN 36).

July 16, USS Nimitz conducted turnover with USS Saratoga (CV 60) off Morocco. On July 27, the ship stood by in readiness to assist in the possible evacuation of over 1,100 Americans from Lebanon, a country wracked by civil war.

From Oct. 3-11, the Nimitz participated in Display Determination, an exercise with over 45 Allied vessels, designed to test North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) power projection across the Mediterranean.

From Nov. 18-19, a detachment from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, comprising one E-2B, two A-6Es and one EA-6B, participated in Joint Maritime Course 764. The 40 man contingent joined British, Canadian, German and Norwegian forces in the multi-national exercise conducted off northern and eastern Scotland.

USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) relieved USS Nimitz at Naval Station Rota, Spain, Jan. 25-27, 1977. CVN 68 returned home on Feb. 7.

March 10, The Nimitz entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a four-month Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA).

December 1, 1977 USS Nimitz, commanded by Capt. Richard T. Gaskill, departed homeport for its second Mediterranean deployment. F-14A Tomcats, S-3A Vikings and SH-3Hs deployed for the first time.

March 15, 1978 The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Venice, Italy, for a five-day visit.

From May 2-9, USS Nimitz participated in NATO exercise Open Gate, off the coast of Portugal.

From May 16-29, Nimitz participated in NATO exercise Dawn Patrol, with over 70 ships and submarines, stretching across the central and eastern Mediterranean. Nimitz&rsquos aircrew tested their mettle against their counterparts flying aircraft from USS Forrestal (CV 59) and the French Navy&rsquos FS Foch (R 99), as well as against USAF and NATO commands. CVW-8 flew over 1,800 sorties and 4,300 hours during Dawn Patrol&rsquos brisk pace.

July 7, CVN 68 arrived at Naval Station Rota, for the second time, to conduct turnover with USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67).

July 20, USS Nimitz returned to Norfolk after a nearly eight-month deployment.

October 2, Adm. Harry D. Train, II, relieved Adm. Kidd as Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic, Commander-in-Chief Atlantic, and Commander, Atlantic Fleet during a ceremony aboard the Nimitz.

January 5, 1979 USS Nimitz returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a three-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) at Norfolk Naval Shipyard. Although the carrier concluded the SRA on Dec. 13, "a lack of pier space" at NS Norfolk forced it to remain yard-bound.

From Feb. 20 through March 2, the Nimitz conducted Refresher Training with Fleet Training Group in the Guantanamo Bay Op. Area.

Upon returning to Norfolk from Carrier Qualifications in May, the CVN 68 commenced a two-month repairs to a propulsion plant structural defect.

September 10, 1979 USS Nimitz, commanded by Capt. John R. Batzler, departed Naval Station Norfolk for its third Mediterranean deployment.

From Oct. 31- Nov. 12, the Nimitz played a key role in CRISEX, a joint naval amphibious exercise with the Spaniards that envisioned a scenario to repel invaders from gaining a foothold along the Spanish Mediterranean coast the evolution involved more than two dozen ships, submarines and 35,000 troops.

November 3, An F-14A, assigned to Fighter Squadron (VF) 41, crashed into the water after failed to recover from a high speed, low level (80º&ndash90º) practice combat air patrol interception vs. USAF F-111 Aardvarks, off the eastern Spanish coast. Cmdr. David J. Formo, "Black Aces" CO, and Lt. Cmdr. Nicholas J. DeLello were killed.

In November, An A-6E Intruder, assigned to Attack Squadron (VA) 35, and piloted by Lt. Cmdr. John M. Luecke and Lt. j.g. Frederick Eliot, completed the 50,000th landing on board the Nimitz.

December 6, An A-6A, assigned to Attack Squadron (VA) 35, suffered what appeared to be a "catastrophic wing failure" and crashed into the water, possibly due to being struck accidentally by weapons released by another Intruder, while conducting a bombing run at Avgo Nisi, a small deserted Greek island north of Crete. Lt. j.g. Mark S. Gontkovic and Lt. j.g. Anthony J. R. were killed.

December 16, An EA-6B, assigned to Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron (VAQ) 134, experienced "fuel starvation" during an emergency divert to Palermo, Sicily. The pilot, Lt. j.g. Robert W. Dark, was killed during ejection.

December 21, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Naples, Italy, for its half-deployment Standdown period. After a two-week, the USS Nimitz was dispatched to strengthen the U.S. Naval presence in the crucial Indian Ocean area as tensions heightened over Iran's taking of 52 American hostages on Nov. 4.

January 23, 1980 The Nimitz arrived on Gulf of Oman Naval Zone of Operations (GONZO) station, after transiting around the Cape of Good Hope.

April 24-25, Eight Sikorsky RH-53D Sea Stallions took off from USS Nimitz to rescue the hostages held by the Iranians in Operation Eagle Claw (Evening Light). The helos were heading to "Desert One", a pre-selected refueling site in the Iranian desert, a distance of almost 600 n.m., to load a 120 man Army assault team and proceed to two additional sites. Six Lockheed C-130 Hercules with the ground rescue forces flew on a different track and time schedule from al Masirah Island, Oman, to Desert One. Helicopter No. 6 experienced a mechanical malfunction approximately two hours into the operation and was forced to come about. A haboob, a huge dust cloud, slammed into the formation barely an hour later. The helo crews resolutely broke out of it and continued, but encountered a second larger haboob almost immediately. Helicopter No. 5 suffered a "critical" failure and returned to the carrier. Helicopter No. 2 suffered multiple mechanical failures while en route, though the crew chose to continue to Desert One to effect repairs, which subsequently proved impossible without facilities and parts. Planning called for a minimum of six operational helos to rescue the hostages, and with only five capable of continuing, commanders aborted the mission. While repositioning at Desert One, one of the helos collided with a refueling C-130. In the ensuing explosion and fire, eight servicemen died: five USAF aircrew (including four officers) in the C-130, and three USMC aircrew aboard the RH-53D, with only the helicopter pilot and co-pilot (both badly burned) surviving. During the following frantic evacuation by the C-130s, five Stallions were left behind mostly intact, some damaged by shrapnel. The Iranians gained at least four of them.

May 26, USS Nimitz returned to Norfolk after eight-and-a-half month deployment. The homecoming was the largest given to any carrier battle group returning to the United States since the end of World War II. During this 270 day extended deployment the aircraft carrier operated for 144 of them continuously at sea, including 115 of Iranian contingency operations.

From Aug. 29 through Oct. 17, the Nimitz was deployed to the North Atlantic, participating in Teamwork '80, a multi-threat exercise with British, Canadian, Dutch, German and Norwegian forces.

October 27, USS Nimitz entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a three-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

May 25, 1981 During work ups off the eastern Florida coast, an EA-6B Prowler, assigned to Marine Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron (VMAQ) 2 Det. Y, crash-landed on the flight deck at 2351, killing 14 crewmen (including Prowler crew: Capt. Elwood M. Armstrong, Jr., 1st Lt. Steve E. White and 1st Lt. Lawrence D. Cragun) and injuring 48 others. The fire destroyed Prowler and three Tomcats, and damaged two Tomcats, nine Corsair IIs, one Intruder, three Vikings and one Sea King. The Nimitz returned to port to repair damaged catapults and returned to sea less than 48 hours later to complete its training schedule.

June 27, An A-7E Corsair II crashed in the Caribbean Sea, around 1.30 a.m., about 50 miles northeast of St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, 16 miles from the Nimitz. Cmdr. Robert Farris was killed.

August 3, USS Nimitz departed Naval Station Norfolk for its fourth Mediterranean deployment.

On August 18 and 19, USS Nimitz and USS Forrestal (CV 59) conducted an open ocean missile exercise in the Gulf of Sidra near what Libyan leader Khadafi called the "Line of Death." On the morning of Aug. 19, two aircraft from VF-41 were fired upon by Libyan pilots. The pilots returned fire and shot both Libyan Sukhoi Su-22 Fitters from the sky.

On Oct. 6, the Jihad terrorists assassinated Egyptian President Mohamed Anwar Al-Sadat, forcing the Nimitz to cut short an intended four day visit to Venice, Italy. CVN 68 proceeded to the eastern Mediterranean, where it remained for 17 days to respond to the ongoing crisis, before returning to Naples, Italy, on Oc. 29.

November 17, An S-3A, assigned to Anti-Submarine Squadron (VS) 24, crashed into the water just aft of Nimitz, about 70 miles northwest of Sicily. CO Cmdr. Phillip L. Reed, Lt. Douglas C. Deem, Lt. j.g. Carey A. Arthur and AW3 Charles Wade were killed.

USS Nimitz conducted turnover with USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) while anchored in Tangier Harbor, Morocco, January 16-17, 1982. Both carrier battle groups then participated with the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) Battle Group (BG) in multi-threat exercise National Week XXXI, Jan. 20-30.

February 12, USS Nimitz returned to homeport after more than a six-month deployment.

June 24, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier completed the two-and-a-half month SRA at Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY).

November 10, USS Nimitz departed Norfolk for its fifth major deployment.

The Nimitz first sailed southward, where she stood off Honduran, Columbian and Venezuelan waters before coming about to eastward. Entered the Mediterranean on Nov. 30. Conducted a cross deck with USS Independence (CV 62), off Lebanon, on Dec. 6.

In March 1983, USS Nimitz operated in the waters north of Libya, with USS Enterprise (CVN 65), after fighting in Chad and Sudan between separatists and Libyan invaders, combined with Libyan threats against the Egyptians, exacerbated a crisis in Equatorial and North Africa.

From Apri 4-27, CVN 68 participated in exercise National Week, operating as the centerpiece of Blue forces against Orange flagship USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70).

May 10, The Nimitz departed Mediterranean Sea after relieved by USS Dwight D. Eisenhower on May 9.

May 20, USS Nimitz returned to Naval Station Norfolk following a six-month deployment to the U.S. 4th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR). While on station in the eastern Mediterranean, the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 aircrews flew more than 12,000 flight hours in support of the Multi-National Force operating in Lebanon.

July 23, 1984 USS Nimitz departed for sea trials after completing the 13-month Complex Overhaul (COH) at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company.

September 11, The Nimitz emergency sortied from Naval Station Norfolk to avoid the approaching Hurricane Diana. The ship evaded the storm and began Navy sea trials in the bargain.

September 26, Capt. Eugene D. Conner relieved Capt. Raymond P. Ilgm as CO of the CVN 68.

November 1, Capt. Conner and Cmdr. Daniel L. Rainey, Jr., CO of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, completed Nimitz&rsquos 100,000th trap, in an S-3A.

March 8, 1985 USS Nimitz departed Norfolk for its sixth Mediterranean deployment.

From March 15-27, the aircraft carrier completed Readiness Exercise 1-85 followed by an operational readiness evaluation, in the Caribbean Sea.

From March 28 through April 12, USS Nimitz steamed off the eastern coast of Central America for "U.S. Naval Presence Operations," due to heightened tensions resulting from fighting against Marxist rebels.

April 21, CVN 68 anchored in Augusta Bay, Italy, to conduct turnover with Dwight D. Eisenhower.

From May 6-17, the Nimitz participated in a multi-national exercise Distant Hammer with USAF, French, Italian and Turkish forces in the Mediterranean.

On June 14, two Lebanese Shiite Muslim gunmen hijacked TWA Flight 847, carrying 153 passengers and crew, including many Americans. In response, USS Nimitz cancelled a visit to Livorno, Italy, and was ordered to steam at flank speed to the eastern Mediterranean, off the coast of Lebanon, where it remained until August.

From August 4-9, the Nimitz participated in Operation Bright Star '85, a huge exercise with United States, Egyptian, Jordanian, Omani and Somali forces.

USS Nimitz turned over to USS Saratoga (CV 60) at Augusta Bay, Italy, on Sept. 10, but the ongoing crisis in the Middle East in the wake of terrorists kidnapping several Americans in Beirut, forced her to divert and race to eastern Mediterranean.

September 15, ABHAN Adam K. Marks, fell overboard off the port side, when his tractor rolled off the deck into the catwalk, at 0016. An SH-3H from HS-9 rescued him within the hour.

October 4, USS Nimitz returned to homeport after a seven-month deployment.

November 1, CVN 68 entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

March 4, 1986 The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier departed for a three-day sea trials.

From August 15 through Oct. 16, USS Nimitz was deployed to North Atlantic for participation in NATO exercises Northern Engagement and Northern Wedding '86, both designed to test NATO&rsquos ability and resolve to defend northern Europe against an East Bloc attack. Ships in company included USS Iowa (BB 61), USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20), USS South Carolina (CGN 37), USS Kidd (DDG 993), USS Richard E. Byrd (DDG 23), USS Thorn (DD 988), USS Doyle (FFG 39), USS W.S. Sims (FF 1059), USS Moinester (FF 1097), USS Truett (FF 1095), USS Kalamazoo (AOR 6) and USS Nitro (AE 23).

September 4, An A-7E Corsair II crashed in the Norwegian Sea. Despite an "intensive" search the crew could not recover the pilot.

December 30, USS Nimitz departed Naval Station Norfolk for its seventh major deployment and a homeport change to Bremerton, Wash.

January 25, 1987 An EA-3B Skywarrior from Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron (VQ) 2, crashed while landing on board the Nimitz in the Ionian Sea, at 2328. The front wheel caught the barricade net and the aircraft skidded across the flight deck, going over the edge and breaking apart as it struck the water. Lt. Cmdr. Ronald R. Callander, Lt. Stephen H. Batchelder, Lt. Alan A. Levine, Lt. James D. Richards, AT2 Richard A. Herzing, CTI3 Patrick R. Price and CTI3 Craig H. Rudolf were killed.

February 24, An A-7E, assigned to Attack Squadron (VA) 82, crashed at sea after a cat shoot. The pilot ejected safely.

From May 3-15, the Nimitz participated in NATO exercise Dragon Hammer, which "enhanced the combat effectiveness, readiness, coordination and interoperability of allied sea, amphibious and air forces."

May 20, USS Nimitz anchored in Augusta Bay, Sicily, to conduct turnover with USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63). After a port visit to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, CVN 68 rounded the Cape Horn on June 18. The carrier arrived in Puget Sound, Wash., anchoring overnight outside of Rich Passage July 1 before mooring at Pier B, Naval Station Bremerton on July 2, to complete its homeport shift.

August 28, Capt. Brent M. Bennitt relieved Capt. Eugene D. Conner as commanding officer of the Nimitz.

February 8, 1988 USS Nimitz completed the five-and-a-half month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) at PSNS.

From March 6-7, the Nimitz participated in exercise CNO Project 0779 Support on Nanoose Range, British Columbia, Canada, the first U.S. aircraft carrier to use the range in 22 years.

September 2, USS Nimitz departed Bremerton, Wash., for its eight major deployment.

From Sept. 13 through Oct. 2, CVN 68 operated off the South Korean coast to provide security for the Olympic Games in Seoul.

On October 29, USS Nimitz began operating in the North Arabian Sea where it participated in Operation "Earnest Will." This operation called for U.S. Navy ships to protect shipping lanes and escort U.S. registered (re-flagged) Kuwaiti tankers.

November 30, A 20 mm gun mounted on an A-7E fired during a "troubleshooting" maintenance check, and hit a KA-6D tanker, setting it afire, while the ship steamed in the northern Arabian Sea, at about 0250. AMH2 Douglas S. Dimberg died, and AA Chadwick R. Henderson received injuries. The fire damaged five Corsair IIs, an Intruder, and a Viking, and the crew jettisoned the KA-6D off the flight deck as "unsalvageable."

From Dec. 12-15, USS Nimitz, USS Waddell (DDG 24) and USS Barbey (FF 1088) conducted a PASSEX with the Omanis. The exercise included air to air refueling, ship tactical maneuvering, anti-air warfare, "splash" target bombing, gunnery, and a War at Sea scenario, near Wudam Naval Base, Oman.

From Dec. 19-21, the carrier participated in Beacon Flash and Al Barq Al Lama&rsquoa 39, a pair of exercises with the Omanis, which included dissimilar air combat training against Omani Hawker Siddeley Hunters and Sepecat Jaguars, and low level passes, electronic warfare and opposed strikes in the vicinity of Thumrait Airfield, Oman.

December 31, USS Nimitz anchored off the coast of Singapore for a six-day port visit, the first after 71 days at sea.

On January 17, 1989, the Nimitz conducted turnover with USS Constellation (CV 64) and returned to Bremerton March 2.

Fron June 15 through July 1, CVN 68 participated in joint exercise NORPAC 89-1 with the USAF in the vicinity of the Aleutian Islands and Alaska.

August 19, USS Nimitz entered the Dry Dock #6 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for an Extended Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (E-DSRA).

September 16, Capt. Robert C. Williamson relieved Capt. Brent M. Bennitt as CO of the Nimitz.

March 3, 1990 The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier departed dry dock and moved to Pier 3.

May 11, USS Nimitz departed Bremerton for a week-long sea trials. On June 2, the ship pulled into Naval Air Station Alameda, Calif., for a two-day port call.

July 2, While mooring to the Ammunition Pier at Naval Weapons Station Indian Island, Wash., No. 2 main engine surged aft, causing "tight line" conditions on lines 4, 7, 8 and 10. The crew responded to the dangerous situation and saved the ship from damage. BM3 McCallister, however, suffered a broken arm during the mishap and had to be evacuated to the Naval Hospital at Bremerton.

February 25, 1991 USS Nimitz departed Naval Station Bremerton for a scheduled three weeks of training, off the coast of southern California. The carrier pulled into Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, on Feb. 28.

March 5, Due to Gulf War I, however, the Nimitz received orders to deploy early and came about for the western Pacific. The E-2C+ made its maiden deployment during this cruise. Foul weather pounded the ship during the first few days, causing "pitching deck conditions" that rendered flight operations extremely hazardous.

April 4, USS Nimitz anchored off the coast of Singapore for a four-day port call.

April 18, USS Nimitz entered the Arabian Gulf after transiting Strait of Hormuz and relieved USS Ranger (CV 61) on 19th. On the next day she commenced flight operations in support of Desert Storm and Desert Sabre.

April 27, The Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147 sent a detachment of three Hornets, four officers and 26 enlisted sailors to Al Dhafra AB in the United Arab Emirates, where they participated in the air combat training exercise.

May 7, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored of the coast of Dubai for a brief port visit to United Arab Emirates. Another visit to Dubai from May 25-29.

June 7, AM3 Donald A. Ochab was recovered after fell overboard around 0400, while working on a Tomcat.

July 12, An F/A-18C, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147, slammed into the ramp, around 2200, but miraculously caught the No. 3 arrester wire while in full afterburner. Lt. Michael M. Gautreaux ejected and landed on the flight deck with minor abrasions. The crew began applying foam to the fire within 23 seconds, though the crash destroyed the aircraft. ABH2 James A. Gilley courageously entered the Hornet&rsquos cockpit and secured the engines, which remained in full afterburner.

August 24, USS Nimitz returned to homeport after a six-month deployment in the Arabian Gulf and western Pacific.

October 12, The Nimitz arrived in San Francisco, Calif., to participate in Fleet Week '91 celebration.

On Oct. 19, CVN 68 entered the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash., for a seven-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

February 1, 1993 USS Nimitz departed Bremerton for its tenth major deployment.

The Nimitz relieved USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) on March 18 and entered the Arabian Gulf on 21st to take its place as part of Operation Southern Watch.

April 10, The aircraft carrier pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a four-day port call. Two more visits to Dubai from May 8-12 and June 11-16.

August 19, USS Nimitz returned to Naval Station Bremerton, Wash., after six-and-a-half month underway period in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR).

Following Fleet Replenishment Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ), Nimitz departed NAS North Island on Dec. 7 to PSNS to prepare for drydocking. A fierce storm encountered en route, however, forced her to change course to outrun heavy seas.

January 29, 1994 CVN 68 entered the dry-dock at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash., for an Extended Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (E-DSRA).

August 26, Capt. Alfred G. Harms, Jr., relieved Capt. John B. Nathman as CO of the Nimitz.

January 20, 1995 Petty Officer 2nd Class Daniel J. Avila was killed when air pressure blew a 100-pound steel cap off the equipment, while working on arresting gear machinery at about 10:30 p.m. Two other Petty Officers were injured.

January 28, USS Nimitz departed for a five-day sea trials after completing the 13-month EDSRA.

In September, the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier participated in a Fleet Exercise (FLEETEX) 95-2A and from Sept. 25- Oct. 6, in Joint Tactical Fleet Exercise (JTFEX) off the coast of southern California.

November 27, USS Nimitz departed for a scheduled deployment to the western Pacific and Arabian Gulf.

From January 13-17, 1996, the Nimitz participated in exercise Inspired Alert with the Pakistanis.

January 19, CVN 68 transited Strait of Hormuz and commenced flight operations in support of OSW, on station in the Arabian Gulf.

February 22, An F-14A, assigned to the Fighter Squadron (VF) 24, crashed in the Gulf during a "maintenance profile." Lt. Cmdr. Roger A. Pyle and Lt. Thomas A. Eberhard ejected safely.

March 2?, USS Nimitz arrived in the waters off Taiwan, to relieve USS Independence (CV 62), where once again the presence of carrier forces at sea positively influenced events ashore, calming a volatile standoff between mainland China and Taiwan. The carrier proceeded to the South China Sea via the Luzon Strait on April 14 and returned home on May 20.

November 6, Capt. Isaac E. Richardson, III relieved Capt. Alfred G. Harms, Jr., as commanding officer of USS Nimitz.

January 22, 1997 The Nimitz departed Bremerton to conduct sea trials and ammunition onload at Port Hadlock after a seven-month, $84 million worth, ESRA at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.

USS Nimitz participated in a Fleet Exercise (FLEETEX) 97-2, from June 23- July 3, and Joint Tactical Fleet Exercise (JTFEX) 97-2, from July 14-27, off the coast of southern California.

September 1, USS Nimitz departed Bremerton for its twelveth major deployment and around-the-world cruise to the East Coast to begin a multi-year overhaul in the Newport News shipyard.

From Sept. 23-25, the Nimitz participated in exercise Valiant Blitz off Okinawa with the USS Independence.

October 13, CVN 68 entered the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation Southern Watch, completing a 6,000 mile voyage 12 days earlier than originally scheduled.

November 26, USS Nimitz pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for an eight-day visit to Dubai after participating in exercise Neon Falcon off the coast of Bahrain, Nov. 15-25. From Dec. 6-10, the ship participated in exercise Nautical Artist with the Saudis and Eager Mace with the Kuwaitis from Dec. 13-24.

February 14, 1998 The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier entered the Mediterranean Sea after transiting Suez Canal.

From Feb. 23-25, the Nimitz conducted ammunition offload with USS Enterprise (CVN 65) and USS Detroit (AOE 4), 750 n.m. into the Atlantic.

March 1, USS Nimitz moored at Naval Station Norfolk's Pier 1 after a six-month Middle East deployment.

May 26, CVN 68 transited "deadstick" to Dry Dock 11 at Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipbuilding, for a three-year Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH).

January 14, 1999 Seaman Brian E. Hubert died Thursday evening after falling more than 30 feet down a ventilation shaft near a berthing area.

November 6, The Nimitz moved from dry-dock to Outfitting Berth #1 at Newport News shipyard.

June 28, 2001 USS Nimitz returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a three-day sea trials, completing the 37-month RCOH.

From July 16-23, the carrier was underway to conduct precision approach and landing system and flight deck certifications.

September 21, The Nimitz departed Norfolk en route to San Diego, Calif.

November 3, USS Nimitz pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a four-day port call.

November 13, CVN 68 arrived at its new homeport of Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego, after a nearly two-month transit around Cape Horn. During the transit, the ship trained with Brazilian, Uruguayan, Chilean and Peruvian naval forces.

May 14, 2002 The Nimitz completed a week-long sea trials after a four-month Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) while pierside at NAS North Island.

May 17, Capt. Robert J. Gilman relieved Capt. Steven F. Firks as CO of the CVN 68.

August 13, USS Nimitz departed San Diego for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) I.

In September, the aircraft carrier began TSTA II/III and also conducted exercises testing out its CEC system. This test of the CEC system was the first for the West Coast.

September 19, USS Nimitz anchored in Esquimalt Harbour for a three-day visit to Victoria, B.C., Canada.

October 1?, The Nimitz departed San Diego for engineering work-ups off the coast of southern California. Underway for routine training again on Dec. 9.

January 10, 2003 USS Nimitz Carrier Battle Group departed San Diego to begin a compressed three-week training exercise. The first two weeks will focus on a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), and the third will concentrate on a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX).

March 3, USS Nimitz CBG departed San Diego, Calif., for a surge Middle East deployment.

From March 30- April 6, two F/A-18E, piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Hal Schmitt and Lt. Cmdr. Jason Norris of VFA-14, and two F/A-18Fs from VFA-41 flown by Lt. Cmdr. Brian Garrison and Lt. Comdr. Mark Weisgerber and Lt. Tom Poulter and Lt. Tom Brodine, temporarily shifted from the Nimitz to Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) to provide an improved mix of fighter/tanker capabilities. The transfer involved a 1,700 mile flight.

April 11, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

May 12, The aircraft carrier departed Jebel Ali, U.A.E., after a five-day port visit to Dubai.

July 3, USS Nimitz pulled again into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a six-day port call.

July 27, An EA-6B, assigned to Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 135, crashed in the Arabian Gulf at approximately 1100. Seahawks from HS-6 rescued all four aircrew.

Throughout much of August and into early September the Nimitz transited back and forth from the North Arabian Sea into the Persian Gulf. On or about Sept. 6 she began heading east, enterring the Indian Ocean on Sept. 8.

September 12, USS Nimitz pulled into Changi Naval Base for a scheduled port visit to Singapore.

After conducting operations in the Indian Ocean and the Andaman Sea throughout the rest of September into October the Nimitz made one final port call at Singapore from Oct. 8-13. On 14th she was in the South China Sea, and on 20th she enterred the Pacific Ocean.

October 27, USS Nimitz, along with USS Princeton (CG 59) and combat support ship USS Bridge, pulled into Pearl Harbor for a four-day port call to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise.

November 5, USS Nimitz returned to homeport after an extended eight-month deployment. During the ship's underway period, aircraft from CVW-11 flew more than 6,500 missions and dropped over 125,000 pounds of ordnance in direct support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. In addition, this was the first deployment of the F/A-18F and E-2C Hawkeye 2000. CVN 68 is also the first aircraft carrier to deploy with two Super Hornet squadrons.

February 23, 2004 USS Nimitz commenced a six-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) while pierside at NAS North Island. From air conditioning units and electronics, to berthing spaces and self-service laundry, the ship will receive many upgrades, improvements and repairs. Besides the quality of life improvements the carrier is scheduled to receive, it will also have an overhaul of some of its mission essential equipment and systems. One of the most complex tasks to be performed will be modifying the ship's 10 air conditioning plants to use environmentally friendly refrigerant. The replacement of catwalk grating, the rework of the catapults, the resurfacing of the flight deck and the replacement of service steam piping throughout the ship are also scheduled.

August 17, Vice Adm. James M. Zortman relieved Vice Adm. Michael D. Malone as Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Nimitz.

August 21, CVN 68 is currently underway for sea trials, off the coast of southern California, after completing a six-month PIA. Conducted daytime flight operations for the first time since returning home from OIF on Aug. 26.

November 20, USS Nimitz returned to Naval Air Station North Island after a 23-day underway for Tailored Ship’s Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Period (FEP).

November 23, Capt. Ted N. Branch relieved Capt. Robert J. Gilman as commanding officer of USS Nimitz.

December 2, The Nimitz is currently underway for a Composite Unit Training Exercise (COMPUTEX) in the SOCAL Op. Area.

January 26, 2005 CVN 68 is currently underway for Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE) off the coast of southern California.

March 25, USS Nimitz returned to San Diego after completing a two-week Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX).

April 4, The Nimitz is currently underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ).

May 7, USS Nimitz Carrier Strike Group (CSG) departed San Diego for a scheduled western Pacific deployment.

May 18, The aircraft carrier pulled into Naval Station Pearl Harbor for a routine port visit.

June 7, USS Nimitz departed Hong Kong after a four-day port call.

June 18, The Nimitz pulled into Apra Harbor, Guam, for a four-day port call.

July 4, USS Nimitz departed Port Klang, Malaysia, after a three-day port visit to Kuala Lumpur.

September 22, USS Nimitz and CVW-11 concluded nine weeks of supporting Maritime Security Operations (MSO) in the Arabian Gulf, when the ship transited the Strait of Hormuz into the Indian Ocean. Aircrafts from CVW 11 launched more than 4,500 sorties totaling more than 11,000 flight hours since entering the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Operations. Of those, more than 1,100 sorties and 6,000 flight hours have been in direct support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

September 28, Transiting the Indian Ocean, the Nimitz Carrier Strike Group will participate in exercise Malabar 2005, with the Indian Navy, designed to increase interoperability between the two navies while enhancing the cooperative security relationship between India and the United States.

October 7, USS Nimitz, along with USNS Bridge (T-AOE 10), anchored off the coast of Fremantle, Australia, for a five-day port visit to Perth.

October 30, CVN 68 pulled into Naval Station Pearl Harbor for a brief port visit and to pick up "Tigers."

November 8, USS Nimitz returned to homeport after a six-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR.

January 6, 2006 The Nimitz is currently underway for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) Preps.

February 1, CVN 68 is currently conducting Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) off the West Coast.

February 8, The Nimitz is underway off the coast of southern California conducting Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE).

From February 10-11, USS Nimitz conducted ammunition offload with the USNS Bridge (T-AOE 2) and USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74).

August 30, The aircraft carrier is currently underway conducting sea trials after successfully completing a six-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) period.

September 16, USS Nimitz departed San Diego with more than 3,200 guests, for a "Friends and Family Day Cruise."

October 3, The Navy paraded ships and aircraft through San Diego Bay Oct. 1 to kick-off San Diego's Fleet Week celebration. Nearly 100,000 San Diegans and visitors from neighboring towns watched ships, including USS Nimitz, USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53), USS Ogden (LPD 5) and USS Princeton (CG 59) sail through San Diego Bay. People also lined up for ship tours immediately following the procession.

October 9, Thousands of spectators gathered along the embarcadero and Marina Green Oct. 7 to view the annual parade of ships, kicking off San Francisco Fleet Week 2006. The flotilla of Navy vessels highlighting the event included USS Nimitz, USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), USS Princeton (CG 59), USS Chafee (DDG 90), USS Higgins (DDG 76) and USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53). U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Steadfast (WMEC 623) also participated in the procession.

November 2, CVN 68 passed another milestone on the way to deployment when the crew successfully completed Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) after more than 30 days at sea.

December 1, The San Diego-based aircraft carrier, along with Carrier Air Wing Eleven (CVW 11), is currently underway conducting Composite Training Unit Excercise (COMPTUEX) off the coast of southern California.

January 12, 2007 USS Nimitz is currently underway conducting routine training exercises in the Pacific Ocean.

January 31, CVN 68 is currently underway conducting Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) of the Californian coast. The ship returned to Naval Air Station North Island after a routine trainings on Feb. 15.

February 27, The Nimitz CSG is currently underway conducting Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) off the West Coast.

April 2, USS Nimitz departed San Diego for a scheduled deployment in support of the global war on terrorism.

May 8, The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group entered the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations to conduct maritime security operations (MSO) in regional waters, and provide air support to ground forces operating in Afghanistan and Iraq. Aircraft from CVW-11 began conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) on 11th.

May 23, USS Nimitz and USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) CSG-s and USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) Expeditionary Strike Group entered the Arabian Gulf to conduct missions in direct support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and perform Expeditionary Strike Force (ESF) training.

May 28, USS Nimitz moored at Berth 58/59, Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a five-day liberty visit to Dubai.

June 3, The Nimitz resume its support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. So far, the CVW-11 has flown 788 sorties and more than 2,800 hours in direct support of OEF.

July 2, USS Nimitz, along with USS Pinckney (DDG 91), pulled into Chennai, India, for a scheduled port visit Returned to Arabian Gulf on July 12.

August 1, Capt. Thomas Downing relieved Capt. David Woods as commanding officer of CVW-11 during an airborne change-of-command ceremony. The Nimitz is curently in the Pacific Ocean and is scheduled to participate in exercise Valiant Shield, off the coast of Guam, along with the Kitty Hawk and Stennis Carrier Strike Groups, from Aug. 7-14.

August 20, USS Nimitz anchored in Victoria Harbour for a four-day port call to Hong Kong.

September 5, After recently departed Singapore, the Nimitz Carrier Strike Group joined more than twenty other ships from five countries, in the Bay of Bengal, to partcipate in exercise Malabar 2007, from Sept. 4-10. The exercise, stretching from India's eastern coast to the Andamans near Indonesia, will also include USS Kitty Hawk and India's lone aircraft carrier, the INS Viraat.

September 24, CVN 68 CSG departed Pearl Harbor after a two-day port visit. The USS Nimitz crew brought 1,295 special guests aboard for a Tiger Cruise back to San Diego.

September 30, USS Nimitz Carrier Strike Group returned to San Diego after a six-month deployment. During that time, aircraft from Carrier Air Wing Eleven flew 8,240 hours in direct support of operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom.

December 5, The Nimitz is currently underway off the coast of southern California conducting sustainment training exercises.

January 24, 2008 USS Nimitz departed San Diego for a surge deployment under the Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP) and will operate in the western Pacific Ocean in support of U.S. commitments in the region while the forward-deployed USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) undergoes scheduled maintenance in Yokosuka, Japan.

February 9, Four F/A-18 fighter jets intercepted and escorted the Russian Tu-95 bomber as it flew at 2,000 feet above the Nimitz battle group. In total, four Tu-95's were involved. Two remained about 500 miles east of the U.S. ships, and another orbited about 50 miles away.

February 11, CVN 68 pulled into Sasebo, Japan, for a scheduled port visit.

February 28, The Nimitz arrived in Busan, Republic of Korea, to take part in exercise Key Resolve/Foal Eagle 2008, an annual joint exercise involving forces from both the United States and Republic of Korea.

March 16, CO Michael C. Manazir completed his 1,000th career trap landing in a F/A-18F Super Hornet, assigned to VFA-41 "Black Aces." USS Nimitz Carrier Strike Group (CSG) conducted an Expeditionary Strike Force (ESF) exercise with the USS Essex (LHD 2) Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) from March 14-16.

March 29, The Nimitz and Kitty Hawk CSGs are currently conducting combined training exercises in the western Pacific Ocean.

April 6, The aircraft carrier departed Hong Kong after a three-day port call.

April 20, CVN 68 pulled into Apra Harbor, Guam, for a four-day port visit.

June 3, USS Nimitz returned to homeport after more than four-month underway period.

January 16, 2009 The Nimitz is currently conducting flight deck certification after completing a six-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA).

January 21, USS Nimitz departed San Diego for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) Carrier Qualifications off the coast of southern California.

February 18, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier is currently off the West Coast conducting Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA).

March 24, CVN 68 is currently in the Pacific Ocean conducting FRS-CQ.

May 11, USS Nimitz is underway off the coast of southern California, for Composite Training Unit Excercise (COMPTUEX), in preparation for the upcoming deployment.

May 19, An HH-60H Seahawk, from Helicopter Anti Submarine Squadron (HS) 6, crashed at 11.36 p.m., about 15 miles south of Point Loma. Lt. Cmdr. Eric J. Purvis, Lt. Allison M. Oubre, Naval Air Crewman 1st Class Samuel &ldquoGrant&rdquo Kerslake, Naval Air Crewman 2nd Class Aaron L. Clingman and Naval Air Crewman 3rd Class Sean M. Ward were killed. The helicopter had taken off from the Nimitz and was involved in search-and-rescue exercises when it crashed.

June 12, Vice Adm. Richard Hunt relieved Vice Adm. Samuel Locklear, III as Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet, during a change-of-command ceremony abord the Nimitz at Naval Air Station North Island.

July 31, USS Nimitz Carrier Strike Group departed San Diego for a scheduled western Pacific deployment.

August 10, Capt. Bret C. Batchelder, Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11, completed his 1,000th career trap landing in a F/A-18C Hornet, assigned to the "Warhawks" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 97.

August 24, Capt. Paul O. Monger relieved Capt. Michael C. Manazir as CO of USS Nimitz during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship at Fleet Activities Yokosuka (FAY). The aircraft carrier arrived in Japan today for a scheduled port visit.

September 8, The Nimitz arrived in Singapore for a goodwill port call.

September 18, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 launched its first sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, after USS Nimitz CSG relieved USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) CSG on station in the North Arabian Sea.

October 7, A milestone is reached when an EA-6B Prowler, flown by "Black Ravens" XO, Cmdr. Vincent Johnson, became the 100,000th aircraft to launch off Catapult #1.

October 24, USS Nimitz moored at Khalifa Bin Salman Port at Hidd for a port visit to the Kingdom of Bahrain.

November 19, Two F/A-18E Super Hornets from Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 14 and one E-2C Hawkeye from Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 117 were flown from the Nimitz on Nov. 14 to promote U.S. naval aviation at the 11th Dubai International Air Show, Nov. 15-19.

December 4, CVN 68 returned to the North Arabian Sea, to resume combat missions supporting OEF, following a port visit to Jebel Ali.

December 18, Cmdr. Max McCoy relieved Cmdr. Paul Spedero as CO of the "Sidewinders" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 86, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

January 25, 2010 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) CSG relieved the Nimitz Carrier Strike Group as Commander, Task Force 50. Since entering the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Operations, CVW 11 has flown more than 2,600 combat sorties and totaled 15,296 cumulative flight hours.

January 31, USS Nimitz anchored off the coast of Phuket, Thailand, for a four-day liberty port visit.

February 7, The Nimitz pulled into Port Klang, Malaysia, for a liberty port visit to Kuala Lumpur.

February 16, Deputy Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 Capt. Scott Conn reached a milestone by making his 1,000th carrier-arrested landing on board the Nimitz. He is the 325th Naval aviator to successfully complete 1,000 traps.

February 17, The Nimitz CSG arrived in Hong Kong for a scheduled port call.

March 6, Rear Adm. Robert P. Girrier relieved Rear Adm. John W. Miller as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 11, during a change-of-command ceremony on board the USS Nimitz in the Philippine Sea.

March 21, CVN 68 arrived in Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton to bring home members of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 135 and to pick up 1200 "Tigers".

March 26, USS Nimitz returned to homeport after an extended eight-month deployment.

May 21, The Nimitz is currently undergoing a Carrier Incremental Availability (CIA) at Naval Air Station North Island in preparation for the ship's Inspection and Survey (INSURV) in October. INSURV is a major inspection mandated by Congress to assess a ship's material condition, its ability to operate its weapons, radar, engineering and navigation systems, maintain its berthing spaces, and function safely.

July 2, USS Nimitz returned to NAS North Island after a three-day underway for sea trials.

July 12, The Nimitz departed for CQ, with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11, off the coast of southern California.

August 5, CVN 68 is currently conducting a Sustainment Exercise (SUSTEX) with the CVW-11 Returned to NAS North Island on Aug. 20.

August 31, USS Nimitz returned to homeport after a four-day Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ).

September 2, The Nimitz departed San Diego for "blue water" operations with the CVW-11.

September 16, USS Nimitz transferred more than 1,200 tons of ordnance to the USNS Wally Schirra (T-AKE 8), Sept. 14-15, during an ammunition offload Returned home on Sept. 20.

October 5, CVN 68 returned to Naval Air Station North Island after a two-day demonstrations underway period for the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV).

October 22, USS Nimitz departed for a six-day underway to conduct Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications off the coast of southern California.

November 8, The Nimitz returned to homeport after a six days of routine training and CQ with the Training Air Wing One (TRAWING-1) and TRAWING-2.

December 6, USS Nimitz departed San Diego for a 12-month Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility in Bremerton, Wash.

December 9, Just hours after the Nimitz arrived in Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton, the Navy announced that the "administrative" move from Naval Air Station North Island, Calif., will become a permanent homeport change but to Naval Station Everett, Wash., when the aircraft carrier completes a year-long maintenance. USS Nimitz will replace USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) which is scheduled to leave Washington in early fiscal 2012 for a homeport change to Norfolk, Va., for a four-year RCOH.

December 16, CVN 68 completed its move from Naval Base Kitsap to its dry-dock at the PSNS&IMF, an evolution that took more than seven hours to complete. During DPIA, the Nimitz will receive major upgrades to its combat, self-defense, navigation and potable water systems and numerous other components.

July 7, 2011 PSNS&IMF reached a milestone in the USS Nimitz's ongoing maintenance availability with the installation of two new sponsons, structures that project from the aircraft carrier to support a weapon system or antenna array.

September 29, USS Nimitz moved from Dry Dock #6 to Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton's Delta Pier.

March 5, 2012 The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier departed Bremerton for sea trials after wrapping up the 15-month, $239 million worth, DPIA. Departure was delayed two months because more maintenance work was identified.

March 9, USS Nimitz arrived at its new homeport of Naval Station Everett, Wash.

March 29, Capt. Jeffrey S. Ruth relieved Capt. Paul O. Monger as CO of the CVN 68 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

April 19, USS Nimitz pulled into Naval Air Station North Island for an extended port call.

May 7, USS Nimitz departed San Diego for a four-day underway period to conduct ammunition onload with USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7) and Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the elements of CVW-11 and CVW-14 Returned to Everett on May 16.

May 27, The Nimitz anchored in San Francisco Bay for a brief port visit, after a three-day "Tiger Cruise" from Naval Station Everett, to participate in the 75th anniversary of the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge. Returned home on June 1 Underway again from June 4-5.

June 11, USS Nimitz departed Naval Station Everett to participate in annual multi-national exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC), in and around the Hawaiian Islands, from June 29 through Aug. 3.

June 15, CVN 68 departed Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, after embarking members of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11.

June 18, Capt. Gregory N. Harris, Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11, completed his 1,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier with the trap of an F/A-18F assigned to the "Black Knights" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 154.

July 2, The Nimitz pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a four-day port call before participating in at-sea phase of RIMPAC.

July 17, USS Nimitz took on more than 180,000 gallons of alternative fuel, a 50/50 blend of advanced biofuel (HRJ-5) and traditional petroleum-based fuel (JP-5), from USNS Henry J. Keiser (T-AO 187) in preparation for the Navy's Great Green Fleet demonstration.

August 3, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier departed Pearl Harbor after a two-day port call Arrived at NAS North Island on Aug. 9 Underway for FRS-CQ on Aug. 10.

August 15, The flight deck of USS Nimitz tallied it's 300,000th arrested landing with the trap of an E/A-18G Growler, assigned to the "Vikings" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 129 Piloted by Lt. Sergio Armas and Lt. Cmdr. Dan Boyer.

August 20, USS Nimitz returned to homeport after a 70-day underway period.

September 29, CVN 68 departed Naval Station Everett for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX).

October 4, Vice Adm. David H. Buss relieved Vice Adm. Allen G. Myers, IV as Commander, Naval Air Forces during a change-of-command ceremony on board the Nimitz at Naval Air Station North Island.

October 6, An MV-22 Osprey, assigned to the "White Knights" of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 165, landed for the first time on board the USS Nimitz, while the carrier was underway in the SOCAL Op. Area.

October 13, The Nimitz departed NAS North Island after a three-day port call to San Diego for Force Protection Exercise (FPX) Commenced COMPTUEX on Oct. 17.

November 6, An F/A-18E, assigned to the "Argonauts" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147, emergency landed at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, north of San Diego, Calif., after it was unable to land at Naval Air Station North Island due to poor weather in Coronado on Tuesday night.

November 13, USS Nimitz pulled into Naval Air Station North Island to disembark the elements of CVW 11 Returned home on Nov. 19.

November 21, U.S. Navy delayed the scheduled Nimitz's January deployment for at least two-month for emergent repairs to its cooling pumps. USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) will return home in December, three months earlier than originally planned, to resurface its flight deck before departing again for Middle East in February 2013.

February 11, 2013 Rear Adm. Michael S. White relieved Rear Adm. Peter A. Gumataotao as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 11, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Nimitz.

March 30, USS Nimitz departed Everett for a western Pacific and Middle East deployment, nearly three months later than scheduled.

April 2, CVN 68 moored at NAS North Island for a brief port call to embark members of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11. The Nimitz will first participate in a Sustainment Exercise (SUSTAINEX), off the coast of southern California, before heading west Inport San Diego again from April 18-19.

May 11, The Nimitz moored at Busan Naval Base for a two-day port call before participating in a joint exercise with the Republic of Korea Navy.

May 28, USS Nimitz anchored in Makham Bay, Thailand, for a four-day port visit to Phuket Entered the Central Command AoO on June 9.

June 13, Aircraft from CVW-11 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

June 14, Cmdr. Carlos A. Medina relieved Cmdr. Edwin S. Grohe as CO of the "Gray Wolves" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 142, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Nimitz in the North Arabian Sea.

July 4, Cmdr. John W. DePree relieved Cmdr. James L. Christie as CO of the "Black Knights" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 154, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the Arabian Gulf.

July 5, USS Nimitz pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day liberty visit to Dubai.

July 14, Lance Cpl. Benjamin W. Tuttle, attached to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (MVFA) 323, died at the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany after being medically evacuated from the Nimitz while the carrier was inport Jebel Ali.

August 9, CVN 68 moored at Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP) in Hidd, Bahrain, for a four-day port call.

August 13, Cmdr. Thomas F. Foster relieved Cmdr. Peter M. Collins as CO of the "Wolf Pack" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 75, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the Arabian Gulf.

August 28, Capt. Robert R. Osterhoudt, Deputy Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11, and Cmdr. Robert E. Loughran, Jr., the CO of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147, completed their 1,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier, while the Nimitz was underway in the Arabian Sea.

September 2, USS Nimitz Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 11 transited Bab el-Mandeb Strait northbound.

September 22, An MH-60S Knighthawk, assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 6, was swaped over the starboard side, by a "wall of water", shortly after conducted a landing on the deck of USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110), at approximately 12:40 p.m. Bahrain time, in the central Red Sea. Lt. Cmdr. Landon L. Jones and CWO3 Jonathon S. Gibson were lost at sea.

October 20, The Nimitz, escorted by USS Monterey (CG 61), entered the Mediterranean Sea, after transiting Suez Canal for the first time in more than 15-years Participated in an air defense exercise (ADEX) with the FS Chevalier Paul (D621) on Oct. 22.

October 30, USS Nimitz anchored off the coast of Naples, Italy, for a five-day port visit. Transited Strait of Messina on Nov. 5 Transited Suez Canal southbound on Nov. 8.

November 22, Four E-2C Hawkeyes, previously assigned to Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 115 and deployed with the USS George Washington (CVN 73), landed aboard the Nimitz as part of an aircraft transfer between the "Liberty Bells" and "Wallbangers" of VAW-117.

December 3, CVN 68 pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a three-day port call to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise.

December 10, Cmdr. Todd F. Cimicata relieved Cmdr. Robert E. Loughran, Jr., as CO of the "Argonauts" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

December 12, The Nimitz pulled into San Diego for a brief port call to disembark Air Wing elements and some "Tigers."

December 16, USS Nimitz returned to homeport after an eight-and-a-half month deployment in the U.S. 5th, 6th and 7th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR).

March 24, 2014 Rear Adm. Dee L. Mewbourne relieved Rear Adm. Michael S. White as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 11, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Nimitz at Naval Station Everertt.

April 28, The Nimitz departed Naval Station Everett for flight deck certification in the SOCAL Op. Area. Inport NAS North Island from May 1-2 and May 8-9 Returned to Everett on May 12.

June 13, USS Nimitz anchored at Royal Roads Anchorage D, off Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Esquimalt for a three-day port visit to Victoria, British Columbia. The aircraft carrier departed homeport today for a Friends and Family Day Cruise en route to Nanoose torpedo test range in support of CNO project Departed Nanoose Bay, B.C., on June 18 Returned to Everett on June 27 .

July 8, Capt. John C. Ring relieved Rear Adm. Jeffrey S. Ruth as the 17th CO of Nimitz during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

July 11, CVN 68 departed Naval Station Everett for FRS/CVW-11 Carier Qualifications (CQ) in the SOCAL Op. Area. Inport NAS North Island from July 15-16 and July 21-23 Anchored off Santa Cruz, Calif., for a brief stop to conduct anchoring training on July 25.

July 28, The Nimitz moored at Ammunition Pier, Naval Magazine Indian Island in Port Hadlock, Wash., for ammo offload Returned home on July 31 Underway for FRS/CVW-9 CQ on Sept. 5 Inport San Diego from Sept. 8-9.

September 18, USS Nimitz moored at Berth L, Carrier Wharf on Naval Air Station North Island for a four-day port visit to San Diego in conjunction with the 17th annual Fleet Week Coronado Speed Festival Held an "Open House" from Sept. 20-21 Returned home on Sept. 26.

October 14, USS Nimitz departed Everett to participate in a Task Group Exercise (TGEX) with the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) and Japanese Maritime Self Defence Force (JMSDF) ships, off the coast of southern California, from October 20-31 Inport San Diego from Oct. 17-18 and Nov. 1-3.

November 3, The U.S. Navy made aviation history when an F-35C Lightning II, assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 and piloted by Cmdr. Anthony M. Wilson, conducted its first arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier at 12.18 p.m., while the Nimitz was underway southeast of San Clemente Island. Lt. Cmdr. Theodore R. Dyckman was the second test pilot to land the Navy's Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) variant. It was the first of many launch-and-recovery cycles expected to be carried out over the next two weeks with two F-35C unit, as part of the type&rsquos initial at-sea Developmental Testing I (DT-I) period.

November 18, USS Nimitz returned to Naval Station Everett after a five-week underway.

January 13, 2015 The Nimitz moored at Delta Pier, Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton for a 16-month Extended Planned Incremental Availability (EPIA) at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF) Moved to Bravo Pier on Feb. 3.

December 22, U.S. Navy announced that USS Nimitz will remain stationed in its administrative homeport of Bremerton, Wash., through fiscal year 2019 as part of a decision that avoids the possibility of three homeport changes over a four-year period for the ship's crewmembers and families. The aircraft carrier was previously scheduled to return at Naval Station Everett in the summer of 2016 and than head back to Bremerton for a Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) in 2018.

October 5, 2016 USS Nimitz departed Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton for sea trials following an extended 20-month availability.

October 10, The Nimitz moored at Kilo Pier, NAS North Island in San Diego for a four-day port call before conducting flight deck certification and CQ, with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11, off the coast of southern California Moored at Kilo Pier from Oct. 21-22.

From October 23-24, USS Nimitz onloaded more than 2 million pounds of ordnance during an ammunition transfer with the USNS Wally Schirra (T-AKE 8) Moored at Kilo Pier again on Oct. 26 Underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) on Oct. 28 Returned to Bremerton on Nov. 3 Underway again on Nov. 13.

November 17, CVN 68 moored at Berth L, NAS North Island in San Diego Moved to Kilo Pier on Nov. 20 Underway for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Period (FEP) on Nov. 22.

December 12, The Nimitz disembarked 620 CVW-11 Sailors, while underway off the coast of San Diego, via helicopters from HSC-8, HSM-75, and HSM-79 after recently experienced a maintenance issue that could have caused an extension of its schedule had it stoped at NAS North Island to conduct repairs Moored at Delta Pier, Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton on Dec. 15.

January 12, 2017 Capt. Kevin P. Lenox relieved Capt. John C. Ring as CO of the USS Nimitz during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

January 31, USS Nimitz departed Bremerton for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) preparations.

February 3, The Nimitz moored at Kilo Pier, Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego Underway for INSURV rehearsal from Feb. 8-9 Underway for INSURV assessment from Feb. 14-15 Underway for FRS-CQ on Feb. 19 Brief stop at Kilo Pier on Feb. 23 Returned to Bremerton on Feb. 26.

March 13, USS Nimitz departed Delta Pier, Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton to participate in a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) Moored at Kilo Pier, NAS North Island from March 16-17 and March 27-29.

From April 24-25, the Nimitz was moored at Kilo Pier again to disembark the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 personnel Returned to Bremerton on April 28.

June 1, USS Nimitz departed Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

June 4, The Nimitz moored at Kilo Pier, NAS North Island for a one-day port call to embark the CVW-11 personnel.

June 15, Cmdr. Michael E. Madrid relieved Cmdr. John C. Kiefaber as CO of the "Wolf Pack" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 75, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Nimitz.

June 17, The Nimitz CSG recently arrived off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii, to participate in Undersea Warfare Exercise (USWEX) 17-2 Departed Hawaiian Op. Area on June 21.

Frmo June 28-29, the aircraft from CVW-11 practiced bombing runs on Farallon de Medinilla, approximately 45 n.m. from Saipan in the Northern Marianas.

July 3, USS Nimitz Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 11 transited the Surigao Strait southbound Transited the Singapore Strait westbound on July 6.

July 9, The Nimitz anchored off the coast of Chennai, India, for the in-port phase of a trilateral exercise Malabar 2017 Underway for at-sea phase on July 14.

July 16, A F/A-18F Super Hornet (Bureau #166883), assigned to the Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 154, suffered a Class "A" mishap after its engine borescope plug backed out in flight causing hot air to burn to engine bay and aircraft skin.

July 17, USS Nimitz CSG participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the JS Izumo (DDH 183), JS Sazanami (DD 113), INS Vikramaditya (R33), INS Ranvir (D54), INS Shivalik (F47), INS Sahyadri (F49), INS Kamorta (P28), INS Kirpan (P44) and INS Kora (P61), while underway in the Bay of Bengal at the conclusion of exercise Malabar.

July 23, USS Nimitz, along with the USS Princeton (CG 59) and USS Shoup (DDG 86), transited the Strait of Hormuz northbound.

July 25, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.

July 31, Capt. Michael T. Spencer relieved Capt. Robert D. Westendorff as CO of CVW-11 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

August 12, A F/A-18E Super Hornet (Bureau #165865), assigned to the Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 146, suffered a Class "A" mishap following an emergency landing at the Bahrain International Airport. Due to the malfunction, the aircraft could not be stopped on the runway and the pilot ejected safely.

August 26, USS Nimitz moored at Berth 6 in Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP), Bahrain, for a four-day liberty visit to Manama after 86 consecutive days at sea.

September 8, USS Nimitz, along with the USS Princeton, participated in a Group Sail exercise with the FS Jean Bart (D615) and HMAS Newcastle (FFG 06), while underway in the Arabian Gulf Conducted Group Sail with the FS Auvergne (D654) and FS Jean Bart on Sept. 19.

September 26, USS Nimitz moored at Berth 58/59, Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day liberty visit to Dubai.

October 4, Rear Adm. Gregory N. Harris relieved Rear Adm. William D. Byrne, Jr., as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 11 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the CVN 68.

October 22, USS Nimitz recently transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound. While on station in the North Arabian Gulf (NAG), the aircraft carrier launched 1322 combat sorties and delivered 903 pieces of ordnance on targets in Iraq and Syria, in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.

October 28, USS Nimitz anchored off Colombo, Sri Lanka, for a three-day port visit, first by U.S. aircraft carrier since USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) in November 1985 Transited the Singapore Strait eastbound on Nov. 4 Transited the Luzon Strait eastbound on Nov. 8 Transited the Korean Strait northbound on Nov. 11.

November 12, The Nimitz participated in two photo exercise (PHOTOEX), with the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) CSG, USS Ronald Regan (CVN 76) CSG, JS Ise (DDH 182), JS Inazuma (DD 105), JS Makinami (DD 112), ROKS Sejong The Great (DDG 991), ROKS Yu Seoung Ryoung (DDG 993) and four other ROK Navy ships, as a "show of force" in the Sea of Japan Transited the Korean Strait southbound on Nov. 14.

November 16, Cmdr. Patrick S. Corrigan relieved Cmdr. Christopher A. Papaioanu as CO of the "Argonauts" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147, during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

From November 20-21, the Nimitz conducted ammunition offload with the USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7), while transiting the Pacific Ocean eastbound.

November 25, USS Nimitz moored at Pier H3/H4 on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, for a four-day port visit and to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise Moored at Kilo Pier, NAS North Island from Dec. 5-6.

December 10, USS Nimitz moored at Bravo Pier on Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton after more than a six-month deployment.

January 16, 2018 General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Co.-Bremerton was awarded a $33,2 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-14-C-4321) to exercise an option for repair and alteration requirements for the USS Nimitz's Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA). Work is expected to be completed by May 2019.

March 1, USS Nimitz entered the Dry Dock #6 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF) Undocked and moored at Bravo Pier on Dec. 5.

May 28, 2019 USS Nimitz moored at Delta Pier on Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton after a four-day underway for sea trials Underway again on June 20.

June 24, The Nimitz moored at Kilo Pier on Naval Air Station North Island for a one-day port call before conducting flight deck certification and carrier qualifications with the CVW-17 in the SOCAL Op. Area Moored at Berth Lima from July 3-9 Conducted FRS-CQ from July 10-20 Moored at Berth Lima again for a brief stop on July 21 Returned home on July 24.

August 1, Capt. Maximilian Clark relieved Capt. Kevin P. Lenox as the 19th CO of Nimitz during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

September 16, USS Nimitz departed Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton for a Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) in the SOCAL Op. Area Moored at Berth L, NAS North Island from Sept. 19-20.

September 28, Logistics Specialist Seaman Juan Jose Garcia-Herrera died early Saturday morning at the University of California San Diego Regional Trauma Center after he fell from a lowered aircraft elevator, at just after 9 p.m. on Friday, aboard the Nimitz.

October 1, The Nimitz departed Naval Air Station North Island after an extended six-day port visit to San Diego Returned home on Oct. 4 Underway again on Oct. 21.

From October 22-24, the Nimitz conducted ammunition onload with the USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10), while underway approximately 50 n.m. west of Quinault Reservation, Washington Returned home on Oct. 25 Underway for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) on Nov. 11.

November 15, USS Nimitz moored at Kilo Pier on Naval Air Station North Island for a one-day port call to embark personnel from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 Conducted operations approximately 50 n.m. southwest of Monterey, Calif., on Nov. 23 Moored at Kilo Pier again from Dec. 11-12 Returned to Bremerton on Dec. 16.

January 11, 2020 The Nimitz departed homeport for routine training in the SOCAL Op. Area Moored at Kilo Pier on NAS North Island from Jan. 14-15 and Jan. 16-18 Conducted FRS-CQ from Jan. 18-22 Moored at Kilo Pier again from Jan. 23-24 and Jan. 28-29.

February 7, The Nimitz moored at Kilo Pier on NAS North Island for a four-day port call, to disembark the CVW-17 personnel, after a nine-day underway for Group Sail Underway for Mid-Cycle Material Assessment (MCMA) with the INSURV from Feb. 11-12 Moored at Kilo Pier again from Feb. 12-15.

February 18, USS Nimitz moored at Ammunition Pier, Naval Magazine Indian Island in Port Hadlock, Wash., for a three-day ammo onload Moored at Delta Pier in Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton on Feb. 21.

April 27, USS Nimitz departed Bremerton for a scheduled deployment. The CSG-11 will first participate in a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), off the coast of southern California Moored at Kilo Pier on Naval Air Station North Island from May 1-6.

May 16, Rear Adm. James A. Kirk relieved Rear Adm. Yvette M. Davids as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 11 during a brief ceremony on board the Nimitz, while underway in the SOCAL Op. Area.

June 3, The Nimitz moored at Berth L on Naval Air Station North Island for a five-day port call Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Yukon (T-AO 202), while transiting westbound north of Hawaiian Islands, on June 14 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Matthew Perry (T-AKE 9), while underway northeast of Guam, on June 22.

June 23, USS Nimitz, along with the USS Princeton (CG 59), USS Sterett (DDG 104) and USS Ralph Johnson (DDG 114), participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) and USS Russell (DDG 59), while underway as a "show of force" in the Philippine Sea.

June 24, USS Nimitz moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a four-day liberty port visit Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS John Ericsson (T-AO 194) on July 1.

July 6, USS Nimitz CSG participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), USS Antietam (CG 54) and USS Mustin (DDG 89), while underway as a "show of force" in the South China Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Tippecanoe (T-AO 199) on July 7 Transited the Luzon Strait eastbound on July ?.

July 13, The Nimitz conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7), while underway in the Philippine Sea Transited the Surigao Strait southbound on July 14 Transited the Balabac Strait westbound on July 15 Transited the Strait of Singapore on July 18 Transited the Malacca Strait northbound from July 18-19 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS John Ericsson on July 19.

July 20, USS Nimitz CSG participated in a PHOTOEX with the INS Rana (D52), INS Shivalik (F47), INS Sahyadri (F49) and INS Kamorta (P28), while underway northwest of Sumatra Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Wally Schirra (T-AKE 8), while underway off the southwest coast of India, on July 24.

July 29, CVN 68 conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE 6), while underway in the North Arabian Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Wally Schirra on Aug. 2 and 10th Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Yukon (T-AO 202) on Aug. 11 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Amelia Earhart on Aug. 14 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Yukon on Aug. 19.

September 1, The Nimitz conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Matthew Perry (T-AKE 9), while underway in the North Arabian Sea Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Ian McKnight was lost at sea on Sept. 6.

September 9, USS Nimitz moored at General Cargo Terminal in Port of Duqm, Oman, for a four-day port call Transited the Strait of Hormuz northbound on Sept. 18.

September 22, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 recently launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, while the Nimitz was underway in the Arabian Gulf.

October 7, USS Nimitz moored at Berth 6 in Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP), Bahrain, for a four-day port call Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Matthew Perry on Oct. 12 and 24th.

October 27, Capt. Elaine A. Collins relieved Capt. Todd E. Whalen as Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Nimitz, while underway in the Arabian Gulf.

October 31, The Nimitz conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Leroy Grumman (T-AO 195), while underway in the Arabian Gulf Moored at Berth 6 in KBSP, Bahrain, from Nov. 4-8 Transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound on Nov. 9 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Matthew Perry on Nov. 11 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Yukon on Nov. 13.

November 17, USS Nimitz participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Princeton, USS Sterett, INS Vikramaditya (R33), INS Kolkata (D63), INS Chennai (D65), INS Talwar (F40), JS Murasame (DD 101), HMAS Ballarat (FFH 155), INS Khanderi (2017) and INS Deepak (A50), commencing the phase II of annual exercise Malabar 2020, while underway in the Arabian Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Amelia Earhart, while underway west of Sumatra, on Nov. 24.

December 2, The Nimitz recently arrived on station in the North Arabian Sea after being previously scheduled to return home by Christmas Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Carl Brashear and USNS Yukon on Dec. 6 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Matthew Perry on Dec. 13.

December 21, USS Nimitz CSG arrived off the northeast coast of Somalia in support of Operation Octave Quartz Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Carl Brashear on Dec. 29 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Yukon, while underway in the North Arabian Sea, on Jan. 4 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Carl Brashear on Jan. 13.

January 14, 2021 The Nimitz conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Matthew Perry, while underway in the North Arabian Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Yukon on Jan. 21 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Carl Brashear on Jan. 28 Transited the Malacca Strait southbound from Feb. 4-5 Transited the Strait of Singapore eastbound on late Friday afternoon.

February 9, USS Nimitz CSG participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), USS Russell (DDG 59), USS John Finn (DDG 113) and USS John S. McCain (DDG 56), while underway as a "show of force" off the northwest coast of Philippines Transited the Verde Island Passage eastbound on late Tuesday afternoon Transited the San Bernardino Strait northbound on Feb. 10.

February 13, The Nimitz conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Matthew Perry Arrived off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii, on Feb. 19 Arrived off the coast of San Diego on Feb. 25 Moored at Kilo Pier on NAS North Island from Feb. 26-28 Moored at Ammunition Pier on Naval Magazine Indian Island for ammo offload from March 4-7.


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Product Description

USS Bremerton CA 130

Westpac Cruise

May 1954 - October 1954 Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Bremerton CA 130 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: Long Beach, Hawaii, Yokosuka, Sasebo, Kobe, Osaka, Kyota, Hakodate, Yokohama Tokyo and Hong Kong.
  • Brief History of the USS Bremerton
  • Tenth Anniversary
  • Ships Itinerary (Ports and Dates)
  • Divisional Group Photos with Names
  • Many Crew Activity Photos
  • Plus Much More

Over 207 Photos on Approximately 115 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Cruiser during this time period.

Additional Bonus:

  • Several Additional Images of the Bremerton (National Archives)
  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.


    Service history

    1946 – 1947

    Following shakedown cruise, Frontier spent the remainder of 1946 servicing various units of the 1st Fleet. Her maiden overseas tour took her to the Far East where she acted with Service Division 32 at Yokosuka from January to May 1947. She underwent inactivation at Long Beach, California and was decommissioned 29 September 1947.

    The First Fleet was a numbered fleet of the United States Navy, in operation from as early as 1946 to 1 February 1973 in the western Pacific Ocean as part of the Pacific Fleet. In 1973, it was disestablished and its duties assumed by the Third Fleet.

    The Far East is a geographical term in English that usually refers to East Asia, the Russian Far East, and Southeast Asia. South Asia is sometimes also included for economic and cultural reasons. The term "Far East" came into use in European geopolitical discourse in the 12th century, denoting the Far East as the "farthest" of the three "easts", beyond the Near East and the Middle East. Likewise, in Qing Dynasty of the 19th and early 20th centuries the term "Tàixī (泰西)" – i.e. anything further west than the Arab world – was used to refer to the Western countries.

    United States Fleet Activities Yokosuka or Commander Fleet Activities Yokosuka is a United States Navy base in Yokosuka, Japan. Its mission is to maintain and operate base facilities for the logistic, recreational, administrative support and service of the U.S. Naval Forces Japan, Seventh Fleet and other operating forces assigned in the Western Pacific. CFAY is the largest strategically important U.S. naval installation in the western Pacific. As of August�, it was commanded by Captain David Glenister.

    1951 – 1968

    On 11 November 1951 Frontier was recommissioned with Captain E. B. Patterson in command, and fitted out for service with United Nations forces in Korea. She embarked Commander, Destroyer Flotilla 3, on 21 May 1952 at San Diego and thereafter steamed to Yokosuka where she provided services for various units, and logistic support to the 7th Fleet until December. After an overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, she weighed anchor for her third overseas tour in the western Pacific. Again she provided tender services for ships of the 7th Fleet, principally at Yokosuka, and acted as flagship of Destroyer Flotilla 3. She returned to Long Beach on 20 December 1953.

    The United Nations (UN) is an intergovernmental organization that was tasked to maintain international peace and security, develop friendly relations among nations, achieve international co-operation and be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations. The headquarters of the UN is in Manhattan, New York City, and is subject to extraterritoriality. Further main offices are situated in Geneva, Nairobi, and Vienna. The organization is financed by assessed and voluntary contributions from its member states. Its objectives include maintaining international peace and security, protecting human rights, delivering humanitarian aid, promoting sustainable development and upholding international law. The UN is the largest, most familiar, most internationally represented and most powerful intergovernmental organization in the world. In 24 October 1945, at the end of World War II, the organization was established with the aim of preventing future wars. At its founding, the UN had 51 member states there are now 193. The UN is the successor of the ineffective League of Nations.

    Korea is a region in East Asia. Since 1948, it has been divided between two distinct sovereign states: North Korea and South Korea. Korea consists of the Korean Peninsula, Jeju Island, and several minor islands near the peninsula. Korea is bordered by China to the northwest, Russia to the northeast, and neighbours Japan to the east by the Korea Strait and the Sea of Japan.

    San Diego is a city in the U.S. state of California. It is in San Diego County, on the coast of the Pacific Ocean in Southern California, approximately 120 miles (190 km) south of Los Angeles and immediately adjacent to the border with Mexico.

    During February, 1954 she engaged in Pacific training exercises and maneuvers with TG 12.3. These were followed by refitting at Long Beach and departure for the Far East for a tour which lasted until 7 December 1954 when she sailed for home. Frontier provided services to the various units in the Long Beach area through May 1955. On 19 June she departed for Yokosuka where she embarked Commander, Destroyer Flotilla 3, and performed her vital functions. Another period of overhaul at San Francisco was succeeded by Far Eastern deployment which saw Frontier flagship of Commander Destroyer Flotilla Western Pacific (8 October 1956 – 25 March 1957). Departing Long Beach on 3 February 1958, she sailed via Pearl Harbor to Melbourne, Australia and numerous other ports of call where she tended units of the fleet.

    Pearl Harbor is a lagoon harbor on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, west of Honolulu. It has been long visited by the Naval fleet of the United States, before it was acquired from the Hawaiian Kingdom by the U.S. with the signing of the Reciprocity Treaty of 1875. Much of the harbor and surrounding lands is now a United States Navy deep-water naval base. It is also the headquarters of the United States Pacific Fleet. The U.S. government first obtained exclusive use of the inlet and the right to maintain a repair and coaling station for ships here in 1887. The attack on Pearl Harbor by the Empire of Japan on December 7, 1941, was the immediate cause of the United States' entry into World War II.

    Frontier again cruised in eastern waters from 16 September 1959 to 1 March 1960. On 15 March 1960 she became flagship of Destroyer Flotilla 3, remaining at Long Beach to provide services until 28 January 1961 when she sailed for Pearl Harbor.

    Frontier was decommissioned 28 June 1968 at Naval Station San Diego, California struck from the Naval Register 1 December 1972, after which time she was transferred to the Maritime Administration for disposal. Frontier was sold by MARAD on 1 July 1974, fate unknown.

    Naval Base San Diego, which locals refer to as 32nd Street Naval Station, is the second largest Surface Ship base of the United States Navy and is located in San Diego, California. Naval Base San Diego is the principal homeport of the Pacific Fleet, consisting of over 50 ships and over 190 tenant commands. The base is composed of 13 piers stretched over 977 acres (3.95 km 2 ) of land and 326 acres (1.32 km 2 ) of water. The total on base population is over 24,000 military personnel and over 10,000 civilians.


    堪培拉号重巡洋舰 (CA-70)

    1941年9月3日,匹兹堡号在马萨诸塞州昆西的伯利恒钢铁公司福尔河造船厂开工。建造期间,为纪念在萨沃岛战役中表现英勇的皇家澳大利亚海军堪培拉号重巡洋舰,美国总统富兰克林·D·罗斯福希望能以同名来命名美国军舰。匹兹堡号被选中并更名为堪培拉号 [1] 。1943年4月19日,堪培拉号在澳大利亚驻美国大使欧文·狄克森的妻子艾丽斯·狄克森夫人的主持下下水,是美国唯一一艘以外国军舰或城市命名的军舰 [2] 。1943年10月14日,堪培拉号入役。作为回报,澳大利亚政府将一艘新的部落级驱逐舰命名为巴丹号,以此纪念美军在巴丹战役中的表现。

    第二次世界大战 编辑

    1944年1月 [3] ,在诺曼·斯科特号驱逐舰的护卫下,堪培拉号离开波士顿,经圣迭戈前往珍珠港,加入第58特遣舰队 [3] 。2月底,堪培拉号在埃内韦塔克战役中提供了炮火支援 [3] [4] 。3月和4月间,堪培拉号加入约克敦号航空母舰特遣队,并在3月31日至4月1日空袭帕劳群岛、雅浦岛和沃莱艾环礁的行动提供支援 [3] 。4月13日,堪培拉号为荷兰迪亚和瓦克德岛的两栖登陆战提供护卫 [3] 。4月29日至5月1日,堪培拉号加入企业号航空母舰战斗群对特鲁克群岛的空袭行动,并被单独派遣去轰击位于萨塔万环礁的日军航空基地 [3] 。5月,堪培拉号参加了对南鸟岛和威克岛的袭击。6月,又参加了马里亚纳群岛和帕劳群岛战役 [3] 。作为这场战役的一部分,堪培拉号还参加了菲律宾海战役并袭击了小笠原群岛上的日军機場 [3] 。8月和9月间,堪培拉号参加了对帕劳和菲律宾袭击行动,并为莫罗泰战役提供支援 [3] 。

    10月初,堪培拉加入第38特遣队,为登陆莱特岛进行备战 [3] 。10月13日,日军飞机空投的鱼雷击中堪培拉号 [3] [4] ,爆炸造成23人死亡,机炉舱被毁,舰艇失速 [3] 。威奇托号重巡洋舰将堪培拉号拖到与芒西号拖船的汇合点,由后者接管拖船任务 [5] 。经过一周的行进,芒西号与军舰管理局租借的一艘拖船汇合 [5] 。又经过一周,两艘拖船将堪培拉号带到阿贾克斯号修理船所在地 [5] 。经过暂时修理后,堪培拉号自行回到波士顿海军工厂 [3] 。1945年2月至10月,堪培拉号一直在船厂进行修理 [4] 。战争结束前,堪培拉号被布署到美国西海岸。 [3]

    波士顿级改装 编辑

    1947年3月7日,堪培拉号退役,停泊在华盛顿州布雷默顿的普吉特海湾海军造船厂和中级维修设施内 [4] 。1952年1月4日,堪培拉号及其姊妹舰波士顿号重巡洋舰被拖往新泽西州卡姆登的纽约造船公司,接受改装,成为波士顿级导弹巡洋舰 [3] [4] ,軍艦舷號也更換為CAG-2,成為美國海軍第一批次服役的飛彈重巡洋艦。整个改装工程于1956年6月结束。

    改装后 编辑

    1956年6月15日,堪培拉号重新服役,母港为弗吉尼亚州诺福克 [3] 。1957年3月14日,堪培拉号运送美国总统德怀特·D·艾森豪威尔前往百慕大与英国首相哈罗德·麦克米伦会见 [3] 。在完成7月和8月的训练后,堪培拉号被派往地中海参加北大西洋公约组织举行的海上军演 [3] 。


    Watch the video: China angry Oct 10: US Nuclear Submarine Hits Chinese Secrets Object in the South China Sea Region (January 2022).