Information

Kline APD-120 - History


Kline

Stanley Fly Kline was born 15 November 1901 in Graterford, Pa., and enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve 2 February 1927. He began active duty 13 July 1942, and was assigned to Britsh warship Hartland, former U.S. Coast Guard cutter Pontchartrain, as a member of an antisabotage party.

On November 8, as Hartland entered Oran Harbor, Algeria, the ship came under heavy fire from enemy ships and shore batteries. When a shell exploded in a compartment occupied by the boarding party, the survivors found themselves trapped by fire and fumes. Kline, crawling through a small overhead hatch and worming his way along the deck under a hail of shells and machine gun fire, opened a large hatch and assisted 42 men to safety. He then turned to loading ammunition clips for an automatic rifle and continued his heroic conduct with complete disregard of his own safety until killed by a shell explosion. Kline was posthumously awarded the Silver Star Medal for his conspicuous gallantry.

(APD-120: dp. 1,390; 1. 306' ; b. 37'; dr. 12'7"; s. 23.6 k. cpl. 204; a. 15", 6 40mm.; 6 20mm., 2 dct.; el. Crosley)

Kline (DE-687), was launched 27 June 1944 by the Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass.; sponsored by Mrs. Hazel Kline, widow; redesignated APD-120 on 17 July; and commissioned 18 October 1944, Lt. B. F. Urban, USNR, in command.

While en route to shakedown, 6 November 1944, Kline rescued nine survivors from Navy dirigible K-34 which had been forced down in a storm. Completing her Bermuda shakedown the high-speed transport cleared Norfolk 24 December for the Pacific. Upon arriving Pearl Harbor 20 January 1945, Kline trained underwater demolition teams until sailing 14 February for Leyte. Intensive preinvasion exercises were completed in the Philippines before the transport arrived off Okinawa 26 March. Kline's underwater demolition team cleared the approaches to the island, "the last stepping stone" on the road to Japan. After the main invasion force landed 1 April, Kline remained in the area as radar and ASW picket. Her guns also assisted in splashing an enemy aircraft on 1 April and helped down another on the 6th.

She departed Okinawa area 16 April and for the next 6 weeks underwent training and repairs. Sailing from Borneo 2 June, Kline provided close fire support during the invasion of Brunei Bay, Borneo on 10 June and 2 weeks later her underwater demolition unit gave valuable service during the invasion of Balikpapan. The highspeed transport departed Indonesian waters 7 July and, sailing via the Carolines and Marshalls, arrived Oceanside, Calif., 5 August.

Following the cessation of hostilities Kline sailed for Japan, arriving Sasebo 20 September to commence underwater reconnaissance missions. After similar operations at Nagasaki she returned San Diego 19 October to prepare for "Magic-Carpet" service. Kline made 1 cruise to Pearl Harbor and returned 110 Pacific veterans to San Diego 19 November. Two days later she sailed for the East Coast, arriving Norfolk 5 December. On 28 January Kline arrived Green Cove Springs, Fla., where she decommissioned 10 March 1947 and joined the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. Kline was struck 15 January 1966 and on 22 February sold to Nationalist China under the Military Assistance Program.

Kline received two battle stars for World War II service.


Construction and commissioning [ edit | edit source ]

Kline was laid down as the Rudderow-class destroyer escort USS Kline (DE-687) on 27 May 1944 by the Bethlehem Steel Company at Quincy, Massachusetts, and was launched on 27 June 1944, sponsored by Mrs. Hazel Kline, the widow of the ship ' s namesake, Stanley F. Kline. Kline was reclassified as a Crosley-class high-speed transport and redesignated APD-119 on 17 July 1944. After conversion for her new role, she was commissioned on 18 October 1944 with Lieutenant B. F. Urban, USNR, in command.


Service history

World War II

While en route to shakedown at Bermuda on 6 November 1944, Kline rescued nine survivors from the U.S. Navy K-class blimp K-34, which had been forced down in a storm. Completing her shakedown, Kline cleared Norfolk, Virginia, on 24 December 1944 for World War II service in the Pacific.

Upon arriving at Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, on 20 January 1945, Kline trained underwater demolition teams until departing on 14 February 1945 for Leyte in the Philippine Islands. Intensive pre-invasion exercises were completed in the Philippines before Kline arrived off Okinawa on 26 March 1945. Kline ' s underwater demolition team cleared the approaches to the island. After the main invasion force landed on Okinawa on 1 April 1945, Kline remained in the area in support of the Okinawa campaign as radar and antisubmarine warfare picket. Her guns also assisted in shooting down a Japanese aircraft on 1 April 1945 and helped down another on 6 April 1945.

Kline departed the Okinawa area on 16 April 1945 and for the next six weeks underwent training and repairs. Departing for Borneo on 2 June 1945, Kline provided close fire support during the invasion of Brunei Bay on Borneo on 10 June 1945, and on 24 June 1945 her underwater demolition team gave valuable service during the invasion of Balikpapan.

Kline departed Netherlands East Indies waters on 7 July 1945 and, sailing via the Caroline Islands and Marshall Islands, arrived at Oceanside, California, on 5 August 1945.

Postwar

Following the surrender of Japan and end of World War II on 15 August 1945, Kline departed California for Japan, arriving at Sasebo, Japan, on 20 September 1945 to commence underwater reconnaissance missions. After similar operations at Nagasaki, Japan, she returned to the United States at San Diego, California, on 19 October 1945 to prepare for Operation Magic Carpet -- the seaborne postwar repatriation of American serviceman from overseas -- service. Kline made one Magic Carpet cruise to Pearl Harbor and returned 110 Pacific veterans to San Diego on 19 November 1945.

On 21 November 1945 Kline departed San Diego for the United States East Coast, arriving at Norfolk on 5 December 1945. On 28 January 1946, Kline arrived at Green Cove Springs, Florida, for inactivation.


King Oliver

Sidney Janis Gallery, New York
Isobel and I. Donald Grossman, New York, circa 1958
Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
Private collection, Paris
C & M Arts, New York
Private collection, San Francisco
Acquired from the above by the present owner

Teeming with the frenetic energy of the buzzing metropolis, Franz Kline’s dynamic paintings emerge as the archetypes of Twentieth Century New York action painting. Evoking the fast cars, rising girders and rampant nightlife, Kline’s canvases are emblematic of the vibrant cultural downtown scene of the 1950s. Channeling various modern elements into a new heroic form of painting, Kline and his contemporaries thrived on the vivacious jazz scene, and like their musical counterparts took an active stance in the improvisational creation of their art. A complete embodiment of the energy, drama and freedom of this seminal decade in the history of American Art, the surfaces of Kline’s paintings clearly demonstrate the importance of the moment, of the gesture and of the artist’s own vigorous movements, putting brush to canvas.

A brilliant and complex fusion of strokes and pigments, Kline’s King Oliver emerges as a blaze of inspiration garnered from the free-improvisational and vivacious spirit of the 1950s New York urban jazz scene. A totemic and empowered action painting, the monumentality and energy of Kline’s signature black and white brushstrokes burst from the canvas as the rare addition of vibrant yellow, red, blue, green and purple pigments permeate the work with the distinguished mark of a master colorist. Singled out by historian Harry Gaugh in the first full-length study on the artist, Gaugh attests: “The massive King Oliver, a cacophony of slatted and buckling color, stands as a joyous monument to the great jazz musician, affirming at the same time the range of Kline’s figural implications. Important as one of his most accomplished color works, it is also his only mature color painting to declare openly a figural identity. Other canvases with significant color only allude to figures, and these are relatively few” (H. Gaugh, The Vital Gesture: Franz Kline, exh, cat., Cincinnati Art Museum, 1985).

Marking a pivotal moment in Kline’s career, the reintroduction of color—usually bright and unmodulated—undeniably works against the received opinion that white and black dominated the artist’s interests. While Kline reputedly had color on his palette when working on his stark black and white paintings, colored canvases too filled his closets and lined the walls of his studio. From his figurative work in 1930s and 1940s through to his biomorphic paintings and into his artistic maturity, Kline produced chromatic abstractions with the force and engagement of a committed colorist.

While the contemporary critics often denounced this new appearance of color as a risky move, there is no doubt that Kline’s career was undoubtedly on the rise. By this time he was included both nationally and internationally in the Americans exhibitions curated by Dorothy C. Miller at the Museum of Modern Art, alongside both friends and fellow artists, Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman and Clyfford Still. However, more notably, he moved from Charles Egan Gallery and began showing his work with Sidney Janis in 1956. With this heightened visibility and greater acclaim, at the behest of Janis, Kline turned from commercial enamel to artists’ tube paints (for which the gallery paid), lending to Kline’s intensified investigations into color.

And while the artist cautioned his dealer stating, “If I can’t do more with color than I can with black and white I won’t use it” (F. Kline, quoted by Sidney Janis, 1978). The action painter took on the challenge of using color to attack his canvas with the same intensity as before subsequently producing an extraordinary combination of dynamism and gravitas, which previously only his black and white paintings were thought to possess. Adding visual complexity and structure to his composition, King Oliver consists of numerous vectors and strong diagonals that contribute to Kline’s distinct appearance of tautness and vitality. Working in concert with his signature black and white, the vibrant hues carve out a dynamic sense of space within the picture and highlight the strong gestural marks forcibly made by the artist. While the apparent brushwork of each mark appears spontaneously rendered, the complexity of the overall image unites the construction of the brushwork in true architectural fashion.

Though Kline was commonly known to be ambivalent to a defined sense of “style,” his work decidedly possessed one, and his implementation of color was distinctly his own. “Kline’s color, in which purples and reds, yellows, oranges and greens clash for dominance, isn’t like anyone else’s,” Abstract Expressionist critic and historian, April Kingsley described. “Kline loved Matisse, but his color does’t have the sparkling Mediterranean limpidity of the French master. Instead, some of New York City’s grime, the gritty matter with which its inhabitants are constantly showered and which seem to have solidified and in Kline’s blacks, clings to his color” (A. Kingsley, “The Turning Point,” C. Christov-Bakargiev (ed.), Franz Kline: 1910 - 1962, exh. cat., Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Rivoli-Turin, 2004, p. 390).

Entrenched with the grit of his city, his heroic brushwork and seemingly spontaneous gestures combined with his vivacious and fervent use of color, King Oliver is a supreme manifestation of the celebrated grandeur of the artist’s signature style. An artist who was as engrossed in the urban culture of New York—included among his friends and bar buddies, besides artists were jazz musicians, writers, collectors, neighborhood drunks, starstruck art students, and the beat (and not-so-beat) poets—as he was in his own art, Dore Ashton fondly remembered, “I have always thought he had style in the way the term was used by a jazz trumpeter I once heard who, after a long improvisational digression, waved his instrument and shouted exultingly, ‘Man, I got style I ain’t even used yet!’” (D. Ashton, “Kline as he was and as he is,” ibid., p. 28 - 30). Alluding to Kline’s reinvigorated style, Ashton’s assertion further recalls the zeitgeist of the 1940s and 1950s downtown culture. Indeed, King Oliver itself is an eponymous homage to the jazz musician himself.

An American jazz cornet player and bandleader, Joe “King” Oliver became popular during the 1920s in Chicago and New Orleans. Taking great interest in the alteration of his horns sound, King Oliver pioneered the use of mutes, which he unceremoniously fashioned out of rubber plumber’s plunger, derby hats, bottles and cups in order to gain a wider range. A talented composer, he wrote many tunes that are still regularly played today including, “Sweet Like This,” “Canal Street Blues,” “Doctor Jazz” and “Dipper Mouth Blues,” which became an early nickname for his younger protégé, Louis Armstrong. Remembering Oliver as “Papa Joe,” Armstrong considered him his mentor, idol and inspiration, stating in his own autobiography, Satchmo: My Life in New Orleans, “It was my ambition to play as he did. I still think that if it had not been for Joe Oliver, Jazz would not be what it is today. He was a creator in his own right” (L. Armstrong, Satchmo: My Life in New Orleans, New York, 1986, p. 99).

Engaged in an art-making process that was both active and interactive, the Abstract Expressionists, namely Kline and Pollock, like their musical counterparts composed as they painted or played. Engrossing themselves in a “dance” around their respective canvases, they became staunchly devoted to the improvisational process. In describing her husband Jackson Pollock’s love of the music, the artist Lee Krasner has explained that Pollock “would get into grooves of listening to his jazz records—not just for days—day and night, day and night for three days running until you though you would climb the roof! … Jazz? He thought it was the only other really creative thing happening in this country” (L. Krasner, quoted in, M. Hadler, “Jazz and the New York School,” K. Gabbard (ed.), Representing Jazz, Chapel Hill, 1995, p. 248). Indeed, noting that Pollock was “in the same state I was in and doing what I was doing,” Ornette Coleman, and originator of free-form jazz, openly recognized the reciprocity between artist and musician (Ibid.). Keeping his radio tuned to WEVD, where he would pick up Symphony Sid after bar hours, Kline appreciated more traditional jazz and named four paintings—King Oliver, Lester, Bigard and Hampton—after the mainstream musicians, Joe “King” Oliver, Lester Young, Barney Bigard and Lionel Hampton respectively. Identifying with both their unorthodox working procedures and their out-side-of-the-establishment status, Kline approached his canvases like a soloist to their instrument, entering the composition, developing it and exiting without finishing off its possibilities. “Every nerve was enlisted while he was at work,” Dore Ashton remembers. “His emphasis on ‘feeling’ as the proper criterion for a painter was not casual. Those great diagonals he favored reflected his inner rhythms, his own way of vaulting into the grand spaces he envisioned. How endemic to his whole being those diagonal trajectories were can be gauged by the way he danced…He had an impulse to shoot out into space, to slam through a wilderness of black and white and reach a climax of total freedom…He dances as he paints, beating out an idiosyncratic rhythm over sustained periods, and then suddenly, and with élan, breaks the rhythm dramatically by shooting out one foot in a precipitous accent grave movement” (D. Ashton, op cit., p. 28).

Embracing a reductive approach into complete abstraction, Kline’s work stood apart from the creations of his Abstract Expressionist contemporaries as a purely gestural approach to painting. Unlike Rothko or Newman for example, there was nothing transcendental about Kline’s work. Nor was he, like Pollock or Rothko, invoking an inner state of being, psychology or state of mind. Rather, he was only attempting to transmit something hitherto unexpressed and unknown through the material properties of the painter’s art. “Instead of making a sign you can read,” he said, “you make a sign you can’t read” (Franz Kline, quoted in Franz Kline Art and the Structure of Identity, exh. cat., Whitechapel Art Gallery, London, 1994, p. 57). In fact, of all the great Abstract Expressionist artists, Kline was the least influenced by Surrealism. Indeed, of all these artists, he was perhaps also the least modern. His work had little to do with any extension of Cubism or the invocation of archetypes from depth of man’s soul or psyche. The product of an extremely conventional training in figurative drawing and painting at the Heatherly School of Art in London, Kline cited his influences as being those of Tintoretto, Rembrandt, Velazquez and Goya, rather than the more usually referred to Cézanne, Picasso, Matisse or Mondrian.
And yet, when discussing the addition of color to Kline’s painting in the 1950s, one must consider Kline’s close relationship with de Kooning, who considered Kline to be his “best friend.” Together they ruled the artistic intelligentsia on Tenth Street and captivated and influenced a younger generation of artists with their inimitable yet accessible styles. In 1955, de Kooning reverted to painting strictly abstract pictures after painting his iconic series of Women, but this time, he turned to bright, undiluted colors. His paintings like Police Gazette and Gotham News include energetic slashes of red and blue paints and built-up layers of yellow paint. While de Kooning may not have been a direct influence—and indeed, unlike de Kooning, Kline was not “slipping glimpses” of reality into his paintings—his new work was known to Kline. Further, in John Elderfield’s comprehensive catalogue that coincided with the Museum of Modern Art’s seminal retrospective on Willem de Kooning, Jennifer Field points out, “The calligraphic qualities of Ruth’s Zowie and de Kooning’s use of black in Bolton Landing connect these paintings to the works Franz Kline made through the 1950s. Around this time, Kline himself began incorporating color into his collages and paintings like Bolton Landing, his monumental King Oliver features a palette of yellow, orange and blue intercepted by strong black verticals and horizontals” (J. Field, “Full Arm Sweep,” J. Elderfield, de Kooning: a Retrospective, exh. cat., Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2011, p. 320). For Kline, the nature of his painting did not change with the addition of color. He had once stated, “An area of strong blue or the interrelationship of two different colors is not the same thing as black and white. In using color, I never feel I want to add to or decorate a black and white painting. I simply want to feel free to work both ways.”


The Arehart Family

Mike Arehart became the owner of Kline’s in 1979. Sam Fletcher stayed on for an additional year to teach him the ropes. Bess Kline also stayed on and became a wonderful friend and teacher to Mike. Over the years, Mike has added some new flavors and products. He has stayed very loyal to the Kline’s philosophy of quality. Now Mike’s sons work in the business as well. Mike owns both of the store locations in Harrisonburg.

Kim Arehart began working for her brother as a young teen in the shop. After going to college and pursuing a professional career, she opened up a Kline’s store in Staunton, VA in 1997. Since then, Kim has added Hog Wild BBQ to the Staunton location and opened another Kline’s store in Waynesboro, VA in 2008.


Kline’s History

Established in 1943, John Kline began Kline’s Frozen Custard with the help of his father, Grover Kline, in Downtown Harrisonburg, Virginia.

The ice cream stand was located in the first floor of the family’s house and customers were served through a walk up window.

Special Flavors

Downtown Harrisonburg
Chocolate Peanut Butter*

Main Street Harrisonburg
Black Raspberry*

McGaheysville
Chocolate Peanut Butter and Key Lime Pie*

Staunton
Chocolate Peanut Butter and Raspberry

Waynesboro
Oreo and Strawberry Shortcake

*Flavors subject to change on Wednesday

Attention Customers:

Some of our products contain peanuts, pecans, walnuts, milk, and various other products that may cause an allergic reaction. We make every effort to keep these products separated. However, we cannot guarantee that products are free from all allergens. If you have any questions, please call any of our locations and request to speak with a manager.


The Exiles

A powerful, emotionally resonant novel that captures the hardship, oppression, opportunity and hope of four women’s lives—three English convicts and an orphaned Aboriginal girl—in nineteenth-century Australia.

Christina Baker Kline has established herself as a novelist who plumbs noteworthy but little-known facets of the past, and The Exiles marks her third foray into the genre. While Orphan Train and A Piece of the World were grounded in American history, The Exiles makes a bold geographic and cultural leap, and confirms Christina’s place among the finest talents writing today.

While most English convicts transported to Australia were men, 25,000 were women. Christina explores the development of Australia from a fresh perspective, telling the story of this fascinating, blood-soaked land and its legacy with the grace, beauty, empathy, and insight—and the rich, full-bodied characters—that are the hallmarks of her work.

“Master storyteller Christina Baker Kline is at her best in this epic tale of Australia’s complex history—a vivid and rewarding feat of both empathy and imagination. I loved this book.” — Paula McLain, New York Times Bestselling author of The Paris Wife

The story

Seduced by her employer’s son, Evangeline, a naïve young governess in early nineteenth-century London, is discharged when her pregnancy is discovered and sent to the notorious Newgate Prison. After months in the fetid, overcrowded jail, she learns she is sentenced to “the land beyond the seas,” Van Diemen’s Land, a penal colony established by Great Britain. Though uncertain of what awaits, Evangeline knows one thing: the child she carries will be born on the months-long voyage to this distant land.

During the journey on a repurposed slave ship, the Medea , Evangeline strikes up a friendship with Hazel, a girl little older than her former pupils who was sentenced to seven years transport for stealing a silver spoon. Canny where Evangeline is guileless, Hazel — a skilled midwife and herbalist – is soon offering home remedies to both prisoners and sailors in return for a variety of favors.

Though Australia has been home to Aboriginal people for more than 50,000 years, the British government in the 1840s considers its fledgling colony uninhabited and unsettled, and views the natives as an unpleasant nuisance. By the time the Medea arrives, many of them have been forcibly relocated, their land seized by white colonists. One of these relocated people is Mathinna, the orphaned daughter of the Chief of the Lowreenne tribe, who has been adopted by the new governor of Van Diemen’s Land.

In this gorgeous novel, Christina Baker Kline brilliantly recreates the beginnings of a new society in a beautiful and challenging land, telling the story of Australia from a fresh perspective, through the experiences of Evangeline, Hazel, and Mathinna. While life in Australia is punishing and often brutally unfair, it is also, for some, an opportunity: for redemption, for a new way of life, for unimagined freedom. Told in exquisite detail and incisive prose, The Exiles is a story of grace born from hardship, the unbreakable bonds of female friendships, and the unfettering of legacy.

Instant New York Times Bestseller
Publishers Weekly Bestseller
USA Today Bestseller
Indie Next Bestseller

Interviews with CBK for THE EXILES

Reviews of The Exiles

“Monumental. This episode in history gets a top-notch treatment by Kline, one of our foremost historical novelists. This fascinating 19th-century take on Orange Is the New Black is subtle, intelligent, and thrillingly melodramatic.” — Kirkus (starred), 8/19/20

“A tour de force of original thought, imagination and promise … Kline takes full advantage of fiction — its freedom to create compelling characters who fully illuminate monumental events to make history accessible and forever etched in our minds.” — Houston Chronicle, 8/3/2020

“Although men are credited for “discovering” and “taming” Australia, they play a very small role in this 19th-century-set novel from Kline (A Piece of the World), which tells of the women’s stories—not only that of the convicts, but also those who came freely, and, most important, those who were there first—the Aboriginal people. Both uplifting and heartbreaking, this beautifully written novel doesn’t flinch from the ugliness of the penal system but celebrates the courage and resilience of both the first peoples and the settlers who came after, voluntarily or not, to create a new home for themselves and their children.” — Library Journal (starred), 7/17/2020

“In the gripping latest from Kline (Orphan Train), three women try to carve out lives in mid-19th-century colonial Australia…. The women, all brought to their new lives against their wills, become a lens through which to see the development of colonial Australia. Filled with surprising twists, empathetic prose, and revealing historical details, Kline’s resonant, powerful story will please any historical fiction fan.” — Publishers Weekly, 7/1/2020

“As in Orphan Train, Kline deftly balances tragedy and pathos, making happy endings hard-earned and satisfying … Book groups will find much to discuss, such as the uses of education, both formal and informal, in this moving work.” — Booklist, 6/30/2020


Laststandonzombieisland

Here at LSOZI, we are going to take off every Wednesday for a look at the old steam/diesel navies of the 1833-1946 period and will profile a different ship (or unit) each week. These ships have a life, a tale all their own, which sometimes takes them to the strangest places.- Christopher Eger

Warship Wednesday, July 3, 2019: The Frogmen of Balikpapan

U.S. National Archives 80-G-274676 via NHHC

Here, on a special WW where we take a break from an actual warship, we see a group of young U.S. Navy Underwater demolition personnel of UDT-18 aboard the fast transport (converted destroyer) USS Kline (APD-120) watching as Army B-25 bombers of the 13th Bomber Command plaster the Operation OBOE 2 invasion beaches off Balikpapan, Borneo circa 3 July 1945– 74 years ago today. They are waiting for orders to leave their boat to clear underwater obstacles to go clear the beach to allow allied Australian troops to land. While the Pacific War would be over in less than two months, these frogmen, many of which are on their first mission, could not know that was looming and they had a Japanese-held beach to clear of obstacles.

According to Lt. JG C.F. Waterman, who took these amazing pictures, “Things looked rather bad at the moment and everyone was thoroughly scared.”

Originally formed in May 1943 as Naval Combat Demolition Units (NCDU), teams were created to clear beach obstacles in enemy-held areas. During the Torch Landings in North Africa, a group of Navy salvage personnel with a one-week crash course in demo hit the beaches but it was obvious that a more dedicated force would be needed. That led to LCDR Draper L. Kauffman’s efforts to train teams ready to go ashore to clear a path. By Normandy, 34 NCDU teams would land on D-Day, suffering 53 percent casualties. They would repeat their efforts in the Dragoon Landings in Southern France in August 1944.

Meanwhile, in the Pacific, nine dedicated Underwater Demolition Teams were formed, largely from Seabees with a smattering of Marines, to work across Japanese-held atolls. First hitting Kwajalein on 31 January 1944, the Pacific teams initially were dressed for land combat like many of the NCDU members in Europe, with uniforms, boots, M1 helmets, and small arms in addition to their demo charges.

Underwater demolition team members boarding a landing craft off Saipan. Note belt equipment, life belt equipment, life belt and M-1 carbine of man in right-center. His shirt indicates that he is a member of UDT-6. Photographed by Commander Bonnie Powell. 80-G-274665

This soon changed as men skipped down to their swim trunks and swam on night missions to map the beaches before the landings. This later morphed into standard gear.

A model of the typical late-war 1944-45 UDT swimmer shown at the SEAL/UDT Museum in Ft. Pierce. Note the dive mask, boots for use on coral, swim trunks, emergency life belt, demo bag, fins, and knife. Around his chest is a pencil to use on a board for drawing his section of the beach. Around his right wrist is a plumb for measuring depth and distance. (Photo: Chris Eger)

Across Peleliu, the Philippines, Guam, and Iwo Jima, UDTs left their mark and went in first to guide the landing craft in and make a hole for them to hit the beach if needed.

A UDT (Underwater Demolition Team) explosive charge blows up an underwater obstacle off Agat Beach, Guam, during the invasion of that island, July 1944 80-G-700639

By Okinawa, no less than eight full teams with 1,000 frogmen were utilized. There the nearly naked combat recon swimmers used aluminum paint (yikes!) to camouflage their skin against Japanese snipers– and to help insulate against the chilly Northern Pacific waters which could quickly lead to hypothermia.

Okinawa UDT members daubed aluminum paint on their bodies as camouflage to throw off Japanese marksmen. Photographed on the fantail of a fast transport (APD), circa Spring 1945 80-G-274695

Japanese Army type 93 anti-tank mine in the sand of Tinian Island. This mine was nicknamed a “tape measure” by UDT men due to its shape

A selection of Japanese mines found and defused on Iwo Jima. USMC photo.

Japanese Type 4 anti-landing mines, Iwo Jima island, February 1945, with their horns removed. Buried in the low-tide surf line, party favors like this waited for Allied landing craft across the Pacific

The Balikpapan assault

Balikpapan would be the swan song of WWII frogmen ops with the final UDT demolition operation of the war on 3-4 July 1945, as the swimmers UDT-11 and UDT-18 removed their helmets and slid over the side of their landing craft before paddling to destiny in broad daylight.

Under the watchful eyes of Gen. MacArthur, whose flagship was just offshore, the frogmen, armed just with knives and demo charges, first mapped the beaches and then helped clear them, coming within range of Japanese mortars and small arms.

Balikpapan was to be no walkover, as the roughly 2,000 Japanese regulars there (augmented by 3,000 local Indonesian conscripts) defended the beaches well and, while they did not have Rommel’s Atlantikwall complete with Belgian Gates and Czech Hedgehogs, they did have thousands of punji stakes to impale infantry, mines, fougasse oil traps to burn men alive, wire obstacles, log barriers to hole landing craft, and the like.

Beach invasion spikes Posts were sunk in the sand, 2 feet and interlocked with barbed wire. Balikpapan, Borneo, 4 July 1945

Off-shore log barricade on the beach at Balikpapan, Borneo.

Underwater demolition swimmers, awaiting the signal to enter the water, watch American planes strafe the invasion beach, 3 July 1945. 80-G-274677

An underwater demolition swimmer checks his swim fins and face mask, during UDT operations at Balikpapan, 3 July 1945. The name on his trunks is “Hopper”. Photographed by Lieutenant Junior Grade C.F. Waters. Note tattoos. 80-G-274693

The above frogman, William DeWolf Hopper Jr. , served with the Navy as a volunteer with the Office of Strategic Services in addition to his UDT work. As a member of UDT 10, he participated in operations on Peleliu, Anguar Island, and the Occupation of Ulithi in addition to the Invasion of Leyte, earning a Bronze Star. Originally from New York, Hopper reluctantly returned to California after the war and went on to have a career in Hollywood in the late 1950s and 1960s.

Although he is best known for his role in the series Perry Mason as PI Paul Drake, his other credits include the series Gunsmoke and the movie Rebel Without a Cause. William Hopper passed in 1970 at the age of 55.

An underwater demolition team’s LCPR leaves its fast transport (APD), towing a rubber boat, 3 July 1945. This shows the way the rubber boat is positioned for UDT swimmer discharge and pickups in a method still used 75 years later. The machine guns of the LCPR are the only direct support the swimmers had– and they were typically out of range by the time the swimmers closed with the beach. Photographed by Lieutenant Junior Grade C.F. Waters. 80-G-274700

UDT swimmers prepare to recover their gear and swim towards their objective area, after being dropped off by a landing craft. The photograph released circa 31 August 1945. It may have been taken during the Balikpapan Invasion that July. 80-G-274690

Underwater demolition swimmer prepares for pickup after he had completed his work off the Balikpapan beaches, 3 July 1945. A pickup boat is a rubber raft towed alongside a powerboat. Photographed by Lieutenant Junior Grade C.F. Waters. 80-G-274701

Recovery of a UDT swimmer, using a rubber raft towed alongside a powerboat. Note swimmer’s life belt, sheath knife, beach markers, and other equipment. The photo released on 31 August 1945. It may have been taken during the Balikpapan operation early in July. 80-G-274683

Underwater demolition team swimmers wait in the rain to be taken aboard their fast transport, off Balikpapan, 3 July 1945. The swab mounted on the stern of their LCP(R) means “Clean sweep, day’s work done”. They are watching casualties going aboard from another LCP(R). The boat is from USS KLINE (APD-120). Photographed by Lieutenant Junior Grade C.F. Waterman. 80-G-274686

Amazingly, the UDT teams at Balikpapan only suffered one, non-fatal, injury.

Underwater demolition swimmer, SF1c John Regan gets a drink and smoke after setting charges off Balikpapan, circa early July 1945. Note his sheath knife 80-G-274698

Ensign S.E. Lanier holds the nose of a Japanese 37mm shell which hit but did not pierce, his helmet. Photographed released 31 August 1945. It may have been taken during the Balikpapan Invasion, early that July. 80-G-274691

Underwater demolition swimmers, MoM2c G.J. Bender, rests on board his UDT fast transport after working near the invasion beach, 3 July 1945. He is covered with oil, which was thick on the water near the beach. Note the boots. Photographed by Lieutenant Junior Grade C.F. Waterman. 80-G-274678

With the path cleared by UDT-18, 7th Australian Division troops come ashore from landing craft during landing near Balikpapan oil fields in Borneo. Some 33,000-strong combined Australian and Royal Netherlands (KNIL) troops would land in OBOE 2, the largest ever amphibious assault by Australian forces.

As for our frogmen, it was expected that if they would have hit the beaches at Honshu in late 1945, a mission they were detailed to until the A-bombs intervened, the men of UDT-18 would have suffered 100 percent casualties.

As it was, their unit was disestablished 3 November 1945, at Coronado.

At the SEAL/UDT Museum in Fort Pierce, where NCDU’s and UDTs were formed and trained in WWII, they have a massive 7-foot long model of the old USS Kline on display and a statue of an era frogman dedicated to the “naked warriors” of Balikpapan and all the other beaches in which their brothers landed.

USS Kline (APD-120) at Seal Museum Fort Pierce (Chris Eger)

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Kline APD-120 - History

This is a complete list of all Fore River Shipyard production, listed in order by Fore River hull number. Small repair or overhaul jobs that were not assigned hull numbers are not included. During this period the yard was under the ownership of Bethlehem Steel.

This list was compiled and is maintained by Andrew Toppan, using sources listed at the bottom of the document.

The first column is the Fore River hull number, followed by the vessel's name, the type/size/class of the vessel, the owner/customer for the vessel, the type of work done (new construction, overhaul, etc.), the date the vessel was delivered, and the fate or status of the vessel. For ships that remain in existence the current name is listed in the status/fate column if no name is listed, the vessel retains its original name.

For conversions and reconditionings, the vessel's new name (at completion) is listed under "name", the original name and description are listed under "type", and the nature of the conversion is listed under "work type".

Fore River Shipyard Production Record
Hull Name Type/Descr. Owner Work Type Delivered Fate or Status
1398 Charles G. Donoghue 174' Harbor Ferry City of Boston New 23 Sept 1926 Unknown
1399 Daniel A. MacCormack 174' Harbor Ferry City of Boston New 21 Oct 1926 Unknown
1400 Massachusetts
(BB 54)
South Dakota Class Battleship US Navy New -- Cancelled 17 Aug 1923
1401 Governor Carr 150' Harbor Ferry Jamestown & Newport Co. New 14 Feb 1927 Unknown
1402 No. 65 360' Carfloat New York, New Haven & Hartford Ry New 17 Jan 1927 Unknown
1403 No. 66 360' Carfloat New York, New Haven & Hartford Ry New 9 Feb 1927 Unknown
1404 No. 67 360' Carfloat New York, New Haven & Hartford Ry New 9 Apr 1927 Unknown
1405 No. 68 360' Carfloat New York, New Haven & Hartford Ry New 9 Apr 1927 Unknown
1406 Unknown
1407 Unknown
1408 Cities Service No. 2 212' Tank Barge Cities Service Co. New 20 Apr 1927 Unknown
1409 Cities Service No. 3 150' Tank Barge Cities Service Co. New 23 Aug 1927 Unknown
1410 Northampton
(CL 26)
Northampton Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 15 May 1930 Torpedoed 30 Nov 1942
1411 Chelan
(WPG 45)
Lake Class Cutter US Coast Guard New 20 Aug 1928 Discarded 1947
1412 Pontchartrain
(WPG 46)
Lake Class Cutter US Coast Guard New 10 Oct 1928 Lost 8 Nov 1942
1413 Tahoe
(WPG 47)
Lake Class Cutter US Coast Guard New 31 Oct 1928 Discarded 1947
1414 Champlain
(WPG 48)
Lake Class Cutter US Coast Guard New 12 Jan 1929 Discarded 1948
1415 Mendota
(WPG 49)
Lake Class Cutter US Coast Guard New 16 Mar 1929 Torpedoed 31 Jan 1942
1416 Edward F. Farrington 131' Coastal Freighter Middlesex Transp. Co. New 22 Feb 1928 Unknown
1417 New Bedford 210' Coastal Passenger Steamer New England Steamship Co. (NY,NH&H Ry.) New 19 May 1928 Abandoned 1968
1418 Virginia Lee 302' Passenger Steamer Pennsylvania RR New 25 Oct 1928 Scrapped 1968
1419 Shawmut 122' Trawler Massachusetts Trawler Co. New 5 Nov 1928 Unknown
1420 Trimount 122' Trawler Massachusetts Trawler Co. New 19 Nov 1928 Discarded 1946
1421 William J. O'Brien 122' Trawler Massachusetts Trawler Co. New 18 Dec 1928 Unknown
1422 Berwindglen 367' Collier Wilmore Steamship Co. New 23 July 1929 Barged 1950 Scrapped 1954
1423 Berwindvale 367' Collier Wilmore Steamship Co. New 21 Aug 1929 Scrapped 1952
1424 Naushon 250' Coastal Passenger / Freight Steamer New England Steamship Co. (NY,NH&H Ry.) New 20 May 1929 Scrapped 1974
1425 Seaboard No. 1 165' Tank Barge Seaboard Shipping Corp. New 19 June 1929 Unknown
1426 No-Nox 209' Tank Barge Gulf Refining Co. New 20 Aug 1929 Unknown
1427 Quincy 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 18 Dec 1929 Unknown
1428 Dorchester 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 6 Jan 1930 Unknown
1429 Winthrop 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 26 Dec 1929 Unknown
1430 Portland
(CA 33)
Portland Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 15 Feb 1933 Scrapped 1969
1431 Cities Service No. 4 200' Tank Barge Cities Service Co. New 20 Nov 1929 Unknown
1432 Borinquen 429' Freighter New York & Porto Rico Co. New 20 Feb 1931 Wrecked 13 Apr 1970
1433 Dartmouth 110' Trawler General Seafoods Corp. New 27 Jan 1930 Unknown
1434 Amherst 110' Trawler General Seafoods Corp. New 7 Feb 1930 Unknown
1435 Cornell 110' Trawler General Seafoods Corp. New 15 Feb 1930 Unknown
1436 L.T.C. No. 1 201' Tank Barge Lake Tankers Corp. New 30 May 1930 Unknown
1437 L.T.C. No. 2 201' Tank Barge Lake Tankers Corp. New 13 June 1930 Unknown
1438 Virginia Sinclair 435' Tanker Sinclair Navigation Co. New 20 Dec 1930 Torpedoed 10 Mar 1943
1439 Harry F. Sinclair Jr. 435' Tanker Sinclair Navigation Co. New 28 Feb 1931 Torpedoed 11 Apr 1942
1440 Mariposa 631' Passenger Liner Oceanic Steamship Co. New 14 Dec 1931 Scrapped 1974
1441 Monterey 631' Passenger Liner Oceanic Steamship Co. New 29 Apr 1932 Laid Up ( Belofin I )
1442 L.T.C. No. 3 201' Tank Barge Lake Tankers Corp. New 1 July 1930 Unknown
1443 General Sumner 174' Harbor Ferry City of Boston New 6 Jan 1931 Unknown
1444 Antigua 447' Freighter United Mail Steamship Co. New 1 Apr 1932 Scrapped 1964
1445 Quirigua 447' Freighter United Mail Steamship Co. New 4 June 1932 Scrapped 1964
1446 Veragua 447' Freighter United Mail Steamship Co. New 5 Aug 1932 Scrapped 1964
1447 Lurline 631' Passenger Liner Oceanic Steamship Co. New 5 Jan 1933 Scrapped 1987
1448 Farragut
(DD 348)
Farragut Class Destroyer US Navy New 18 June 1934 Scrapped 1947
1449 Vincennes
(CA 44)
New Orleans Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 24 Feb 1937 Torpedoed 9 Aug 1942
1450 Quincy
(CA 39)
New Orleans Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 9 June 1936 Torpedoed 9 Aug 1942
1451 Phelps
(DD 360)
Porter Class Destroyer Leader US Navy New 26 Feb 1936 Scrapped 1947
1452 Clark
(DD 361)
Porter Class Destroyer Leader US Navy New 20 May 1936 Scrapped 1946
1453 Moffett
(DD 362)
Porter Class Destroyer Leader US Navy New 28 Aug 1936 Scrapped 1947
1454 Balch
(DD 363)
Porter Class Destroyer Leader US Navy New 20 Oct 1936 Scrapped 1946
1455 Thomas Whalen 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 9 Oct 1934 Unknown
1456 Atlantic 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 25 Oct 1934 Unknown
1457 Plymouth 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 29 Oct 1934 Unknown
1458 Gridley
(DD 380)
Gridley Class Destroyer US Navy New 24 June 1937 Scrapped 1947
1459 Craven
(DD 382)
Gridley Class Destroyer US Navy New 2 Sept 1937 Scrapped 1947
1460 Wasp
(CV 7)
Wasp Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 25 Apr 1940 Torpedoed 15 Sept 1942
1461 Neptune 110' Trawler Neptune Trawling Co. New 1 Sept 1936 Unknown
1462 Triton 110' Trawler Triton Trawling Co. New 16 Sept 1936 Unknown
1463 Goethals 476' Hopper Dredge US Army Corps of Engineers New 28 Dec 1937 Unknown
1464 Annapolis 147' Trawler General Seafoods New 19 Oct 1937 Unknown
1465 West Point 147' Trawler General Seafoods New 29 Oct 1937 Unknown
1466 Yale 147' Trawler General Seafoods New 26 Nov 1937 Unknown
1467 Panama 493' Freighter Panama RR Co. New 21 Apr 1939 Scrapped 1985
1468 Ancon 493' Freighter Panama RR Co. New 16 June 1939 Scrapped 1973
1469 Cristobal 493' Freighter Panama RR Co. New 11 Aug 1939 Scrapped 1981
1470 Benson
(DD 421)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 25 July 1940 Discarded 1975
1471 Mayo
(DD 422)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 18 Sept 1940 Discarded 1970
1472 Wave 147' Trawler General Seafoods New 18 Nov 1938 Discarded 1945
1473 Crest 147' Trawler General Seafoods New 20 Dec 1938 Unknown
1474 Exporter 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 28 Sept 1939 Scrapped 1971
1475 Explorer 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 16 Nov 1939 Scrapped 1970
1476 Exchange 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 23 Feb 1940 Unknown
1477 Express 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 18 Apr 1940 Unknown
1478 Massachusetts
(BB 59)
South Dakota Class Battleship US Navy New 12 May 1942 Preserved @ Fall River
1479 San Diego
(CL 53)
Atlanta Class Antiaircraft Cruiser US Navy New 10 Jan 1942 Scrapped 1960
1480 San Juan
(CL 54)
Atlanta Class Antiaircraft Cruiser US Navy New 28 Feb 1942 Scrapped 1962
1481 Exemplar 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 1 Aug 1940 Unknown (USS Dorothea L. Dix (AP 67))
1482 Exhibitor 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 5 Sept 1940 Unknown
1483 Executor 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 22 Oct 1940 Unknown (USS Almaack (AKA 10))
1484 Examiner 473' C3 Freighter American Export Lines New 23 Jan 1942 Unknown
1485 Stanvac Calcutta 501' Tanker Petroluem Shipping Co. (Standard Vacuum Co.) New 1 May 1941 Sunk 6 June 1942
1486 Stanvac Capetown 501' Tanker Petroluem Shipping Co. (Standard Vacuum Co.) New 27 June 1941 Scrapped 1960
1487 Stanvac Manila 501' Tanker Petroluem Shipping Co. (Standard Vacuum Co.) New 1 Aug 1941 Torpedoed 23 May 1943
1488 Sinclair Opaline 471' Tanker Sinclair Refining Co. New 16 Aug 1941 Scrapped 1961
1489 Sinclair Rubilene 471' Tanker Sinclair Refining Co. New 20 Sept 1941 Scrapped 1959
1490 Sinclair Superflame 471' Tanker Sinclair Refining Co. New 7 Nov 1941 Scrapped 1966
1491 Sinclair H-C 471' Tanker Sinclair Refining Co. New 6 Jan 1942 Discarded 1980's
1492 Flagship Sinco 529' Tanker Sinclair Refining Co. New 30 Jan 1942 Scrapped 1970
1493 Sheldon Clark 529' Tanker Sinclair Refining Co. New 28 Mar 1942 Scrapped 1973
1494 Baltimore
(CA 68)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 15 Apr 1943 Discarded 1971
1495 Boston
(CA 69)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 30 June 1943 Scrapped 1975
1496 Canberra
(CA 70)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 14 Oct 1943 Scrapped 1980
1497 Quincy
(CA 71)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 15 Dec 1943 Discarded 1973
1498 Vincennes
(CL 64)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 21 Jan 1944 Target 28 Oct 1969
1499 Pasadena
(CL 65)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 8 June 1944 Discarded 1970
1500 Springfield
(CL 66)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 8 Sept 1944 Discarded 1978
1501 Topeka
(CL 67)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 23 Dec 1944 Scrapped 1975
1502 Providence
(CL 82)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 14 May 1945 Discarded 1978
1503 Mancester
(CL 83)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 25 Oct 1946 Scrapped 1960
1504 Pittsburgh
(CA 72)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 9 Oct 1944 Discarded 1973
1505 Saint Paul
(CA 73)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 16 Feb 1945 Discarded 1978
1506 Columbus
(CA 74)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 8 June 1945 Discarded 1976
1507 Helena
(CA 75)
Baltimore Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 3 Sept 1945 Discarded 1974
1508 Lexington
(CV 16)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 17 Feb 1943 Preserved @ Corpus Christi
1509 Bunker Hill
(CV 17)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 24 May 1943 Scrapped 1974
1510 Wasp
(CV 18)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 24 Nov 1943 Scrapped 1973
1511 Hancock
(CV 19)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 15 Apr 1944 Discarded 1976
1512 Cohasset 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 9 Oct 1941 Unknown
1513 Lynn 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 22 Oct 1941 Unknown
1514 Salem 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 6 Nov 1941 Unknown
1515 Weymouth 110' Trawler R. O'Brien & Co. New 26 Nov 1941 Unknown
1516 Bancroft
(DD 598)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 30 Apr 1942 Discarded 1971
1517 Barton
(DD 599)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 29 May 1942 Torpedoed 13 Nov 1942
1518 Boyle
(DD 600)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 15 Aug 1942 Discarded 1971
1519 Champlin
(DD 601)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 12 Sept 1942 Discarded 1971
1520 Nields
(DD 616)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 15 Jan 1943 Discarded 1971
1521 Ordronaux
(DD 617)
Benson Class Destroyer US Navy New 13 Feb 1943 Discarded 1971
1522 LST 361 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 16 Nov 1942 Scrapped 1947
1523 LST 362 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 23 Nov 1942 Torpedoed 2 March 1944
1524 LST 363 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 30 Nov 1942 Scrapped 1948
1525 LST 364 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 7 Dec 1942 Lost 2/1945
1526 LST 365 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 14 Dec 1942 Discarded 1947
1527 LST 366 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 21 Dec 1942 Scrapped 1947
1528 LST 367 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 29 Dec 1942 Scrapped 1948
1529 LST 368 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy for Royal Navy New 4 Jan 1943 Destroyed 16 June 1948
1530 LST 369 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 8 Jan 1943 Discarded 1947
1531 LST 370 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 13 Jan 1943 Discarded 1947
1532 LST 371 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 16 Jan 1943 Discarded 1947
1533 LST 372 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 23 Jan 1943 Scrapped 1947
1534 LST 373 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 27 Jan 1943 Discarded 1947
1535 LST 374 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 29 Jan 1943 Discarded 1947
1536 LST 375 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 2 Feb 1943 Scrapped 1949
1537 LST 376 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 5 Feb 1943 Torpedoed 9 June 1944
1538 LST 377 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 8 Feb 1943 Scrapped 1948
1539 LST 378 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 10 Feb 1943 Discarded 1947
1540 LST 379 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 12 Feb 1943 Scrapped 1948
1541 LST 380 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 15 Feb 1943 Discarded 1946
1542 LST 381 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 15 Feb 1943 Scrapped 1947
1543 LST 382 LST 1 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 18 Feb 1943 Discarded 1948
1544 Oregon City
(CA 122)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 15 Feb 1946 Discarded 1970
1545 Albany
(CA 123)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 14 June 1946 Scrapped 1990
1546 Rochester
(CA 124)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 19 Dec 1946 Discarded 1973
1547 Northampton
(CA 125)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945 Discarded 1977
1548 Cambridge
(CA 126)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945
1549 Bridgeport
(CA 127)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945
1550 Kansas City
(CA 128)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945
1551 Tulsa
(CA 129)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945
1552 Weber
(DE 675)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 30 June 1943 Target 15 July 1962
1553 Schmitt
(DE 676)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 24 July 1943 Discarded 1976
1554 Frament
(DE 677)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 15 Aug 1943 Discarded 1960
1555 Harmon
(DE 678)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 31 Aug 1943 Scrapped 1967
1556 Greenwood
(DE 679)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 25 Sept 1943 Scrapped 1967
1557 Loeser
(DE 680)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 10 Oct 1943 Target 1960's
1558 Gillette
(DE 681)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 27 Oct 1943 Scrapped 1973
1559 Underhill
(DE 682)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 15 Nov 1943 Torpedoed 24 July 1945
1560 Henry R. Kenyon
(DE 683)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 30 Nov 1943 Scrapped 1970
1561 DeLong
(DE 684)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 31 Dec 1943 Target 19 Feb 1970
1562 Coates
(DE 685)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 24 Jan 1944 Target 19 Sept 1971
1563 Eugene E. Elmore
(DE 686)
Buckley (TE) Class Destroyer Escort US Navy New 4 Feb 1944 Scrapped 1969
1564 Kline
(APD 120)
Crosley Class High Speed Transport US Navy New 18 Oct 1944 In Service (Taiwanese Shou Shan )
1565 Raymon W. Herndon
(APD 121)
Crosley Class High Speed Transport US Navy New 3 Nov 1944 Discared 1976
1566 Scribner
(APD 122)
Crosley Class High Speed Transport US Navy New 20 Nov 1944 Scrapped 1967
1567 Alex Diachenko
(APD 123)
Crosley Class High Speed Transport US Navy New 8 Dec 1944 Scrapped 1975
1568 Horace A. Bass
(APD 124)
Crosley Class High Speed Transport US Navy New 21 Dec 1944 Scrapped 1975
1569 Wantuck
(APD 125)
Crosley Class High Speed Transport US Navy New 30 Dec 1944 Scrapped 1958
1570 Philippine Sea
(CV 47)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 3 May 1946 Scrapped 1971
1571 Des Moines
(CA 134)
Salem Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 15 Nov 1948 Stricken 1991 Pending Disposal
1572 Salem
(CA 139)
Salem Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New 9 May 1949 Preserved @ Quincy
1573 Dallas
(CA 140)
Salem Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 10 June 1946
1574 CA 141 Salem Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 7 Jan 1946
1575 CA 142 Salem Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945
1576 Joseph P. Kennedy Jr.
(DD 850)
Gearing Class Destroyer US Navy New 14 Dec 1945 Preserved @ Fall River
1577 Rupertus
(DD 851)
Gearing Class Destroyer US Navy New 8 Mar 1946 Discarded 1995
1578 Leonard F. Mason
(DD 852)
Gearing Class Destroyer US Navy New 28 June 1946 In Service (Taiwanese Sui Yang )
1579 Charles H, Roan
(DD 853)
Gearing Class Destroyer US Navy New 12 Sept 1946 Scrapped 1995
1580 LST 1004 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 28 Mar 1944 Scrapped 1947
1581 LST 1005 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 6 Apr 1944 Wrecked 1946
1582 LST 1006 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 12 Apr 1944 Discarded 1948
1583 LST 1007 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 15 Apr 1944 Discarded 1946
1584 LST 1008 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 18 Apr 1944 Discarded 1946
1585 LST 1009 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 22 Apr 1944 Discarded 1946
1586 LST 1010 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 25 Apr 1944 In Service (South Korean Un Bong )
1587 LST 1011 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 28 Apr 1944 Scrapped 1948
1588 LST 1012 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 30 Apr 1944 Discarded 1946
1589 LST 1013 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 2 May 1944 Discarded 1946
1590 LST 1014 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 5 May 1944 Discarded 1946
1591 LST 1015 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 7 May 1944 Discarded 1946
1592 LST 1016 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 10 May 1944 Scrapped 1948
1593 LST 1017 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 12 May 1944 Discarded 1946
1594 LST 1018 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 14 May 1944 Scrapped 1948
1595 LST 1019 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 17 May 1944 Discarded 1948
1596 LST 1020 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 19 May 1944 Scrapped 1948
1597 LST 1021 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 24 May 1944 Discarded 1947
1598 LST 1022 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 24 May 1944 Scrapped 1948
1599 LST 1023 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 26 May 1944 Discarded 1948
1600 LST 1024 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 28 May 1944 Discarded 1948
1601 LST 1025 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 31 May 1944 Discarded 1948
1602 LST 1026 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 7 June 1944 Discarded 1947
1603 LST 1027 LST 511 Class Tank Landing Ship US Navy New 7 June 1944 Discarded 1947
1604 CA 143 Salem Class Heavy Cruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 13 Aug 1945
1605 CV 50 Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New -- Cancelled 27 Mar 1945
1606 Basilone
(DDE 824)
Gearing Class Destroyer (Incomplete) US Navy Completion as Epperson Class Escort Destroyer 21 July 1949 Discarded 1977
1607 Pennsylvania 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Texas Co. (Texaco) New 5 Aug 1949 Scrapped 1985
1608 Texas 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Texas Co. (Texaco) New 31 Aug 1949 Scrapped 1986
1609 Ohio 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Texas Co. (Texaco) New 21 Oct 1949 Scrapped 1985
1610 Kentucky 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Texas Co. (Texaco) New 26 Oct 1949 Scrapped 1985
1611 World Liberty 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker World Tankers Co. (Niarchos) New 30 Nov 1949 Collision 12 March 1966 Scrapped
1612 Northampton
(CLC 1)
Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser (Incomplete) US Navy Completion as Northampton Class Tactical Command Ship 28 Feb 1953 Discarded 1977
1613 Capsa 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Atlas Tankers, Inc. New 11 Jan 1950 Scrapped 1976
1614 Capulus 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Atlas Tankers, Inc. New 15 Mar 1950 Scrapped 1975
1615 Caperata 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Atlas Tankers, Inc. New 12 Apr 1950 Scrapped 1976
1616 Caprella 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Atlas Tankers, Inc. New 14 June 1950 Scrapped 1977
1617 Caprinus 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Atlas Tankers, Inc. New 14 Sept 1950 Scrapped 1978
1618 Independence 682' Passenger Liner American Export Lines New 11 Jan 1951 In Service
1619 Constitution 682' Passenger Liner American Export Lines New 7 June 1951 Lost 24 Nov 1997
1620 Willis A. Lee
(DL 4)
Mitscher Class Frigate US Navy New 29 Sept 1954 Scrapped 1973
1621 Wilkinson
(DL 5)
Mitscher Class Frigate US Navy New 29 July 1954 Scrapped 1975
1622 Old Colony Mariner Mariner Class 563' C4-S-1a Freighter US Maritime Administration New 28 Oct 1952 Scrapped 1980
1623 Cornhusker Mariner Mariner Class 563' C4-S-1a Freighter US Maritime Administration New 5 Jan 1953 Wrecked 7 July 1953 Scrapped
1624 Pine Tree Mariner Mariner Class 563' C4-S-1a Freighter US Maritime Administration New 3 Apr 1953 Unknown ( Mariposa )
1625 Nutmeg Mariner Mariner Class 563' C4-S-1a Freighter US Maritime Administration New 9 Sept 1953 Wrecked 8 oct 1961
1626 Wolverine Mariner Mariner Class 563' C4-S-1a Freighter US Maritime Administration New 30 Oct 1953 Unknown ( Arizona )
1627 Failaika 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Afran Transport Co. (Gulf) New 3 July 1952 Scrapped 1980
1628 La Cruz 28,000 DWT, 624' Tanker Afran Transport Co. (Gulf) New 18 Sept 1952 Scrapped 1980
1629 Waneta 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Brilliant Transport Co. (Socony- Vacuum Oil Co.) New 11 Dec 1952 Scrapped 1977
1630 Chryssi 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Santander Compania Naviera, S.A. (Orion) New 26 Feb 1953 Sunk 26 Dec 1970
1631 Andros Island 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Rio Venturado Compania Naviera, S.A. (Orion) New 7 May 1953 Scrapped 1975
1632 Andros Hills 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Rio Venturado Compania Naviera, S.A. (Orion) New 12 Aug 1953 Scrapped 1972
1633 Neosho
(AO 143)
Neosho Class Fleet Oiler US Navy New 17 Sept 1954 Stricken 1994
1634 Orion Comet 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Oil Carriers Joint Venture (Orion) New 16 Oct 1953 Lost 12/1976
1635 Master Peter 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Bilbao Compania Naviera, S.A. (Orion) New 8 Oct 1954 Scrapped 1977
1636 George Livanos 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Atlantic Oil Carriers Ltd. (Livanos) New 11 Jan 1954 Scrapped 1976
1637 Athina Livanos 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Atlantic Oil Carriers Ltd. (Livanos) New 9 Sept 1954 Scrapped 1977
1638 Marine Dow-Chem 16,600 DWT, 551' Chemical Tanker Marine Chemicals Transport Co. New 26 Mar 1954 Barged 1974
1639 World Glory 45,500 DWT, 736' Tanker World Tankers Co. (Niarchos) New 19 Aug 1954 Sunk 14 June 1968
1640 Unknown
1641 Unknown
1642 Contract Transferred to Bethlehem Sparrows Point
1643 Margarita 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Afran Transport Co. (Gulf) New 15 July 1954 Scrapped 1979
1644 -- 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Reconquista Compania Panamena de Naviera (Konialidis) New -- Cancelled
1645 Unknown
1646 Unknown
1647 Socony-Vacuum 27,000 DWT, 604' Tanker Socony- Vacuum Oil Co. New 3 Dec 1954 Scrapped 1985
1648 Decatur
(DD 936)
Forrest Sherman Class Destroyer US Navy New 30 Nov 1956 In Service (ex- Decatur )
1649 Davis
(DD 937)
Forrest Sherman Class Destroyer US Navy New 28 Feb 1957 Scrapped 1996
1650 Jonas Ingram
(DD 938)
Forrest Sherman Class Destroyer US Navy New 10 July 1957 Target 20 July 1988
1651 Blandy
(DD 943)
Forrest Sherman Class Destroyer US Navy New 20 Nov 1957 Scrapped 1996
1652 Mullinix
(DD 944)
Forrest Sherman Class Destroyer US Navy New 26 Feb 1958 Target 22 Aug 1992
1653 -- Offshore Radar Platform - Georges Bank Station US Navy / US Air Force New 13 June 1955 Demolished 1963-1964
1654 Mobilgas 27,000 DWT, 604' Tanker Charles Kurz & Co. New 17 May 1956 Scrapped 1984
1655 World Beauty 45,500 DWT, 736' Tanker World Beauty Corp. (Niarchos) New 18 Apr 1957 Scrapped 1977
1656 Farragut
(DLG 6)
Farragut Class Frigate US Navy New 8 Dec 1960 Stricken 1992
1657 Luce
(DLG 7)
Farragut Class Frigate US Navy New 11 May 1961 Stricken 1992
1658 Macdonough
(DLG 8)
Farragut Class Frigate US Navy New 29 Oct 1961 Stricken 1992
1659 Mobil Fuel 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Kurz Tankers New Unknown Laid Up ( Meacham )
1660 Mobil Power 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Kurz Tankers New 27 Sept 1957 Laid Up ( Naeco )
1661 Olympic Eagle 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Greenwich Panama, S.A. (Onassis) New 27 Aug 1958 Scrapped 1979
1662 Olympic Falcon 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Occidental Shipping Co., S.A. (Onassis) New 8 Dec 1958 Scrapped 1979
1663 Mobil Lube 29,000 DWT, 644' Tanker Socony Mobil Oil Co. New 10 Jan 1958 Scrapped 1983
1664 -- 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Bahama Marine S.A. (Onassis) New -- Cancelled 25 Nov 1957
1665 Princes Sophie 71,000 DWT, 859' Tanker World Brilliance Corp. (Niarchos) New 18 Mar 1959 Scrapped 1977
1666 Subcontracted to Bethlehem Sparrows Point
1667 Subcontracted to Bethlehem Sparrows Point
1668 Transeastern 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Transeastern Shipping Corp. New 30 July 1959 Scrapped 1995
1669 Long Beach
(CGN 9)
Long Beach Class Guided Missile Cruiser US Navy New 1 Sept 1961 Stricken 1995 Pending Scrapping
1670 -- 106,000 DWT, 940' Tanker Goldensea Panama, S.A. (Onassis) New -- Cancelled 25 Nov 1957
1671 Mount Vernon Victory 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Mount Vernon Tanker Co. (Onassis) New 27 Jan 1961 Laid Up ( Mount Vernon )
1672 Monticello Victory 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Monticello Tanker Co. (Onassis) New Unk. Burned 31 May 1981 Scrapped 1984
1673 Patro 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Hercules Tankers Corp./Tanker Owners, S.A. New 20 Feb 1959 Scrapped 1979
1674 Capulonix 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Hercules Tankers Corp./Asiatic Petroleum Corp. New 25 Sept 1959 Scrapped 1979
1675 Capiluna 46,000 DWT, 736' Tanker Hercules Tankers Corp./Asiatic Petroleum Corp. New 21 Oct 1960 Scrapped 1980
1676 Leland I. Doan 16,500 DWT, 551' Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Marine Interests Corp. New 3 Feb 1961 Scrapped 1985
1677 Bainbridge
(DLGN 25)
Bainbridge Class Frigate US Navy New 28 Aug 1962 Stricken 1995 Pending Scrapping
1678 Subcontracted to Bethlehem Sparrows Point
1679 Manhattan 106,500 DWT, 940' Tanker Manhattan Tankers Co. (Niarchos) New 15 Jan 1962 Scrapped 1987
1680 Orion Hunter 67,000 DWT, 860' Tanker Colonial Tankers Corp. (Orion) New 20 Dec 1961 Scrapped 1989
1681 -- 106,500 DWT, 940' Tanker 1681 Corp./ Victory Carriers (Onassis) New -- Cancelled 9 June 1961
1682 Subcontracted to Bethlehem Sparrows Point
1683 Subcontracted to Bethlehem Sparrows Point
1684 American Courier 560' C4-S-57a Freighter United States Lines New 8 Feb 1963 Scrapped 1986
1685 American Commander 560' C4-S-57a Freighter United States Lines New 17 Apr 1963 Laid Up ( Pioneer Commander )
1686 American Corsair 560' C4-S-57a Freighter United States Lines New 7 June 1963 Scrapped 1686
1687 American Contractor 560' C4-S-57a Freighter United States Lines New Unk. Laid Up ( Pioneer Contractor )
1688 American Contender 560' C4-S-57a Freighter United States Lines New Unk. Unknown
1689 American Crusader 560' C4-S-57a Freighter United States Lines New Unk. Laid Up ( Pioneer Crusader )
1690 Montpelier Victory 47,000 DWT, 736' Tanker 1681 Corp./ Victory Carriers (Onassis) New 25 Oct 1962 Scrapped 1985
1691 Mount Washington 47,000 DWT, 736' Tanker 1681 Corp./ Victory Carriers (Onassis) New 31 Oct 1963 In Reserve
1692 Whale
(SSN 638)
Sturgeon Class Attack Submarine Built by General Dynamics / Quincy Shipbuilding Division
1693 Sunfish
(SSN 649)
Sturgeon Class Attack Submarine Built by General Dynamics / Quincy Shipbuilding Division

Major Sources:
List of Ships Built at the Quincy Yard . Central Technical Department of Bethlehem Steel Company, Shipbuilding Division, Quincy, MA., with unofficial addenda.

Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships . Naval Historical Center, Washington, D.C., 1959-1991.

Special thanks to Michael Pryce for providing many ship fates, and to everyone who has provided updated information about these ships.


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