Information

Front view of StuG III Ausf D


Front view of StuG III Ausf D

This plan shows a front view of the StuG III Ausf D.

The plan comes from Sturmgeschütz III . Rückgrat der Infanterie, Peter Müller and Wolfgang Zimmermann, with thanks to the authors.


Description

The Sturmgeschütz III Ausf. F (StuG III F) is a rank II German tank destroyer with a battle rating of 3.3 (AB/RB/SB). It was introduced during the Closed Beta Test for Ground Forces before Update 1.41. An improvement over the StuG III A with the installation of the longer 75 mm StuK 40 L/43 gun.

This tank destroyer has a very high first-shot knock-out ability, due to the superb penetration, damage and accuracy of its gun. Right off the bat, the gun will easily penetrate medium tanks and the KV-1 at certain ranges, and the APCR ammo can consistently pen KV-1's at most ranges. Furthermore, its gun is very accurate and with proper range-finding and aim, hitting the bow gunner's port on a T-34 is possible from 800 meters. However, its frontal armour is insufficient for any form of "slugging match" and its reload time is extensive, so it should be used at long-medium ranges and moved into cover once a shot is fired.


Stug III in Afrika??

I don't haven seen the any picture for Sug III in Afrika so far.

I heard about the 'Stug III/D's were used in the front by the "Sonderverband 288'in "90th Leichte Afrika Division". Please let me know some more information about this.

Afrika Stugs

May 04, 2002 #2 2002-05-04T13:10

Thanks a lot. (n/t)

May 04, 2002 #3 2002-05-04T13:39

DAK Stug III

May 04, 2002 #4 2002-05-04T14:06

Does the DAK use the Stug III?

I don't haven seen the any picture for Sug III in Afrika so far.

I heard about the 'Stug III/D's were used in the front by the "Sonderverband 288'in "90th Leichte Afrika Division". Please let me know some more information about this.

DAK StuGs

May 04, 2002 #5 2002-05-04T18:41

Does the DAK use the Stug III?

I don't haven seen the any picture for Sug III in Afrika so far.

I heard about the 'Stug III/D's were used in the front by the "Sonderverband 288'in "90th Leichte Afrika Division". Please let me know some more information about this.

There were two units that went to Africa with StuG IIIs.

The first was Sonderverband 288 which was a combined arms unit of several battalions that was originally intended for deployment in the Middle East. It was established on 24 July 1941 in Potsdam.
In its 5th Company, an anti-tank company was a platoon of StuG IIIs organized under KStN. 215. The vehicles in this platoon were:
1 motorcycle with side car
1 armored ammo carrier either a SdKfz 252 or SdKfz 250/6
1 armored ammo trailer
3 StuG IIIs
The StuG IIIs were Ausf Ds that were modified as follows:
Extra torsion bars- Two spare torsion bars were mounted, one on each side, on the lower hull sides over the dampers.
To facilitate air flow to the engine, armored covers were placed over over holes cut into three of the engine access doors and the radiator access doors. These armored covers later became standard production items on the later StuG IIIs and PzKpw IIIs.
The lights and siren had brush guards formed around them.
The unit carried 5 spare road wheels
Accross the rear of the hull they had a rack that carried 11 spare jerry cans
There were also a large cyclindrical air cleaner mounted above each grille with a pipe that led into the engine compartment.

Concord's Armor At War Series in Armor of the Deutsches Afrikakorps No 7021 has pictures and drawings of this units StuG IIIs in Africa.

These StuGs saw action from Bir Hacheim in May 1942 till El Alamein in October 1942.

The second unit to Africa with StuG IIIs was StuG Batterie 90 which was attached to Artillerie Regiment 90 of the 90. leichte "Afrika" Division.
This unit actually started life as StuG Abteilung 242 being formed on 13 November 1942 at Jüterbog. It was formed as a battalion for deployment to Africa. However only the 1st Battery went to Africa for the 2nd and 3rd Batteries were deverted to Hungary in October 1942 and from there to battle in Russia, but that is another story.

The 1st Battery , with 6 long barrelled StuG IIIs, was transported to North Africa via Brenner Pass-Naples-Sicily. During the sea transport portion of the trip two of the StuG IIIs were lost as was a SdKfz 9 and the trailer when the ship carring them was sunk. The battery arrived in North Africa with only 4 StuG IIIs. It arrived in late February 1943 and by this time the Germans were fighting only in Tunisia. The battery was captured on 11 May 1943 by the British at Kap Bon Peninsula.

The StuG IIIs used were either Ausf F-8s or very early Ausf Gs.

A total of 9 StuG IIIs was assigned to Africa and 7 reached Africa to fight and none came home.


Missing-Lynx

My main gripe with Dragon Stugs is that they only include early style muzzle brake and early style tracks.

Aug 05, 2019 #23 2019-08-05T11:08

Dragon 6581 Dec production StuG

That's an informative review, I'm nearly finished the kit, if I was just opening it up, that would have been great for building a 'factory perfect' model - if there is such a thing in StuG's. I guess main thing is my deviations are not too great, and frankly a factory perfect model would bore the pants off me!

So I'm sticking to the paradyme that no two StuG's are identical unless built same day same factory, and it's an interesting talking point over the model that I used (deliberately), the tired return rollers. I also didn't apply a zimmerit coating, but I found a couple of StuG's with no zimmerit, old return rollers and Topfblende in photos.

But next time I'd like to build another StuG, preferably a later one again, I found a lot of reviews online about the other StuG kits but not this one.

To anyone else building it, it's a nice kit, I never in 41years of kit building had so much fun as from this one, even though Dragon can seem to leave important info out and make mistakes in their instructions.

Aug 05, 2019 #24 2019-08-05T16:36

The early, mid, late designations are just for modellers.

Aug 05, 2019 #25 2019-08-05T18:32

I still use the old ( but gold ! ) Spielberger StuG book along with the History Facts ( Vol 2 )
if you only get 1 StuG book Dave the History Facts book is the "Bible" !

Aug 06, 2019 #26 2019-08-06T15:59

I think it may be time for 'it's important not to get bogged down by all the early/mid/late stuff' and remember that the base Dragon/CH StuG.III auf.G kits are a bit like lego - they will assemble into any of the versions with a few of the right additions. The first and most important add-on (to me) is usually a good set of AM tracks that ties in with one's photo-reference, as this sets up the build accurately from the outset. For this Fuhrer-Grenadier-Brigade Nov 44 MIAG build I used the CH 'Georg Bose early' as a basis (but with a semi-interlocked front and rear hull from card), and your Arab Stugs have a lot more parts than this one did as a basis for a 'late'. Tracks are Modelkasten which are still one of the very best IMHO.

22XJd7ZcEhMYDuLaA15c0kV3y4Gzua4UaFsqG73ckdwftsudhQcoa2rlWK4LZYzn20QBt-s7AJlMk-Vx3LhKTUn1AFhhZm9XElUN3SNZPbW8HJJpEZXYs3BvHM7w__&Key-Pair-Id=APKAJS72YROXJYGYDADA" />

Aug 06, 2019 #27 2019-08-06T17:35

ronrunningman wrote: Hi Dave

I think it may be time for 'it's important not to get bogged down by all the early/mid/late stuff' and remember that the base Dragon/CH StuG.III auf.G kits are a bit like lego - they will assemble into any of the versions with a few of the right additions. The first and most important add-on (to me) is usually a good set of AM tracks that ties in with one's photo-reference, as this sets up the build accurately from the outset. For this Fuhrer-Grenadier-Brigade Dec 44 MIAG build I used the CH 'Georg Bose early' as a basis (but with a semi-interlocked front and rear hull from card), and your Arab Stugs have a lot more parts than this one did as a basis for a 'late'. Tracks are Modelkasten which are still one of the very best IMHO.

Aug 07, 2019 #28 2019-08-07T04:06

Aug 07, 2019 #29 2019-08-07T05:23

ronrunningman wrote: Hi Dave

I think it may be time for 'it's important not to get bogged down by all the early/mid/late stuff' and remember that the base Dragon/CH StuG.III auf.G kits are a bit like lego - they will assemble into any of the versions with a few of the right additions. The first and most important add-on (to me) is usually a good set of AM tracks that ties in with one's photo-reference, as this sets up the build accurately from the outset. For this Fuhrer-Grenadier-Brigade Dec 44 MIAG build I used the CH 'Georg Bose early' as a basis (but with a semi-interlocked front and rear hull from card), and your Arab Stugs have a lot more parts than this one did as a basis for a 'late'. Tracks are Modelkasten which are still one of the very best IMHO.

Yes (a typo, this should be a Nov 44, I have altered it) you're right, I have MIAG changing over sometime in Nov 44 (but not all at once), my build has both the 3-pilzen plus the heavy drawbar. so it would be an early Nov build.

(Some of these StuGs were knocked on around Boursheid/Heiderscheid/Noville between 24 - 26 Dec 44, hence my typing error! . The remounted spare wheel brackets and spare track protection of F-G-B StuGs are seen on page 14-15 and 78-79 of Panzerwrecks 16 Bulge).

Aug 07, 2019 #30 2019-08-07T15:13

Ron that is a great looking Stug, I really like your style. I have never really been able to find Modelkasten track. I bought a few sets at Hannants in the UK ages ago. I mainly use Fruils. Are you using different types. On your first pic I thought they were lightweight final track. Not to sure of the official description but it has a V cut out in the horn. I noticed that yours have cleats. Is that large box at the back scratch built? I have something similar from Atak. How is that spare wheel on the rear fender secured? I hope it’s OK to bombard you with questions,

I have a bit of reference including the Achtung Panzer book, it is a truism that you can never have too much reference or rephrased you will never have enough. I will have to go hunting for Stirling’s references. Are the Muller books good?

Marc’s timeline is good. I have a similar WIP list. I think I got the original from this site. I need to update it with the new material. I understand that production changes and details are more nuanced that the broad brushstrokes of early/mid/late. They can never be hard and fast as the overlap of features is continuous. I think that is what makes building kits like this fascinating. It would be nice if some of the new manufactures got involved. I can’t seem to find the Dragon kits anymore and Tamiya and Bronco kits are a bit limited. As a side project I am committing a Tamiya “early” Stug to major surgery. Not too sure whether the patient will survive.)
.


A new start

While the idea for a new StuG vehicle based on the Panzer IV chassis was discarded, several months later, due to desperate necessity, it would come to life again. In November 1943, the Allies heavily bombed the Alkett factory which was instrumental for the overall StuG III production. As the production of vital StuG III vehicles was temporarily stopped, the Germans needed a new quick solution. At a military conference held in early December 1943, Adolf Hitler was informed that the StuG III Ausf. G superstructure could be, with minimal effort, mated with a Panzer IV Ausf. H or J chassis. This time, however, the new vehicle had to have minimal changes to the components used for its construction. The only major modification was the extension of the driver compartment. Hitler was impressed with this proposal, as it would be easy to implement due to available parts and production capabilities. Hitler also suggested giving this new vehicle to the Panzer Abteilungen, as it would facilitate maintenance and procurement of spare parts.

The negative side of this decision was the reduction of available chassis for the Panzer IV tank. But, as the production of the Panzer IV was to be terminated in favor of larger Panther tanks, this was not seen as a huge issue. The actual production of the Panzer IV, due to the high demands for tank vehicles, was never canceled and it lasted almost up to the end of war. As the need for the StuG III vehicles was great, Hitler gave a green light for the realisation of the project.


Operational history

Overall, Sturmgeschütz series assault guns proved very successful and served on all fronts as assault guns and tank destroyers. Although Tigers and Panthers have earned a greater notoriety, assault guns collectively destroyed more tanks. Because of their low silhouette, StuG IIIs were easy to camouflage and a difficult target. Sturmgeschütz crews were considered to be the elite of the artillery units. Sturmgeschütz units claimed to have knocked out 20,000 tanks by 1944. [ 7 ] As of April 10, 1945, there were 1,053 StuG IIIs and 277 StuH 42s in service.

The StuG assault guns were cost-effective compared to the heavier German tanks, though in the anti-tank role they were best used defensively, as the lack of a traversable turret was a severe disadvantage in the assault role. As the German military situation deteriorated later in the war, more StuG guns were built compared to tanks, to replace losses and bolster defenses against the encroaching Allied forces.

In 1943 and 1944, the Finnish Army received a total of 59 StuG III Ausf. Gs from Germany and used them against the Soviet Union. Thirty of the vehicles were received in 1943 and 29 in 1944. The 1943 batch destroyed at least 87 enemy tanks for a loss of only 8 StuGs [ 7 ] (some of which were destroyed by their crews to avoid capture). The 1944 batch saw no real action. After the war, the StuGs were the main combat vehicles of the Finnish Army until the early 1960s. These StuGs gained the nickname "Sturmi" which can be found in some plastic kit models.

100 StuG III Ausf. G were delivered to Romania in the autumn of 1943. They were officially known as TAs (or TAs T3 to avoid confusion with TAs T4) in the army inventory. By February 1945, 13 units were still in use with the 2nd Armoured Regiment. None of this initial batch survived the end of the war. [ 8 ] 31 TAs were on the army inventory in November 1947. Most of them were probably StuG III Ausf. G and a small number of Panzer IV/70 (V), known as TAs T4. These TAs were supplied by the Red Army or were damaged units repaired by the Romanian Army. [ 9 ] All German equipment was scrapped in 1954 due to the Army's decision to use Soviet armour.

StuG IIIs were also exported to other nations such as Bulgaria, Hungary, Italy, and Spain.

Many German Sturmgeschütz IIIs were stranded in Yugoslavia after the war. These were used by the Yugoslav Peoples Army until the 1950s.

After the Second World War the Soviet Union donated some of their captured German vehicles to Syria, which continued to use them along with other war surplus AFVs (like long-barreled Panzer IVs and T-34/85s) during the 1950s and up until the War over Water against Israel in the mid-1960s. By the time of the Six Days War all of them had been either destroyed, stripped for spare parts, or interred on the Golan Heights as static pillboxes.


Front view of StuG III Ausf D - History

/Vehicles/Axis/Germany/05-Sturmpanzers/StuG3/File/ 7-StuG3G.htm | Last Up-date: 16-10-2020

Sturmgeschütz III Assault Gun

Le Sturmgeschütz III Ausf.Gest la dernière version de la série du StuG III et la plus connue et surtout produite. Cette version fait son apparition au début de l'année 1943. Ce nouveau design est en fait une amélioration du modèle précédent le StuG III Ausf.F8. Le châssis ne connu guère de changement sinon qu'au début le nez avait un blindage de 50mm qui fut augmenté à 80mm par l'ajout de plaques de 30mm (boulonnées ou soudées). Au fil de la production un nez épais de 80mm sera introduit pour faciliter la production. Au niveau de la superstructure le blindage de la partie frontale est standardisé à 80mm au moyen de plaques supplémentaires de 30mm boulonnées sur le blindage normal épais de 50mm. Par après la partie avant de la superstructure sera constituée d'une seule plaque de 80mm. Notons que le viseur du pilote est toujours celui conçu pour le blindage de 50mm et que sur les tout premiers il est encore surmonté par les deux trous de la lunette binoculaire (fahrerfernohr).

Sturmgeschütz III Ausf.G is the last version of the series of StuG III and the most known and especially produced. This version makes its appearance at the beginning of the year 1943. This new design is in fact an improvement of the preceding model StuG III Ausf.F8. The chassis known hardly change if not that at the beginning the nose had a shielding of 50mm which was increased to 80mm by the addition of plates of 30mm (bolted or welded). With the wire of the production a thick nose of 80mm will be introduced to facilitate the production. On the level of the superstructure the shielding of the frontal part is standardized to 80mm by means of additional plates of 30mm bolted on the thick normal shielding of 50mm. By after the front part of superstructure will consist of only one plate of 80mm. Let us note that the sight of the pilot is always that conceived for the shielding of 50mm and that on the whole first it is still surmounted by the two holes of the binocular glasses (fahrerfernohr).

Mais le fait le plus notable est que la superstructure fut élargie sur les surplombs des chenilles afin de fournir un espace interne plus conséquent. Ce gain d'espace fut utilisé pour installer le matériel radio à l'intérieur du véhicule (donc disparition des coffres-radio à l'extérieur) et charger des munitions supplémentaires. Le toit fut encore élevé sur sa partie arrière pour accueillir une coupole de commandant de forme cylindrique à 8 épiscopes. La trappe de la coupole était équipée d'un petit clapet qui permettait d'utiliser une lunette binoculaire lorsque que celle-ciétait close. Notons que les épiscopes était protégés par des plaques en plastique transparent.

But the most notable fact is that the superstructure was widened on the overhangs of the tracks in order to provide a interior space more consequent. This profit of space was used to install the radio operator material inside the vehicle (thus disappearance of outside radio-basket) and to load additional ammunition. The roof was still high on its back part to accomodate a commander cupola of cylindrical of form with 8 episcopes. The trap door of the cupola was equipped with a small valve which made it possible to use binocular glasses when that this one was closed. Let us note what the episcopes was protected by transparent plastic plates.


German Tank Support For Infantry

Post by Pips » 16 Oct 2015, 05:52

Reading Stephen Zaloga'a excellent book "Armored Champion: The Top Tanks Of WWII".

Came across an interesting comment in the book, to wit:
A widely overlooked consequence of the small scale of German tank production
was the inability of the Wehrmacht to provide adequate tank support to the infantry
divisions. Unlike the Red Army, the Wehrmacht did not deploy separate tank regi-
ments for infantry support missions, concentrating its tanks entirely in the panzer
divisions. The lack of direct tank support degraded the offensive capability of the
German infantry divisions, especially when attempting to conduct breakthrough
operations against the Red Army.

I was always under the impression that the STUG had the role of infantry support, especially in the early years of the war.

Re: German Tank Support For Infantry

Post by Gary Kennedy » 16 Oct 2015, 14:22

It might simply be he's drawing a distinction between the use of non-Divisional armoured units by both Western armies and the Red Army, which were equipped with tanks and handled as such, while the German Army left the armoured support role for its Inf Divs in the hands of the Artillery arm, via the Stugs. While the Stug grew to be all things to all arms (assault gun, panzer replacement and tank killer) I suspect each body operated it differently. Would a German assault artillery unit provide close support down to Rifle Coy level as was found in Br/US practice, or would they offer covering fire from a distance for example?

Re: German Tank Support For Infantry

Post by stg 44 » 16 Oct 2015, 16:02

Pips wrote: Reading Stephen Zaloga'a excellent book "Armored Champion: The Top Tanks Of WWII".

Came across an interesting comment in the book, to wit:
A widely overlooked consequence of the small scale of German tank production
was the inability of the Wehrmacht to provide adequate tank support to the infantry
divisions. Unlike the Red Army, the Wehrmacht did not deploy separate tank regi-
ments for infantry support missions, concentrating its tanks entirely in the panzer
divisions. The lack of direct tank support degraded the offensive capability of the
German infantry divisions, especially when attempting to conduct breakthrough
operations against the Red Army.

I was always under the impression that the STUG had the role of infantry support, especially in the early years of the war.

Re: German Tank Support For Infantry

Post by pintere » 16 Oct 2015, 16:22

As you note, there is no mention of the Stug arm and how it substituted for nominal tank tank support. Though in early years it was fairly scarce, as the war went on Stug support became an increasingly important part of German military doctrine. For instance, feel free to check out the German battle of Kursk OOB. In the north the fighting was done mostly by infantry divisions. Every corps involved in the northern assault has 1-2 Stug battalions for infantry support. The Germans could not hope to build Stug battalions for all their infantry divisions, but contrary to Zaloga, they did have a substitute for direct tank support in breakthrough (and other) operations.

As an afterthought, recently I've been reading a lot of books by Robert Forczyk. I'd highly recommend his work on the eastern front. He is neither overly biased towards the Red Army or the Wehrmacht (or in Zaloga's case, against the Wehrmacht), and gives credit and criticism to both sides where it is due, a fairly uncommon trait among most Eastern front historians.


StuG III- The Most Produced Armored Assault Vehicle Of Nazi Germany

The Sturmgeschütz III was most definitely one of the most iconic tank destroyers of WWII. Contributing to the cult status of StuG was the fact that it was the most produced armored fighting vehicle of Nazi Germany.

Based on a chassis of the mass produced Panzer III, the Sturmgeschütz III (hence the mark) overwhelmed the European fronts, numbering more than 10,000 units. The design did not include a turret, which made its production much easier.

StuG in the Soviet Union, 1941 Photo Credit

Its name meant “assault gun.” It had gone through several modifications by the end of the war, as it was constantly upgraded and improved.

Following the invasion by Germany of the USSR in 1941, Hitler realized he could not rely on the inadequacy of the Red Army for long. The Soviet KV tanks and the T-34 had proven to be tough opponents. Their armor withstood hits from most of the early German Panzers.

Initially, the StuG III was intended as an infantry support armored light gun vehicle. The idea was conceived after WWI. It was deemed necessary to have a mobile artillery piece following an infantry charge in order to react quickly in removing obstacles such as pillboxes and bunkers.

StuG in Latvia during the Baltic Operation Photo Credit

The father of the Assault Artillery concept, or the Sturmartillerie, was the celebrated general of the Wehrmacht, Erich von Manstein. The tactics used in the Great War were considered obsolete by the time of WWII. StuG III, therefore, assumed another role as an effective tank destroyer. It could tackle even the toughest Soviet armor in the period between 1941 and 1943.

The 75 mm StuK 37L/24 gun mounted on the first versions was a powerful weapon indeed. The lack of a turret made the silhouette low, making it a perfect weapon for ambushes and defense efforts. Its armor was between 16–80 mm (.62 – 3.15 in) thick, providing decent protection for the crew of four.

Battle of Stalingrad: Infantry and a supporting StuG assault gun advance towards the city center Photo Credit

Although the turretless design had its advantages, a major setback was its lack of mobility. The initial versions did not have a built-in machine gun. The StuG proved to be vulnerable in close combat against infantry, as its crew had problems with visibility. Nevertheless, it participated in numerous conflicts on the Eastern Front as the backbone of German tank destroyer units.

In 1943, the chassis of Panzer IV was adapted to house the slightly longer 7.5 cm StuK 40 L/48 gun. By then the RAF was extensively bombing the Reich’s production facilities. Only the StuG IV was produced and in much smaller numbers.

British troops inspect captured German equipment, including a StuG IV and a StuG III Photo Credit

As the war was coming to an end, the StuG III and IV began to replace their Panzer counterparts. Their production was cheaper and faster than that of regular tanks.

Finnish StuG III Ausf. G Photo Credit

StuG served in a number of Axis armies, including Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, Italy and Finland. After the war, in the 1950s, the Soviet Union donated some of the captured StuG vehicles to the newly formed Syrian Army. They later saw action in conflicts such as the “War over Water” with Israel in 1964.


History

The StuiG was developed in 1941 by the Alkett company upon the Wehrmacht ordering new heavy assault guns. The StuiG was built on a dozen converted chassis of StuG III Ausf. Es, all of which were completed in December 1941 and January 1942, but none were issued to their units. On September 20, 1942 another dozen heavy assault guns were ordered, and all existing StuiG 33s were rebuilt. [citation needed] However, other sources claim that the StuiG was built on the repaired chassis of various StuG III assault guns, all twenty-four vehicles being produced by Alkett, starting in the September of 1942. [citation needed]

The first twelve StuiGs were delivered in the October of 1942 and issued to the Sturmgeschütz-Abteilungens 177 and 244, which were currently engaged in fighting at Stalingrad. The remaining twelve vehicles could not be delivered to the Sturmgeschütz-Abteilungens 243 and 245, which too were engaged at Stalingrad but had now been surround, along with the German Sixth Army, by Soviet forces. They were then subsequently formed into the Sturm-Infanteriegeschütz Batterie/Lehr Bataillon XVII, and attached to the 22nd Panzer Division during the ill-fated German attempt to relieve the encircled Sixth Army. Following the division's destruction during the fighting here, the battery was then permantly assigned to the 23rd Panzer Division, where it became the Sturm-Infanteriegeschütz Batterie/Panzer Regiment 201, also known as 9 Kompanie/Panzer Regiment 201, and remained with this unit for the rest of World War II. By the September of 1944, strength reports indicated that only five remained in service at the time. Only one remains today, and is located at the Kubinka NIIBT Research Collection near Moscow, Russia.


Watch the video: WW2 StuG III Ausf A - B - C - D - E - Sturmgeschütz III - footage part 1. (January 2022).