Information

Leary I DD- 158 - History


Leary I
(DD-158: dp. 1,090; 1. 314'; b. 30'6"; dr. 12'; s. 35 k.
cpl. 176; a. ff 3", 6 21" tt., 2 dct., 1 Y-gun; cl. Wickes)

The first Leary (DD-158) was laid down 6 March 1918 by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N.J.; launched 18 December 1918, sponsored by Mrs. Anne Leary, mother of Lt. C. F. Leary; and commissioned 5 December 1919, Comdr. Martin in command.

Leary departed Boston 28 January 1920 for Guantanamo on shakedown and training, then continued her training in northern waters before transiting the Panama Canal 2? January 1921 to join the Battle Fleet in the Pacific. Upon completion of large-scale maneuvers off the coast of Peru in February, she returned to the Caribbean where in June she observed the effects of seaplane bombardment upon ex-German ships. In the wake of the Washington Naval Disarmament Conference, Leary was placed out of commission in reserve at Philadelphia Navy Yard 29 June 1922.

Reactivating 8 years later, on 1 May 1930 she Joined the Atlantic Fleet with Newport, R.I., as her home port. In addition to annual exercises in the Caribbean, every other year she operated off the West Coast in joint maneuvers with the Pacific Fleet. After 1935 training cruises for reserves and midshipmen occupied most of her time.

The rising war clouds over Europe changed thou schedule. In September 1939 destroyers Leary and Hamilton (D-141) established a continuous antisubmarine patrol on the lower New England coast. The following year her patrol functions enlarged and 9 September 1941 she began a seriea of hazardous escort missions to Iceland. On 19 November Leary became the First American ship to make radar contact with a U-boat. After 26 February 1942 she spent a year escorting convoys from the mid ocean meeting point to various Icelandic ports.

Leary departed this duty 7 February 1943 for Boston and a new area of service. Emerging from drydock the old four-stacker departed Boston 1 March for Guantanamo Naval Base where she engaged in antisubmarine exercises with R~ before resuming escort duty, guarding four convoys to Trinidad, British West Indies, between mid march and mid-June 1943. She returned to New York 25 June.

Leary now began transatlantic escort voyages to guard ever-increasing amounts of supplies from the United States to the Mediterranean. She picked up a convoy o~ New York harbor 7 July, sailed first to Aruba, Dutch West Indies, and then across to Algiers, arriving the 31st. A return convoy using the same route entered New York 27 August. A second voyage concluded 30 October but Leary would not return from her third transatlantic assignment of 1943.

Bate in November she departed the East Coast with escort carrier Card (CVE -11) on a hunter-killer operation. Early in the mid-watch 24 December, Leary suddenly found herself in the midst of a German submarine pack. Leary took two torpedoes within minutes of her discovery of the enemy and a third torpedo finally sank this valiant ship. Ninety-seven members of the ship's company were lost, including her commanding officer, Comdr. James E. Keyes.

Leary received one battle star for World War II service.


USS Leary (i) (DD 158)


USS Leary shortly before she was sunk

Decommissoned 29 June 1922
Recommissioned 1 May 1930

On 24 December 1943, the American hunter-killer Task Group 21.14, formed around the USS Card was spotted by a German reconnaissance aircraft and the wolfpack Borkum was ordered to attack. The carrier had a narrow escape when three FAT torpedoes fired at 01.43 hours by U-415 (Neide) missed her. The same U-boat also missed the USS Decatur (DD 341) with a Gnat. At 05.05 hours, U-275 fired a Gnat at the USS Leary (DD 158) (Cdr. James Ellsworth Kyes, USN) and hit her on the starboard side in the after engine room. A second Gnat fired by U-382 (Zorn) at 05.21 hours missed the already sinking destroyer. She sank after a huge internal explosion within one minute about 585 miles west-north-west of Cape Finisterre in position 45º15'N, 21º40'W. 97 of the crew, including the commanding officer died and 59 survivors were rescued by the USS Schenck (DD 159), which found U-645 (Ferro) later the same day, evaded a torpedo and sinks the U-boat with depth charges.

Hit by U-boat
Sunk on 24 Dec 1943 by U-275 (Bork).

Commands listed for USS Leary (i) (DD 158)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Ethelbert Watts, USN17 Apr 19388 Jan 1941
2Lt. William Lockhart Harmon, USN8 Jan 1941Mar 1941
3Lt.Cdr. Clifford Ashton Fines, USNMar 194115 Dec 1941
4John Connor Atkeson, USN15 Dec 194111 Aug 1942
5T/Lt.Cdr. James Ellsworth Kyes, USN11 Aug 194224 Dec 1943 (+)

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Notable events involving Leary (i) include:

24 Dec 1943
On 24 Dec 1943 she was part of the escort for USS Card, when she was hit by 3 torpedoes, fired by U-275. 97 of her crew of 149 were lost. ( 1 )

Media links


U-Boat Attack Logs
Daniel Morgan and Bruce Taylor


DD-158 Leary

The first Leary (DD-158) was laid down 6 March 1918 by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N.J. launched 18 December 1918, sponsored by Mrs. Anne Leary, mother of Lt. C. F. Leary and commissioned 5 December 1919, Comdr. F. C. Martin in command.

Leary departed Boston 28 January 1920 for Guantanamo on shakedown and training, then continued her training in northern waters before transiting the Panama Canal 28 January 1921 to join the Battle Fleet in the Pacific. Upon completion of large-scale maneuvers off the coast of Peru in February, she returned to the Caribbean where in June she observed the effects of seaplane bombardment upon ex-German ships. In the wake of the Washington Naval Disarmament Conference, Leary was placed out of commission in reserve at Philadelphia Navy Yard 29 June 1922.

Reactivating 8 years later, on 1 May 1930 she Joined the Atlantic Fleet with Newport, R.I., as her home port. In addition to annual exercises in the Caribbean, every other year she operated off the West Coast in joint maneuvers with the Pacific Fleet. After 1935 training cruises for reserves and midshipmen occupied most of her time.

The rising war clouds over Europe changed this schedule. In September 1939 destroyers Leary and Hamilton (DD-141) established a continuous antisubmarine patrol off the lower New England coast. The following year her patrol functions enlarged and 9 September 1941 she began a series of hazardous escort missions to Iceland. On 19 November Leary became the first American ship to make radar contact with a U-boat. After 26 February 1942 she spent a year escorting convoys from the midocean meeting point to various Icelandic ports.

Leary departed this duty 7 February 1943 for Boston and a new area of service. Emerging from drydock the old four-stacker departed Boston 1 March for Guantanamo Naval Base where she engaged in antisubmarine exercises with R-5 before resuming escort duty, guarding four convoys to Trinidad, British West Indies, between mid march and mid-June 1943. She returned to New York 25 June.

Leary now began transatlantic escort voyages to guard ever-increasing amounts of supplies from the United States to the Mediterranean. She picked up a convoy off New York harbor 7 July, sailed first to Aruba, Dutch West Indies, and then across to Algiers, arriving the 31st. A return convoy using the same route entered New York 27 August. A second voyage concluded 30 October but Leary would not return from her third transatlantic assignment of 1943.

Late in November she departed the East Coast with escort carrier Card (CVE 11) on a hunter-killer operation. Early in the mid-watch 24 December, Leary suddenly found herself in the midst of a German submarine pack. Leary took two torpedoes within minutes of her discovery of the enemy and a third torpedo finally sank this valiant ship. Ninety-seven members of the ship's company were lost, including her commanding officer, Comdr. James E. Kyes.


USS Leary DD-158 (1918-1943)

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Contents

Leary departed Boston 28 January 1920 for Guantanamo Bay on shakedown and training, then continued her training in northern waters before transiting the Panama Canal 22 January 1921 to join the Battle Fleet in the Pacific. Upon completion of large-scale maneuvers off the coast of Peru in February, she returned to the Caribbean where in June she observed the effects of seaplane bombardment upon ex-German ships. In the wake of the Washington Naval Disarmament Conference, Leary was placed out of commission in reserve at Philadelphia Navy Yard 29 June 1922.

Reactivating 8 years later, on 1 May 1930 she joined the Atlantic Fleet with Newport, Rhode Island, as her home port. In addition to annual exercises in the Caribbean, every other year she operated off the West Coast in joint maneuvers with the Pacific Fleet. After 1935, training cruises for reserves and midshipmen occupied most of her time.

In April 1937, Leary became the first United States naval vessel to be equipped with search radar, which was installed by the Naval Research Laboratory. The radar set included separate antennae to send and receive in the VHF band (1.5 m). [ 1 ]

World War II

In September 1939, Leary and Hamilton established a continuous antisubmarine patrol off the lower New England coast. The following year her patrol functions enlarged and 9 September 1941 she began a series of hazardous escort missions to Iceland. On 19 November, Leary became the first American ship to make radar contact with a U-boat. After 26 February 1942, she spent a year escorting convoys from the midocean meeting point to various Icelandic ports.

Leary departed this duty 7 February 1943 for Boston and a new area of service. Emerging from drydock the old four-stacker departed Boston 1 March for Guantanamo Bay Naval Base where she engaged in antisubmarine exercises with R-5 before resuming escort duty, guarding four convoys to Trinidad, British West Indies, between mid-March and mid-June 1943. She returned to New York 25 June.

Leary now began transatlantic escort voyages to guard ever-increasing amounts of supplies from the United States to the Mediterranean. She picked up a convoy off New York harbor 7 July, sailed first to Aruba, Dutch West Indies, and then across to Algiers, arriving the 31st. A return convoy using the same route entered New York 27 August. A second voyage concluded 30 October.

Late in November she departed the East Coast with Card on a hunter-killer operation. Early in the mid-watch 24 December, Leary suddenly found herself in the midst of a German "wolfpack". Leary took two torpedoes from U-275 within minutes of her discovery of the enemy and a third torpedo finally sank her. Ninety-seven members of the ship’s company were lost, including her commanding officer, Commander James E. Kyes. There is a memorial to James Kyes erected by his classmates at Annapolis. It is located at the site of the abandoned mining town of Monte Cristo in the Cascade Mountains in eastern Snohomish County Washington, where his family ran a hotel. It sits under a large tree he planted as a young boy. There are no buildings left at the town site only the memorial and the tree. It is a 4-mile hike to reach Monte Cristo, as the road is not open to automobiles. The destroyer James E. Kyes was named for Commander James E. Kyes.


After shakedown off Bermuda, we joined the Pacific war in May 1944, commencing with an escort assignment between Eniwetok and Saipan in the Mariana Islands and anti-submarine patrols. Attached to Destroyer Squadron 56, our first action was shore bombardment on sector four, Tinian Island.

In the Palau Islands operation, 12&ndash28 September, we participated in shore bombardment and the support of Marines and Underwater Demolition Teams at Peleliu and Anguar Islands. We were also assigned to a search and destroy task unit, searching back bays for Japanese ships. We also rescued a Navy fighter pilot who had ditched at sea.

Moving to the Philippines for the landings on Leyte Island, 18 October, Leary provided bombardment and fire support through 21 November. On 20 October, when Honolulu (CL 48) was struck by an aerial torpedo, we went alongside to provide damage control and medical assistance and took aboard 26 casualties.

For the impending Battle of Surigao Strait, 25 October, DesRon 56 was formed into three sections. When the Japanese Southern Force approached, torpedo section one&mdashNewcomb, Leary and Albert W. Grant, in that order&mdashproceeded down the middle of the strait to deliver a torpedo attack on the Japanese Southern Force.

We were set up to launch torpedoes to starboard. As we closed our target, however, it changed course from north to west. We changed course to southwest and quickly reset our torpedoes to launch to port.

Pressing our attack, we fired three torpedoes at 7200 yards and observed two precisely-timed heavy explosions, indicating hits on the Japanese flagship, battleship Yamashiro, which contributing to its sinking.

Meanwhile, we were in a direct line of fire between the Japanese and American battleships. During our torpedo run, the battlelines opened fire and their projectiles arched over us in both directions. They looked like red balls of fire and sounded like freight trains&mdashit was an awsome sight.

Silhouetted by gun flashes from both battle lines, our section began to take heavy fire from both sides. Leary and Newcomb were narrowly missed but Grant was hit and severely damaged. Turning to the north, we also evaded four torpedoes&mdashtwo on each side&mdashwhich passed the ship on parallel courses. Many a man asked God to see us through that night.

After the heavy ships ceased fire, we and Newcomb returned to the Grant and assisted in damage control and anti-aircraft defense. At 1023, we tied up port side to the Grant. In addition to giving her assistance, we also transfered 135 rounds of 5-inch and 190 rounds of powder.

At 1400 we found ourselves under air attack. We cut loose from the Grant and eleven minutes later splashed a &ldquoTojo.&rdquo Thereafter, ocean tug Chickasaw (ATF 83) took the Grant under tow and we escorted them to the southern transport area.

On 1 November, while attached with the squadron to Radm. G.L. Weyler&rsquos Task Group 77.1, Seventh Fleet Covering Forces operating off Leyte Gulf, the &ldquoArpy&rdquo was a target in the first coordinated suicide plane attack of the war. After Claxton was hit and nearly sunk that morning, DesDiv 48 flagship Abner Read screened her as she regained propulsion. Later in the day, when Read was hit and sunk&mdashthe first destroyer lost to this new Kamikaze tactic&mdashwe joined Claxton in rescue operations. When another plane (a &ldquoVal&rdquo dive-bomber) dove on us, we and Claxton shot it down&mdashit crashed close aboard our starboard quarter. Later, we rescued 70 Read survivors including ComDesDiv 48 and the ship's CO and XO, four other officers and 63 enlisted men. We also engaged a submarine and numerous aircraft.

On 20 November 1944, while on radar picket duty in Surigao Strait, we received from PT 491 nine battle casualties from PT 495 for medical treatment. After being relieved on station, we delivered the PT casualties to hospital ship LST 1025.

On 1 January 1945, Leary departed Kossol Passage, Palau Islands, as a member of the Luzon Island invasion force. We proceeded to Leyte Gulf, through the Philippine Islands to the South.China Sea, then steamed north to Lingayen Gulf, where our primary role was shore bombardment. Soon, heavy suicide plant attacks began. On 6 January, during one such attack, we severely damaged an incoming &ldquoIrving&rdquo fighter, which managed to graze our forward 5-inch gun mounts before crashing&mdashour only &ldquodamage&rdquo of the war. Later that day, we also shot down a &ldquoJill.&rdquo

Amid continuing air attacks, we continued shore bombardment and call fire on Luzon until 18 January, shooting down another &ldquoVal.&rdquo

From 15 February&ndash16 March 1945, with the squadron supporting the invasion of Iwo Jima, Leary again provided shore bombardment and call fire in support of the Marines. Air attacks were light. While on fire support station close in on Mount Suribachi, we observed the American flag being raised on top of the mountain. On 22 February, while on radar picket duty, we rescued seven Marines adrift in LVT 96 about 30 miles off the island.

From 25 March&ndash28 May 1945, Leary moved to the invasion of Okinawa. On 6 April, when DesRon 2 flagship Morris was hit, we and converted destroyer escort Daniel T. Griffin (APD 38) assisted with firefighting and taking aboard wounded. That same day, Leary became Capt. Roland Smoot&rsquos DesRon 56 flagship after Newcomb was severely damaged.

During the Okinawa operation, we engaged in shore bombardment and radar picket duty, and destroyed two suicide boats and numerous attacking aircraft. We also depth charged a submarine and rescued a Marine fighter pilot who had ditched at sea. This duty continued until 28 May when, having expended more than 22,000 5-inch rounds, we returned to Leyte Gulf where we were regunned by destroyer tender Sierra (AD 18).

After returning to Okinawa 1 July, Leary was soon reassigned to the Aleutian Islands, for which we departed 27 July. We dropped anchor at Adak on VJ Day, August 14, then proceeded to Attu.

In September, after the surrender, we steamed with an Occupation Task Force to Ominato Naval Base in northern Honshu. After continuing on to Tokyo Bay, we departed 30 September for San Diego via Guam and Pearl Harbor, arriving home 22 October.

The &ldquoArpy&rdquo decommissioned 10 December 1946 and was transferred to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. On 10 March, 1959, again with Heywood L. Edwards, she was transferred to the Japanese Defense Force and renamed Yugure (&ldquoevening&rdquo, &ldquodusk&rdquo or &ldquoautumn twilight&rdquo). She was returned to US custody 10 March 1974, stricken from Naval Vessel Register on 18 March, and sold to China Dismantled Vessel Trading Corp., Taipei, Taiwan 1 July 1976 for scrapping.

Richard P. Leary earned six engagement stars on her Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Ribbon and two on her Philippine Liberation Ribbon for action in World War II, and was recommended for a Navy Unit Commendation.

Richard P. Leary was a stalwart of the bombardment and fire support destroyers, frequently congratulated for her gunnery and recommended for a Navy Unit Commendation by our combat commanders, ComDesRon 56 and ComDesPac.

Our captains received the Navy Cross, Silver Star, Bronze Stars and Legion of Merit. Liberty during our entire war patrol consisted of four hours ashore on some desolate island as time permitted between operations.

We, the crew of the Leary, know that any destroyer sailor worth his salt believes that his ship is the best in the fleet. The difference between him and us is he thinks so but we know so.


The table below contains the names of sailors who served aboard the USS Leary (DD 879). Please keep in mind that this list does only include records of people who submitted their information for publication on this website. If you also served aboard and you remember one of the people below you can click on the name to send an email to the respective sailor. Would you like to have such a crew list on your website?

Looking for US Navy memorabilia? Try the Ship's Store.

There are 68 crew members registered for the USS Leary (DD 879).

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1969 | 1970 &ndash now

NameRank/RatePeriodDivisionRemarks/Photo
Wilson, Robert (Willie)SEAMAN/BM31970 &ndash 1971Weapons
Plumb, SteveBT 31970 &ndash 1973EngineeringHonor to serve.
Watkins, DannyHTFNMar 1970 &ndash 1974REPAIR
Maziarz, PeterBT 3Sep 1970 &ndash Oct 1973M1Med Cruise of 1971/72 had a lot of good memories. Forward Fireroom with Steve Plumb, George Williams, George Burke and several others. Experience of a lifetime. 19 yrs old and in the Mediterranean for 7 months.
Bales, Marty ETRSNDec 1970 &ndash Jun 1973IOI would do it again. remember the ET Group Dipalo, Jim Miller, Armstrong, Ziobro, Maphis, Tedeski, Molinar, Hansen. Good People all of them.
Springer, EdBT3Dec 14, 1970 &ndash Oct 30, 1973Engineering - M-1Assigned after fire room. First ship and always the best.
Johnson, Tedbt31971 &ndash 1972btafter fireroom I remember Putnam, Smitty, Reevse,Worly, Shidie, Sheerwood, Munn, The Med cruise was great had alot of fun. I remember trying to see who was fastist on burners. I never blew the relief valve!
Ellis, MikeGMT 21971 &ndash 1973Weapons (AS)Enjoy thinking about my friends Fedders, Baldwin, Anderson, Lavan, Lily, etc.. So many friends, so long ago! Thanks for the memories.
Doms, KennethBT FIREMANApr 2, 1971 &ndash Jun 1, 1973BWorked In Foward Boilerroom.
Dowd, Claude "Cp"MM2Sep 1971 &ndash Nov 1973A-GangGood Memories. Left USN 1975. College then dental school. Still practicing general dentistry in Fayetteville, NC.
Brown, LarrySK3Sep 19, 1971 &ndash Sep 19, 1973store keeper 3rd classwas a good time in my live glad i joined seen half the world and that is a lot for a small town boy
Redden, AlfredRM3Oct 1971 &ndash Sep 1973OperationsGreat Ship on Med cruse 71-72. We have a reunion every year. Get in touch for information. 308-530-1284 or E-Mail. All members of ship are welcome 1945-74. Family members are welcome also.
Del Sesto, RobDK2Nov 1971 &ndash Jul 1972Supply Division (Disbursing office)I still keep in touch with our Supply Officer, Joe Williamson. I'd like to re-connect with BM2 Jim Bowden, SH2 Hartje, FTG3 Mauser and anyone else from aboard the ship during that Mediterranean cruise of 1971-1972
Schroeder, Arthur (George)FR1972 &ndash 1973 Snipe, hung out with Randy Cremasco, Phil Prestano, Mike Vanmiller, Bernie Sundean, and I wish I could remember the others. Good times. I remember raceing the Germans into San Wan
Prestano, PhilipFR1972 &ndash 1973Main ControlHi George Schroeder Hi to all on the USS Leary i had a Great time on the Leary. I remember Randy Cremasco, Mike Vanmiller, Bernie Sundean, Neil Riley, Cox, and all the Rest of the crew
Jimmie, LouisENFAJan 1972 &ndash Nov 1973A-Gang
Engelhardt, Gary IC2Jan 1, 1972 &ndash Jan 1, 1973R DivisionUsed to hang out with Walter Horne, Dave Coxon, Brad James, Boner McGarry John Washnak, Lou Jimmie, Lasky, Mike Ninkovich, Lou Wright. Athens Greece, Kusadasi Turkey, GP of Monaco . Weeks of fun in Palma de Mallorca
View 'now' Photo
Manasco, JimmyBTFNJul 20, 1972 &ndash Nov 25, 1973M1 AFTER FIREROOM
Watrous, WilliamSAOct 1972 &ndash Nov 19731st
Furr, JoeFN3Oct 1972 &ndash Apr 1973Engine room #2Short assignment before they sold this ship but the best one I had. Worked with Rainwater,big Frank(seek) and lots of others. Anyone remember me feel free to contact
Moore, MikeTMSNOct 20, 1972 &ndash 1973ASremember "Duke" George and John Lilly wild times in San Juan Christmas in Gitmo
Kelley, Melvin ( Common Bob )mmOct 22, 1972 &ndash Mar 2, 1973eng ( snipe )Hay! Hornback, holt ,rainwater, big zeek ,k cox ,elec.Fitzgeral morris l goodwin, manasco bt, big holt ,broush,
Holt, LarryBTFNDec 3, 1972 &ndash Aug 31, 1973M-1After Fireroom with Putnam, Worley, Springer, Eagle, Munn, Bowlin, Radish, Overturf, Barnes Sherwood, Scott, Schmidt and some others who's names I can't recall. After all, it's been over 36 years!!
Martín, Antonio Jan 6, 1981 &ndash Dec 28, 1981 Serví en el DD879 cuando era buque español. En España su nombre era Lángara D64. A bordo tuve uno de los mejores años de mi vida. Saludos a todos los tripulantes americanos y españoles a lo largo de la vida de este maravilloso barco.G

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1969 | 1970 &ndash now


Leary I DD- 158 - History

Papers (1918-1957) including personal letters, correspondence, official naval orders, certificate of award and promotion, photographs, biographical sketches, etc.

Biographical/historical information

Charles H. Eglee (1894-1973) was born in Flushing, NY, attended Brookline and Boston, MA, schools, and Harvard University (1913-1915), and worked at a shipyard (1916). He enlisted in the United States Navy (January 30, 1918) and was assigned to a patrol boat in Casco Bay, ME. He was accepted into the 4th Reserve Class at the United States Naval Academy (USNA) in Annapolis, MD (June 7, 1918). Eglee also belonged to the Connecticut Naval Militia and served as executive officer of the 18th Division. He remained active in the United States Naval Reserve (USNR) until he retired in 1945 with the rank of lieutenant commander.

Scope and arrangement

The collection primarily consists of official USNR correspondence and communications regarding Eglee's active duty and naval career. Included are official correspondences on drills and training cruises, the re-commissioning of destroyers by Reserve naval officers, annual fitness reports, duty status, and promotion notifications (1920, 1932, 1940). Other correspondence pertains to Eglee's enrollment in the Connecticut Naval Militia.

Eglee was first stationed on the battleship USS MICHIGAN (BB-27). Early records pertain to Eglee's assignment on the destroyer USS MCDOUGAL (DD-54) that took part in the first crossing of the Atlantic by Navy seaplanes (1919). Furthercorrespondence concerns Eglee's short-term positions as commanding officer of the subchaser USS SC-271 (1923) and patrol craft USS Eagle No. 27 (PE-27, 1924). Correspondence, roster lists, watch lists, and other information concern Eglee's assignments on the destroyer USS BAINBRIDGE (DD-246 1926) the battleship USS NEW YORK (BB-34 1937) the destroyer USS LEARY (DD-158 1938) and his position as commanding officer of the 18th Division, 5th Battalion stationed on board the USS WYOMING (Battleship No. 32, 1939) and USS THATCHER (Destroyer No. 162, 1940). Other materials pertain to Eglee's service in the National Guard and Naval Militia flood disaster relief.

Further correspondence and records concern Eglee's duties at the section base in San Juan, Puerto Rico (1941), and at the U.S. Naval Personnel Distribution Center, Pleasanton, CA (1942) his treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis (1942, 1944) his USNR discharge (June 30, 1945) his efforts to obtain full government disability benefits (1945-1950) and Naval War College correspondence courses (1946-1947).

Other materials include certificates of award and promotion, including oversized items (1919-1947) newspaper clippings USNR photographs of Eglee, his USNA class, the BAINBRIDGE, and MICHIGAN a biographical sketch of Eglee and other memorabilia. Four publications concerning the Connecticut armed forces, Eglee's USNR class (1918), and the U.S. Naval Training and Distribution Center finish the collection.

Administrative information
Custodial History

October 5, 1994 , 446 items Papers (1918-1957) of U.S. Naval Reserve officer, U.S. Naval Academy (Reserve) Class of 1918, including correspondence, photographs, newsletters, naval activity programs, regulations, memorandums, medical records, clippings, certificates, and naval militia yearbooks. Gift of Mr. Donald R. Eglee, Eastham, MA.

June 21, 2001 (unprocessed addition 1), 1 Container, 281 items, 0.2 cubic feet Papers (1918-1972) relating to his service in the United States Navy and Naval Reserve, including original manuscript and printed (photocopy) copies of his history, "United States Naval Militia, 1894-1945," (1949), with clippings, related to the Naval Militia Veterans Association (1949-72), and a folder of orders he received (1918-47). Donor: Nancy H. Eglee.


Service history

Leary was laid down on 6 March 1918 and launched on 18 December 1918. She was sponsored by Mrs. Anne Leary, the mother of Clarence F. Leary. She was commissioned on 5 December 1919 under the command of Commander F. C. Martin. [3]

She departed Boston on 28 January 1920, [3] underwent her shakedown cruise in the Caribbean and then conducted training operations along the East Coast of the United States. In January 1921, she joined the Pacific Battle Fleet, and through February took part in a large-scale battle exercise off the coast of Peru. In March, Leary transited the Panama Canal and reported to the commander of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. She then was on station during bombing tests conducted by the U.S. Army Air Forces against naval targets, overseen by Billy Mitchell. She resumed her training exercises off the Caribbean until June 1922, when in accordance with the Washington Naval Conference, she was decommissioned at the Philadelphia Naval Yard. [6]

Recommissioned on 1 May 1930 with a home port in Newport, Rhode Island, [7] Leary alternated between the Pacific Fleet and the Atlantic Fleet, carrying out training maneuvers and taking part in several fleet problems. [6] After 1935, most of her time was taken up conducting training cruises for reserves and midshipmen. [3] In April 1937, she underwent a shipyard overhaul, including being equipped with a radar. Leary was the first U.S. navy vessel to be equipped with the device. In September 1939, Leary and Hamilton established a continuous patrol off the coast of New England against German U-boats. [8] On 9 September 1941, she began escort missions to Iceland. [3] She was also the first to make contact with a German U-boat, while escorting a British convoy in the North Atlantic on 9 November 1941. [9]

With the entry of the United States into World War II following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Leary undertook regular convoy escort duties. [9] After 26 February 1942, she spent a year escorting convoys from a mid-ocean meeting point to Icelandic ports. On 7 February 1943, she left for Boston and reassignment. [3] During this time, she was given a shipyard overhaul at Boston Navy Yard and converted into an anti-submarine warfare ship. On 1 March, she left Boston for Guantanamo Bay, and undertook anti-submarine exercises with R-5. She then resumed escort duty, and made several trips to Trinidad and several Caribbean ports. [3] Returning to New York on 25 June, she began escorting transatlantic convoys, and successfully escorted two of them through Aruba and to Algiers and Casablanca. [3] She later joined Task Group 21.41 under the command of Captain Arnold J. Isbell and escorting Card. [9]

On 24 December 1943, the task group was caught in a storm in the North Atlantic when at 01:58 in the morning, Leary made a ping on a U-boat off her starboard bow. After her commander, James E. Kyes, ordered her to battle stations but before the destroyer could react, she was struck by a G7es torpedo fired by the German submarine   U-275. The torpedo struck her starboard side and detonated in the after engine room, killing all of the men there and damaging both propeller shafts. She quickly developed a 20 degree list to starboard, and was unable to move in the heavy seas. Unbeknownst to the task group, a second German submarine, U-382 fired at Leary but missed. Soon after, Kyes ordered the crew to abandon ship. Two additional torpedoes from U-275 rocked the ship, and it rapidly sank, stern first. [9] [8] She took 98 men with her, including Kyes. Survivors were picked up by her sister ship, Schenck. [10]

Three or four minutes after the second torpedo hit, the executive officer, Lt. R. B. Watson, concluded a quick inspection of the ship, during which he found a thick, gooey substance covering the deck. He was astonished to see two seamen sitting on a torpedo tube, calmly eating Boston cream pie. The cook had just baked a batch, the explosion spattering most of it on the deck. [11]

Leary received one battle star for her service in World War II. For his actions in ensuring the safety of his crew, Kyes was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. The Gearing-class destroyer James E. Kyes was later named for him. [10]


Mục lục

Leary là một trong số 111 chiếc tàu khu trục thuộc lớp Wickes được Hải quân Hoa Kỳ chế tạo từ năm 1917 đến năm 1919. Nó cùng với 9 tàu chị em khác được chế tạo tại xưởng đóng tàu của hãng New York Shipbuilding Corporation ở Camden, New Jersey, theo những đặc tính kỹ thuật và bản vẽ chi tiết do Bath Iron Works thiết kế. [2] [3]

Nó có trọng lượng choán nước tiêu chuẩn 1.090 tấn (1.070 tấn Anh 1.200 tấn thiếu), chiều dài chung 314 foot (96 m), mạn thuyền rộng 30 foot 6 inch (9,30 m) và mớn nước sâu 12 foot (3,7 m). Khi chạy thử máy, Leary đạt được tốc độ tối đa 35 kn (65 km/h). Nó được trang bị bốn khẩu pháo 4 in (100 mm)/50 caliber, hai khẩu 3 in (76 mm)/23 caliber và mười hai ống phóng ngư lôi ngư lôi 21 in (530 mm). Thành phần thủy thủ đoàn bao gồm 122 sĩ quan và thủy thủ. [4] Con tàu được vận hành bởi hai turbine hơi nước Curtis và bốn nồi hơi Yarrow. [2]

Chi tiết về tính năng thể hiện của Leary không được biết rõ, nhưng nó nằm trong nhóm tàu khu trục lớp Wickes được gọi không chính thức là "Kiểu Liberty" để phân biệt với nhóm được chế tạo dựa trên bản vẽ chi tiết do hãng Bath Iron Works thiết kế, vốn sử dụng turbine Parsons hay Westinghouse. Những chiếc nhóm Liberty bị xuống cấp nhanh chóng trong phục vụ, và cho đến năm 1929 tất cả 60 chiếc trong nhóm này được Hải quân cho nghỉ hưu. Đặc tính thể hiện thực sự của các con tàu này thấp hơn nhiều so với tính năng được kỳ vọng, đặc biệt là khía cạnh hiệu suất nhiên liệu, khi hầu hết chỉ đi được 2.300 nmi (4.300 km) ở tốc độ 15 kn (28 km/h) thay vì 3.100 nmi (5.700 km) ở 20 kn (37 km/h) theo thiết kế tiêu chuẩn. [2] [5] Lớp cũng gặp vấn đề khi bẻ lái và trọng lượng. [6]

Leary được đặt lườn vào ngày 6 tháng 3 năm 1918 và được hạ thủy vào ngày 18 tháng 12 năm 1918, được đỡ đầu bởi bà Anne Leary, mẹ của Trung úy Hải quân Clarence F. Leary, và được đưa ra hoạt động vào ngày 5 tháng 12 năm 1919 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Trung tá Hải quân F. C. Martin. [4] Nó là chiếc tàu chiến đầu tiên của Hải quân Hoa Kỳ được đặt tên theo Trung úy Leary, người được truy tặng huân chương Chữ thập Hải quân trong Thế Chiến I. Nó được tiếp nối bởi chiếc USS Leary (DD-879), một tàu khu trục lớp Gearing hoàn tất vào năm 1945. [4]

Giữa hai cuộc thế chiến Sửa đổi

Leary khởi hành từ Boston vào ngày 28 tháng 1 năm 1920 [4] cho chuyến đi chạy thử máy tại vùng biển Caribe, rồi tiến hành các hoạt động huấn luyện dọc theo bờ Đông Hoa Kỳ. Vào tháng 1 năm 1921, nó gia nhập Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương, và cho đến tháng 2 đã tham gia cuộc tập trận quy mô lớn ngoài khơi bờ biển Peru. Sang tháng 3, Leary băng qua kênh đào Panama và trình diện để hoạt động tại Căn cứ Hải quân vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba. Sau đó nó tham gia giám sát các cuộc thử nghiệm ném bom xuống các mục tiêu hải quân do Không lực Lục quân Hoa Kỳ dưới sự chỉ đạo của Billy Mitchell. Nó quay lại các hoạt động thực tập huấn luyện tại vùng biển Caribe cho đến tháng 6 năm 1922. Nhằm tuân thủ những điều khoản hạn chế vũ trang của Hiệp ước Hải quân Washington, nó được cho xuất biên chế tại Xưởng hải quân Philadelphia và đưa về lực lượng dự bị. [7]

Được cho nhập biên chế trở lại vào ngày 1 tháng 5 năm 1930 với cảng nhà được đặt tại Newport, Rhode Island, [8] Leary luân phiên các hoạt động cùng với Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương và Hạm đội Đại Tây Dương, tiến hành các cuộc cơ động huấn luyện và tham gia nhiều cuộc tập trận Vấn đề Hạm đội. [7] Sau năm 1935, hầu hết thời gian của nó dành cho các chuyến đi huấn luyện quân nhân dự bị và học viên mới. [4] Vào tháng 4 năm 1937, nó trải qua một đợt đại tu, bao gồm việc trang bị radar Leary là chiếc tàu chiến Hoa Kỳ đầu tiên được lắp thiết bị này. Đến tháng 9 năm 1939, LearyHamilton tiến hành tuần tra liên tục ngoài khơi bờ biển New England chống lại tàu ngầm U-boat Đức. [9] Vào ngày 9 tháng 9 năm 1941, nó bắt đầu các nhiệm vụ hộ tống đến tận Iceland. [4] Nó cũng là chiếc tàu chiến Mỹ đầu tiên phát hiện một tàu ngầm U-Boat Đức đang khi hộ tống một đoàn tàu vận tải Anh vượt Bắc Đại Tây Dương vào ngày 9 tháng 11 năm 1941. [10]

Thế Chiến II Sửa đổi

Với việc Hoa Kỳ chính thức tham gia Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai sau khi Nhật Bản bất ngờ tấn công Trân Châu Cảng, Leary đảm trách nhiệm vụ hộ tống vận tải. [10] Từ ngày 26 tháng 2 năm 1942, nó trải qua một năm hộ tống các đoàn tàu vận tải từ một điểm hẹn giữa đại dương đến các cảng Iceland. Vào ngày 7 tháng 2 năm 1943, nó lên đường quay trở về Boston, [4] trải qua một giai đoạn đại tu tại Xưởng hải quân Boston đồng thời được cải biến thành một tàu chống tàu ngầm. Vào ngày 1 tháng 3, nó rời Boston đi vịnh Guantánamo thực tập chống tàu ngầm cùng với chiếc R-5. Sau đó, nó tiếp tục nhiệm vụ hộ tống vận tải, thực hiện nhiều chuyến đi đến Trinidad cùng nhiều cảng tại vùng biển Caribe. [4] Quay trở về New York vào ngày 25 tháng 6, nó bắt đầu hộ tống các đoàn tàu vượt đại dương, bảo vệ thành công hai đoàn tàu đi qua Aruba đến Algiers và Casablanca. [4] Sau đó, nó gia nhập Đội đặc nhiệm 21.41 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Đại tá Hải quân Arnold J. Isbell để bảo vệ cho tàu sân bay hộ tống Card. [10]

Vào ngày 24 tháng 12 năm 1943, đội đặc nhiệm gặp phải một cơn bão tại Bắc Đại Tây Dương, và lúc 01 giờ 58 phút, Leary dò được tín hiệu sonar của một chiếc U-boat đối phương bên mạn phải. Chỉ huy con tàu James E. Kyes ra tín hiệu báo động, nhưng trước khi chiếc tàu khu trục kịp phản ứng, nó trúng một quả ngư lôi G7es phóng từ tàu ngầm U-275. Quả ngư lôi đánh trúng mạn phải con tàu, phát nổ trong phòng động cơ phía sau, làm thiệt mạng mọi người tại đây và làm hỏng cả hai trục chân vịt. Nó nhanh chóng bị nghiêng 20 độ sang mạn phải, và không thể di chuyển trong hoàn cảnh biển động nặng. Hoàn toàn không bị đội tìm-diệt phát hiện, một chiếc U-boat thứ hai, U-382, cũng khai hỏa nhắm vào Leary nhưng bị trượt. Không lâu sau đó, Kyes ra lệnh cho thủy thủ đoàn bỏ tàu. Hai quả ngư lôi khác phóng từ U-275 lại đánh trúng, làm rung động mạnh con tàu, và nó chìm nhanh chóng với đuôi chìm trước. [10] [9] Nó mang theo cùng với nó 98 thành viên thủy thủ đoàn, bao gồm chỉ huy Kyes. Những người sống sót được tàu chị em Schenck cứu vớt. [11]

Leary được tặng thưởng một Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II. Do hành động dũng cảm để đảm bảo an toàn cho thủy thủ đoàn dưới quyền, hạm trưởng James E. Kyes được truy tặng Huân chương Chữ thập Hải quân. Chiếc tàu khu trục USS James E. Kyes (DD-787) thuộc lớp Gearing sau này được đặt tên nhằm tôn vinh ông. [11]


Watch the video: Carroll County Board of DD - Greysons Story (January 2022).