Information

Minaret Top, Ali Mosque, Isfahan



Shah Mosque (Isfahan)

The Shah Mosque (Persian: مسجد شاه ‎) is a mosque located in Isfahan, Iran. It is located on the south side of Naghsh-e Jahan Square. It was built during the Safavid dynasty under the order of Shah Abbas I of Persia.

It is regarded as one of the masterpieces of Persian architecture in the Islamic era. The Royal Mosque is registered, along with the Naghsh-e Jahan Square, as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. [2] Its construction began in 1611, and its splendour is mainly due to the beauty of its seven-colour mosaic tiles and calligraphic inscriptions.

The mosque is depicted on the reverse of the Iranian 20,000 rials banknote. [3]


Minaret Top, Ali Mosque, Isfahan - History

The Ali Mosque and Minaret were built during the rule of Seljuk sultan Sanjar (1118-1157) in the mid-twelfth century. The minaret retains its Seljuk decorative brickwork while the mosque was largely rebuilt and redecorated during the rule of Safavid Shah Ismail I (1501-1524).

The mosque is based on the four-iwan typology, with vaulted prayer halls centered on iwans on four sides of an open courtyard. The qibla wing to the south of the courtyard has a domed sanctuary with a mihrab and minbar. The street elevation is composed of an arched portal recess flanked by two shallow niches of equal size and a narrow panel with a blind arch. It is covered entirely with tile mosaics and tile panels featuring floral and geometric motifs in turquoise, blue and white. A gilded thuluth inscription, signed by calligrapher Shams al-Din Tabrizi, envelops the interior of the portal recess it commemorates the Safavid reconstruction by master builder Mizra Kamal al-Din. The ribbed star vault of the portal is also decorated with tiles, including a panel above the doorway signed in 1522 by tile-cutter Musaddiq. Blue and turquoise tiles were also used on the exterior of the sanctuary dome, which features large floral motifs and a broad inscriptive band with white kufic characters.

The Seljuk minaret rises immediately to the right of the mosque portal and is built entirely of brick. It is about forty-eight meters tall and has a tapering cylindrical shaft interrupted by two balconies. The shaft below the balconies is decorated halfway with a pattern of interlocking stars in recess, changing into a finer diamond pattern in the upper half. The minaret has four bands of Kufic inscriptions, three of which are highlighted with glazed tiles.

Hillenbrand, Robert. Islamic Architecture: Form, Function, and Meaning. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000. 112,154.

Blunt, Wilfrid. Isfahan: Pearl of Asia. London: Elek Books, 1966.

"Masjed-e-'Ali". Isfahan Webserver. http://www.isfahan.org.uk/masali/masali.html. [Accessed August 1, 2013]

Pope, Arthur Upham. Persian Architecture: The Triumph of Form and Color. New York: George Braziller, 1965.


Minaret Top, Ali Mosque, Isfahan - History

The Ali Mosque and Minaret were built during the rule of Seljuk sultan Sanjar (1118-1157) in the mid-twelfth century. The minaret retains its Seljuk decorative brickwork while the mosque was largely rebuilt and redecorated during the rule of Safavid Shah Ismail I (1501-1524).

The mosque is based on the four-iwan typology, with vaulted prayer halls centered on iwans on four sides of an open courtyard. The qibla wing to the south of the courtyard has a domed sanctuary with a mihrab and minbar. The street elevation is composed of an arched portal recess flanked by two shallow niches of equal size and a narrow panel with a blind arch. It is covered entirely with tile mosaics and tile panels featuring floral and geometric motifs in turquoise, blue and white. A gilded thuluth inscription, signed by calligrapher Shams al-Din Tabrizi, envelops the interior of the portal recess it commemorates the Safavid reconstruction by master builder Mizra Kamal al-Din. The ribbed star vault of the portal is also decorated with tiles, including a panel above the doorway signed in 1522 by tile-cutter Musaddiq. Blue and turquoise tiles were also used on the exterior of the sanctuary dome, which features large floral motifs and a broad inscriptive band with white kufic characters.

The Seljuk minaret rises immediately to the right of the mosque portal and is built entirely of brick. It is about forty-eight meters tall and has a tapering cylindrical shaft interrupted by two balconies. The shaft below the balconies is decorated halfway with a pattern of interlocking stars in recess, changing into a finer diamond pattern in the upper half. The minaret has four bands of Kufic inscriptions, three of which are highlighted with glazed tiles.

Hillenbrand, Robert. Islamic Architecture: Form, Function, and Meaning. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000. 112,154.

Blunt, Wilfrid. Isfahan: Pearl of Asia. London: Elek Books, 1966.

"Masjed-e-'Ali". Isfahan Webserver. http://www.isfahan.org.uk/masali/masali.html. [Accessed August 1, 2013]

Pope, Arthur Upham. Persian Architecture: The Triumph of Form and Color. New York: George Braziller, 1965.


Introduction of Ali Qapu Building

Ali Qapu Palace is one of the most beautiful monuments left during the Safavid era in Isfahan. Also, Ali Qapu Palace or Mansion located on the western side of Naghsh-e Jahan Square in Isfahan and in front of Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque. Besides, in the past, Ali qapu mansion called “Mobarakeh Naghsh-e Jahan State House” and “Dolatkhaneh Palace”. Furthermore, Ali Qapu Palace has an area of 1,800 square meters and 6 floors.

In addition, the word “Ali Qapu” composed of two excellent parts. Also, which together mean “long door” or “head on the long door”. Besides, Ali Qapu Palace was one of the largest and most magnificent buildings of its time. Also, it built in the early 11th century AH.

Ali Qapu History

The building dates back to the Safavid era in Iran and in their capital of command in Isfahan. Also, it built around 1054 AH and between 971 and 977 AH, on the orders of Shah Abbas I, who was one of the most powerful kings of Iran. Besides, although the complete completion of the finest and decorations of the Ali Qapu Mansion took place after the death of Shah Abbas I.

Moreover, the complete construction of the building of Ali Qapu Palace took place during the kingdom of Shah Abbas I, Shah Abbas II and Shah Sultan Hussein. Besides, this interval, which has taken place intermittently in the construction process, has taken nearly 100 years. Also, the foundation of the building is mostly in the time of Shah Abbas I and II. Furthermore, its restoration and decoration date back to the reign of Shah Sultan Hussein.

Location

Ali Qapu Palace located in Isfahan city on the western side of Naghsh-e Jahan Square. Also, Naghsh-e Jahan Square located in the center of Isfahan city and close to the north of the city. Besides, to get to Ali Qapu’s mansion, you have to head to Naghsh-e Jahan Square.

Moreover, Naghsh-e Jahan Square surrounded by Hafez streets on the east and Sepah Street on the west side. Moreover, both of these streets have access to the square. Besides, if you want to visit Ali Qapu Mansion, you can take your square to Sepah or Saadi streets from The Governor’s Street in the west of the square. So, if you are driving a private vehicle, Sepah Street is a good option for you because you have parking.

In addition, keep in mind that the area where Naghsh-e Jahan Square located is one of the busiest and crowded areas of Isfahan city. Also, parking capacity may be complete early on holidays and busy days. Therefore, it is better not to adjourn visiting the Ali Qapu Mansion and other sights of Naghsh-e Jahan Square to the final hours of the day.

Address: Naghsh-e-Jahan Square, Sepah St., Governor Street, Isfahan City, Iran

Visiting time: All weekdays from 9 am to 6 pm

Ali Qapu mansion ticket cost: 15000 Tomans for domestic tourists and 50000 Tomans per person for foreign tourists

On June 4 and 5, Ramadan 11, Safar 28, Tasu’a and Ashura, Ali Qapu’s mansion closed.

Iranian Art , Safavid Dynasty , Isfahan , Iran


Isfahan | Half of the world

There is no certain evidence about the formation of the city, but stories and myths attribute it to Key Kawad, mythological figure of Iranian folklore and oral tradition.
Because of the existence of “Zayandeh Rud” in the city and good regional conditions, we can see signs of humans choosing this place a residence fro 6000 years ago.
Before Islam, and specially during Sassanid dynasty, Isfahan was a place for troops to prepare themselves. And this is why the original name of the city was “ESPAHAN“ the name changed to “Isfahan” during time.

In 16th century, Shāh Abbās I chose Isfahan as the capital of Iran. Keeping the center of power from borders, Reducing the power of Qizilbash tribes and improving trade were the main reasons of the king for transferring capital from Qazvin to Isfahan.
Isfahan was the best city among all eastern cities, during Shāh Abbās I and Shāh Abbās II‘s monarchy.

Architecture

We can call Safavid dynasty the flourishing era of architecture of Isfahan. By the order of Shāh Abbās, some new parts added to the city. Chaarbagh street, Naghsh-e Jahan square and Ali Qapu building all were built with making little changes to the old parts of the town.
Safavid architecture was very miscellaneous and efficient.
The most glorious mosques, biggest schools and caravanserais, huge squares and the most beautiful streets and bridges in Isfahan date back to this dynasty.


Minaret Top, Ali Mosque, Isfahan - History

Minaret, an Earthly Element Facing the Sky
Minarets are actually a kind of different element, in comparison to the other architectural products in Iranian civilization from the viewpoint of design, construction, durability, stability, and function. This is why, in this passage, we will have a quick review of them. Minarets were used as observation posts or watch towers and guided desert caravans towards the cities both in pre-Islamic as well as the post-Islamic periods. Nowadays they stand high and proud in the cities and their outskirts.

They are of great significance both architecturally, and with their brick ornamentations, aesthetically. The name minaret comes from the word "Nar” meaning fire and originally during the Zoroastrian time was used for keeping that everlasting and sacred fire. Later in the Islamic period, they were used as a point from which to call the faithful to prayer. Cheheldokhtaran, Sareban and Ali Mosque Minarets are amongst those that will be briefly described.
Etymologically, the word "Minaret' is derived from "Nar' which means Fire' and a minaret stands for an enclosed area for making fire. Functionally, it can be divided into two types: The initial types are city minarets used in both pre-Islamic and post-Islamic periods as watchtowers, but primarily they were suitable high-rise points, allocated for making the holy fire of the Zoroaster on their tops. The fire, on the tower top, could also guide the caravans from far distances since the minaret was a relatively tall structure. Besides, in the old Islamic texture of Esfahan which had a cellular arrangement because of the sinuous and narrow routes that were subordinate upon the topography of the region to let a suitable gradient for running water in the open canals (Madi), the minarets could guide wayfarers to the location of the mosques through the alleys in the winding residential areas.
After the advent of Islam, the religious fire (Zoroastrian) kept cool on the top of minarets, but still, they preserved their functions as watchtowers and a new function was given to them, as a suitable site for the chanter (Muezzin) to invite people towards the mosques for prayer. Therefore, this function can be fallen into the second category.
Owing to its high elevation, it was preferable to choose a blind Muezzin to prevent his unconscious glance at the gardens of residential houses where the ladies might be without Islamic dress (covering). When the number of mosques increased gradually, and the access to blind Muezzins became difficult, so to find a solution to the problem, a new architectural element called "Goldasteh' was initiated as pyramid structure with a square base located on the top roof of mosques. Although they had higher quality of sound conduction in a limited area, they had less scope of vision and lower elevation.
The minarets were built outside the cities, called "Miel' ( guide post ). They functioned as 'lighthouses of the desert for flocks of travelers moving together as a caravan, who because of the heat of the sun, preferred to move during the nights. So, the minarets with a burning fire on top, just like pharos (beacon) could show the way to the ship of the desert, that is, tall patient camel. In this region, the majority of minarets set up with baked bricks 20 centimeters by 20 centimeters or 40 centimeters by 40 centimeters.
Amongst the existing historical minarets of Iran, the tallest one flanking the gate of the congregational mosque of Yazd (twin) with 57 meters height, in comparison to Sareban in Esfahan, is only 3 meters taller. According to sources in the historical Deylamites Jorjir Mosque, the 11th-century mosque in Esfahan, at present is a 17th century Hakim mosque, had a minaret with 100 meters height destroyed either by the Mongols or Teymour after the conquest of the city. This hints to us about another function of the city minarets as the watch and signal towers for the security of the city against any invasion by enemies.
In Esfahan, a minaret called Ali in the vicinity of the Atiq (Antique) Jam-mosque', is 52 meters high and has 164 spiral steps from the base to the top (two of the steps have a double-height) and weighs about 1,000 tons. With respect to its 5-meter diameter and considerable weight, the natural ground of the area is not able to tolerate such a load in such a limited area regarding the allowable stress of the natural ground. Thus, according to computations, it must have at least an incomplete conical foundation with the following dimensions (considering the minimum allowable stress of the regional soil): a circular base 11meters in diameter, a thickness of 3.5 meters and a circular top of 6 meters in diameter made up of blocks of stone, clay and lime powder. In general, by adding this minimum foundation weight as the substructure to the superstructure (minaret), it gives a minimum total weight of 1700 tons. Hence, this is an important technical point that has been almost neglected by visitors.
In practice, to construct a foundation for a minaret, it was common to carry needed volume of baked bricks to the site, and use the broken pieces in the combination with clay and use lime as the stable mortar to fill up the volume of indication. This procedure can be observed at the site of Ziar Minaret. Although minarets seem as slender and unstable structural elements, in practice they are very durable buildings. For example: Ali Minaret in Esfahan, is more than 9 centuries old, which built simultaneously with the mosque in the 11th century, but 4 centuries later the mosque destroyed and the existing mosque dates back to the 15th century. The main reasons for this longevity can be listed as follows:
1) Due to the existence of a limited area on the top of a minaret in comparison to its magnitude, it is less vulnerable to rainfall. 2) The cylindrical shape of a minaret is an ideal aerodynamic resistant form against wind force. 3) The innate resistance of a minaret against cycles of earthquake loads is achieved by dissipating the frequencies in each turn of loading through the conduction of waves from the base to the top to increase the period of each cycle. In conclusion, the frequencies are reduced by the shaft of minarets, and a considerable reduction in the number of loading and unloading causes less destruction to the structure.
Nowadays, in the theories of structures, it has been proven to confront earthquake loads in the areas with a high probability of occurrence of the earthquake, it is better to design high-rise buildings with sufficient reinforcements based on analysis and regional specifications. In building the minarets, also, the designers made the effort to locate the center of gravity in the lowest possible level of the framework in a conical shape to increase their stability, and to prevent the center of gravity from shifting out of the framework of stability against collapse.
A classic minaret can be physically divided into five parts, respectively from the base to the top, foundation (invisible), shaft, neck, saucer and the crown of the minaret with a maximum elevation on the top.

- Chehel Dokhtaran, the most Prominent Minaret of Isfahan
This minaret is also located in Joubareh (the Jewish quarter) and has a 40 meters height. The etymology of Chehel Doktaran (40 virgins) is obscure, although it was also famed by the name Garland, which referred to J. L. Garland, a Christian missionary of the 19th century who lived near the minaret. It has some Kufic writings on the shaft with baked bricks in an inlaid style. Fortunately, the name of the endower can be read along with the inscribed date 1107 A.D. on six lines in the Arabic language. From this point, it is the only minaret with a certain date endower's name and his intention that still exists on its shaft, over a panel 5 meters higher than its base which states:
"This minaret, as one of the endowments of the chief-commander Abi- ol -Fath-e-Nahuji, was built for winning God's favor and for the satisfaction of the high
est ranking for a donation of its endless reward. May God accept his good deed and help him in its completion."

- Sareban Minaret, the Most Beautiful and the Tallest Minaret of Esfahan
Sareban Minaret is one of the most beautiful minarets of the Seljuk Era, and the tallest one in Esfahan, which is located in Joubareh (the Jewish quarter) 54 meters high and 4.2 meters in diameter. The minaret enjoys seven different parts on its shaft, from the base to the top as follow the first part is with a simple brickwork, the second and the third parts are also with excellent decorative brickwork, the fourth part, the neck (or the first crown) has a combination of bricks and turquoise mosaics on pendentives with inscriptions, the fifth part with brick decoration, the sixth is the saucer (the second crown) and the seventh is the main crown on the top. Professor Pope (the American orientalist) recorded the minaret as being from the 11th century.
Since the minaret is the tallest one in the city, some of the local people regard it as a criterion for the height of the human body, and that is why they compare tall people with this minaret to make fun of or to despise them. At present, this minaret diverted about 8 degrees from the orthogonal direction towards the southeast, which may be related to the probable disorders in the texture of its foundation or to the frequent changes in the level of the aquifer.

- Ali Mosque Minaret, a High Minaret of Esfahan With the Best Proportions And Conditions
The etymology relates to its vicinity to Ali Mosque from the Seljuk era (11th century) which was built 52 meters high, contemporary with the primary mosque (the present mosque by the same name belongs to the Safavid time). The bricked inscriptions on its facade consists of five religious inscriptions with the Kufic style and have been repeated with geometric figures. The minaret has 164 steps with an average height of 31centimeters (two of them have a double-height). On the shaft of the minaret, there are some rectangular openings (apertures) with dimensions of 40 centimeters by 10 centimeters, facing Kiblah for lighting and ventilation. From the base to the top, it is 52 meters high. The diameter of its base is 5 meters and at the level of the saucer and crown it is 4 meters and 2.5 meters, respectively.

- Gar Single Minaret with two Spiral Stairways
About 21.5 kilometers east of Esfahan from Danzdah-e-Khordad' Ave. on the left of the road. The remnants of an abandoned dusty treasure mosque and a minaret of the Seljuk period come into view. The dome chamber has a net dimension of 8 meters by 8 meters in cubic form (the same height). Unfortunately, the dome collapsed and the majority of its supporting structure destroyed, but still more than 50% of its elegant prayer niche with stuccowork survive 3.5 meters wide and 5.5 meters high. Across from it on the upper part of the plasterwork, the builder's name and its date, 1263 A.D., recorded that indicates, it was built about 50 years before Oljeitu Mehrab in ‘Atiq Jam-e-Mosque' of Esfahan, namely, it is the oldest remaining plaster stuccowork in the region of Esfahan. It seems that the inscribed parts annexed later to the mosque. Its Mehrab, like other Mehrabs of that era, has a tolerance of 17 degrees from the precise Mecca direction. On the north of the mosque, the surviving of a minaret with a square base of stone blocks stands out. It is about 18.5 meters high and 5.6 meters wide, estimated to have been primarily about 50 meters high. On the top of its square base, there is an octagon supporting the circular shaft of the minaret. The striking characteristic of this single minaret is two spiral stairways designed and built in an amazing elegant form. Also, there are two orthogonal separate apertures on its shaft, in each direction for one of the stairways. On the shaft of the minaret, the name of its endower inscribed, “Sayed- ol - Roasa ', with a date of 1122 A.D., signifying that Barisan and Chehel Dokhtaran minarets were erected before this minaret.

- Ziar, a Minaret of the Seljuk Era with a Shaft of Five Different Visible Sections
This Minaret is located about 33 kilometers east of Esfahan romanizaleKhordad' Ave, on the left of the road, about 500 meters ahead. Amongst its significant points, is its regular octagonal base (2 meters each side and 5.5 meters high). Its successive sections from bottom upwards are circular, a gradual decrease in diameter (conical) and two other sudden gradual transitions before the top level, where it has a square section large enough for a Muezzin (chanter) to call for prayer. On the shaft of the minaret, at three different levels, exquisite blue mosaics on its brick background employed. Its lower part is extremely attractive and carries the 33rd verse of the Fussilat Chapter (the Distinguished) from the holy Qur'an.
The minaret is totally about 47 meters high settled, somewhat unequally, on the level of the two variable circular sections of its upper part, but still seems stable. Its foundation can be observed vividly at the site because it is situated in the middle of a farm. The diameter of its foundation is 12.3 meters, about 8 meters more than the diameter of the minaret base which is measured at 4.3 meters. Its foundation is a conglomeration of broken pieces of baked bricks, suggestive of an assumption that all the required bricks had been piled up at the site and then the rubble used for the substructure.
On the shaft of the minaret, some rectangular apertures with 20 degree tolerance from the Kiblah direction function as the natural lighting systems. On the western part of it, at the elevation of six meters, the surviving of its identity tablet (2 meters by 2 meters), completely defaced refers to its approximate date of construction that ranges between 1155-1269 A.D.

- Rahravan Minaret The Closest Single Minaret outside Esfahan
Passing through Jey Ave. towards Khorasgan. 8 kilometer norasgan , 8 kilometers east of Isfahan from Ahmad Abad Circle, in the middle of a village named Rahravan (locally pronounced as Rarun), one faces another minaret of the action the bottom measures 3.5 meters by 3.5 meters and 60 centimeter high, with a gradual change in the section, sizes of 3 meters by 3 meters, (from the viewpoint of having the square base, it is similar to Gaar minaret), and 1.2 meters higher than the base, converts into a circular one 3 meters in diameter. On its shaft, there are three charming inscriptions of turquoise blue mosaics with Kufic masonry (the letters are connected to one another at a 90 degree angle) style, in three different levels with a considerable distance from one another, distinguishable from the other Seljuk minarets. On its neck, there is a sudden transition into a smaller circular section, on which another line of inscription, on blue mosaics with Sols Style affirming, the Islamic faith, “There is no God except Allah” and “Mohammad is the messenger of Allah” with a lighter and more vivid color, than the above mentioned three lines on the lower levels.
This part of the minaret is about 7 degrees diverted from the orthogonal direction. On the shaft, there are six openings five of them have 15 degrees tolerance facing the Kiblah. It is 42 meters high, with an entrance at the level of 2.2 meters from the bottom, with 1 meter by 1.5 meters dimensions, covered by bricks and plaster. The thickness of the shaft at the level of the crown is 20 centimeters. The bricks have two different sizes, the first one is 20 centimeters by 20 centimeters and the second is 40 centimeters by 40 centimeters. At the level of 7 meters from the base, on the shaft just opposite direction of the Kiblah, there is a rectangular panel, 5 centimeters deep, which probably carried some inscriptions about the endower and its date with plaster gypsum or mosaics that were faded gradually.
The minaret is in the middle of an open area surrounded by the houses, and it does not seem that there was any mosque in its neighborhood. Probably, it was a single minaret as a guiding light for the nightly passage of caravans around Esfahan, and that is why it is, etymologically, called Rahravan wayfarers), Mr. Smith (20th century), the archeologist estimated its date as 1179_1289 AD

-Dar- ol -Ziafeh' The Twin Minarets with the Nicest Designs of the Mozaffarid Era
Dar- ol -Ziafeh' twin minarets are the only remnants of the magnificent entrance gate of the historical, royal caravanserai of the "Ale-Mozaffar period. In reality, the style of their decorative tile work is very beautiful and different. They are about 38 meters high, and the style of their restoration on the crown is not harmonious with its shaft, and it is clear that the crowns are not original.

- Dardasht Twin Minarets and Sultan Bakht Agha Two Inseparable Neighbors since 7 Centuries ago
From "Sabz-e-Maydan' Circle towards 'Chahar Bagh-e- Paien ' on the northern side and after 200-meter walking, we enter the main bazaar, then after another 150 meters, we turn left into an alley and 100 meters farther, we arrive at 'Hammam-e-Sheikh', where 250-meter interval exists to destination . The site is in the middle of Dardasht, an old famous quarter of Isfahan. The key to the site kept by an old man named Haj Ali living around there.
After opening the original heavy wooden door, one may pass through the narrow portal (13 meters high and 3.7 meters wide), flanking by twin minarets each one 8 meters high from the top of the portal. The decorative minarets are very similar to "Bagh-e- Ghoosh -Khaneh', a single minaret of the same age. For example, on their shaft, there is a wide dark blue spiral tile work with mystical meanings. Unfortunately, nothing remained of the tile work on the 50-centimeter band of the portal. By guess, the entrance with twin minarets was either the portal of a school or a caravanserai resembling Darroziaffeh portal of the same age. In the dome chamber, Sultan Bakht Agha, an educated charming lady and Sultan Mahmoud Ale-Mozaffar's wife (the king of Iran) buried The Queen was killed by her husband's volition. Below the dome, on a tombstone made of one block of homogenous pale-reddish stone with a carved cypress as well as the inscribed date of 1367 A.D., which was ordered to build by her during her lifetime as if she herself knew her fate!
The dimensions of the dome chamber are 5.3 meters by 5.3 meters and 6.5 meters high. The thickness of its walls measures 1.9 meters and the dome is 18.5 meters high. One of its unique specifications is the existence of geometric figures given a very different view of the dome. By using the inlaid mosaics on the background of the bricked dome, especially on the neck of it, there are 14 pentagons with 14 other similar smaller pentagons inside each of them. Between the peaks of each pair, square shape and another similar square with a larger size exists are available from peak to peak of the larger pentagon. Thus with 64 geometric figures, the surface of the dome is classified into four different levels displaying an exquisite optical attraction suggestive of its mystical meanings. This style of ornamentation has donated such glory and purity to the dome that one can feel it without being able to describe it.

- Bagh-e-Qosh Khaneh: One of the Most Elegant and Fully Decorated Minarets from the End of the Ilkhanid Era.
This minaret is located on an octagonal base (0.8 meters high) which bears a circular minaret of 2.2 meters diameter on the top. There are remnants of an old irregular wall (6 meters) of the old mosque which gives a total height of 38 meters.
From the point of tile work and decoration, this minaret as a single minaret is one of the richest and most beautiful ones in Esfahan. Its appellation relates to its proximity to an old garden of the Safavid era which was used for breeding birds of prey. The openings on its shaft are precisely facing the east. On the elevation of the 24 meters at the neck of the minaret, we can find very beautiful pendentives embellished by inlaid mosaics and on the base of its crown the same style can be found with a smaller size and the same quality. On the shaft of the minaret from the base, there is dark blue spiral tile work with enough space which allows inscription of some holy prayers along with turquoise tiles.
Ozhan Flandin, the famous 19th-century traveler, described it as a small mosque, but a real jewel in Iran and drew a sketch which shows that there were two other small minarets at the portal of its mosque near the single existing minaret. The minaret is being restored (2003), so there is a scaffolding set up around it.


Jameh Mosque of Isfahan, Iran

On the blue, turquoise mosaics of the mosque’s entrance, a poem in Arabic written which means: what do you feel after visiting this mosque, do you feel like a bird in the cage or like a fish in the water, a true believer resembling a fish in the water and a hypocrite look likes a bird in the cage. Before entering the mosque just remind this poem.

Jameh Mosque of Isfahan, Iran

Jame mosque of Isfahan Finding the mosque among the whole Bazaar is a little bit difficult. As it is located in the oldest parts of Isfahan. Date back to more than 3000 years ago which primitive inhabitants because of water and mostly permanent Zayandeh Rood (literally means life-giving river) absorbed here. Around 2500 years ago when Cyrus attacked Babylon and saved the lives of Jews people, a good number of them migrated to this part of Iran and shaped some villages, it was the early Isfahan which was consist of 6 villages. As Jews for their religious ceremonies needed a temple.

They built a big one in this place which right now is the mosque. In the most important part of the mosque that is toward the southwest (Mecca) there is tall brick dome named Nezam, on beneath you’ll see 3 archaeological layers, the first old layer is the remains of Jews Temple which mentioned, the second one is remains of Zoroastrian temple and the recent is the mosque. There is not a clear time of destroying and building of these temples but a common belief says there is holy and positive energy in the places where people pray the God and also the new religions needs legitimacy and followers, consequently for these reasons all of these sacred places built in replace of each other.

About the architecture – Jameh Mosque of Isfahan

Go back through the history of the mosque, it’s the first or the second old mosque in Iran. It is the second oldest because it built around 776 A.C, after Fahraj Jame mosque in Kerman province, but maybe the first as it didn’t start officially in its own time. It was built 156 years after announcing Islam in Saudi Arabia, it shows all of these years lasted till people come to this idea of building a Jame mosque.

As it’s crystal clear Jame mosque (congregational mosques) is a place for gathering people in Friday for Friday pray which is the most important public pray for Muslims, as Fridays are off days in Muslim countries, people gather together in the biggest mosque of the city under the leadership of high ranked clergy of each city.

Other attractions near by Jameh Mosque Isfahan

Jame mosques are like Amphitheaters in Greece, these places are the most important part of cities, new information about everything could be found there. All of the facilities in a city are gathered around this place like Grand Bazaar, Caravansaries (old fashioned hotels) restaurants, bathhouses, schools, theological schools, etc. Jame mosques also are places for gathering people. In the time of wars, a Jame mosque turns to a place for gathering soldiers, in an epidemic disease to a hospital, in time of shortage a place for distributing foods among people and etc.

As the role of Jame mosque cleared and the history of this mosque presented, it’s obvious the mosque is a very good example of 1200 years of Iranian Islamic architecture which has roots in pre-Islamic art and architecture. One may find many designs of pre-Islamic art combined with Islamic.

Although there have not existed any concept of Islamic art. As Saudi Arabia was a desert and shape of houses there was just like a simple four wall room, the time Islam came to Iran, Iranian took a new religion, digested it with their own art and architecture then presented a new type of art. As you can see this new art of Iranian that is transferred to the type of domes (egg shape dome), different types of vaults, using complicated design of brickwork and etc. And also it was one of the reasons this mosque among the other sites in Isfahan registered as an Iran UNESCO world heritage site.

Jameh Mosque Isfahan – UNESCO listing

As Isfahan chose as capital city three times in its history, one may find the most artistic design here, as the Jame mosque is a place to present the power of high ranked clergy of the city, it might build in its glorious way. This old part of Isfahan contains other places like the tallest minaret in Isfahan, Haroun Velayat (the oldest brother of eight Imam of Shia), and Imam Ali square. People who like to surf this tremendous part of Isfahan may glad to stay at Howzak House Boutique hostel, Isfahan Boutique hotel, and Panj Dari hostel.

Where to stay near by Jameh Mosque

As Isfahan chose as capital city three times in its history, one may find the most artistic design here, as the Jame mosque is a

How to get to Jameh Mosque of Isfahan

By a private car … with taxi it costs

5 USD from all around the Isfahan to Jameh Mosque of Isfahan. There is no metro station nearby.


#7 What is the best season to travel to Isfahan Iran?

Don’t forget to take your moisturizer with you! Because the dominant climate of Isfahan Iran is temperate and very dry.

Spring: In the first two months of the spring season is decent.

Summer: Esfahan has hot and dry summers maybe not the best choice to travel to.

Fall: it’s a decent season but as we get closer to the end of the season it gets colder.

Winter: it rains and sometimes it starts to snow. Take all your warm clothes.

40 pillars Palace (Chehel Sotoun)


3- Palaces – Isfahan Tourist Attractions

The palaces of Isfahan are unique historical attractions of Iran. These tourist attractions are located in the central part of Isfahan city. Some of the famous palaces are as follows:

– Ālī Qāpū Palace (The Royal Palace)

Ālī Qāpū Palace (Ali Qapu Palace) is another Isfahan tourist attractions. This monument belongs to the Safavid period. This palace stands At the west of Imam Square (Naghsh-e Jahan), in front of the Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque.


Watch the video: Isfahan - Meczet Alego - Ali Mosque - Ali Minaret - مناره علی - Iran (January 2022).