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Gewehr 41 semi-automatic rifle


Gewehr 41 semi-automatic rifle

The Gewehr 41 (G41) was an early semi-automatic rifle developed in Germany during the Second World War.


Gewehr 41

Gewehr 41(M) - click to enlarge. You will probably notice the bolt handle in that photo, and how it looks remarkably like the handle of a K98 or other bolt action rifle. This was another feature from Mauser to comply with the HWaA's old-world requirements Gewehr 41 (Mauser version) semi-automatic rifleThe Gewehr 41 rifles, commonly known as the G41(W) or G41(M), were semi-automatic rifles used by Nazi Germany during World War II.. Background [edit | edit source]. By 1940, it became apparent that some form of a semi-automatic rifle, with a higher rate of fire than existing bolt-action rifle models, was necessary to improve the infantry's combat.

Gewehr 41 - Wikiwan

  • GEWEHR 41 WW II German Semi Automatic Rifle Licensed Dealer, Gunsmith, Manufacturer and NFA Weapons We are restoring history one weapon at a time Anti Gun CEO and companys Every attempt to make war easy and safe will result in humiliation and disaster. William Tecumseh Sherman: Brand New Vet Section We build and restore weapons for Vets
  • The German military establishment during WWII has a reputation for innovation and excellence, which is pretty well deserved. But even they produced some real..
  • Het Gewehr 43, later hernoemd naar Karabiner 43 (G43/K43), was een wapen van de Duitse Wehrmacht in de Tweede Wereldoorlog.Dit werd als verbeterde versie van het weinig succesvolle Gewehr 41 ontwikkeld, om nog maar eens te trachten de Karabiner 98k te vervangen als standaard infanteriewapen, omdat de Wehrmacht aan het oostfront overtroefd werd door de Sovjet-Russische semiautomatische geweren.
  • The Gewehr 41 would later be developed into the more famous Gewehr 43 rifle. Production figures of the Gewehr 41(W) are disputed, with various sources putting production figures between 40,000 to 145,000 units on the other hand, 6,673 Gewehr 41(M)s were produced, with 1,673 returned to the factory as they were deemed unusable
  • The Gewehr41 (German for: rifle 41), commonly known as the G41(W) or G41(M), denoting the manufacturer (Walther or Mauser), is a battle rifle manufactured and used by Nazi Germany during World War II.It was largely superseded by the Gewehr 43, which incorporated a more reliable method of operation.. Background. By 1940, it became apparent that some form of a semi-automatic rifle with a higher.

Gewehr 41(M) - Forgotten Weapon

  1. The Gewehr 41 and G/K43 German Semi Automatic Rifles Gewehr41.com is a licensed FFL dealer. We do buy, trade, sell, repair and restore WW2 Weapons. Specializing in G41 and G-K43's : Why buy our rifles? We are very familiar with these rifles, and each one gets tested thoroughly before you purchase them
  2. Gewehr 41: Cirino, Zheng: Amazon.nl Selecteer uw cookievoorkeuren We gebruiken cookies en vergelijkbare tools om uw winkelervaring te verbeteren, onze services aan te bieden, te begrijpen hoe klanten onze services gebruiken zodat we verbeteringen kunnen aanbrengen, en om advertenties weer te geven
  3. 6 relaties: Gewehr 43, Lijst van wapens uit de Tweede Wereldoorlog, Red Orchestra 2: Heroes of Stalingrad, Red Orchestra: Ostfront 41-45, Tokarev SVT-40, Walther (wapenfabrikant). Gewehr 43. Gewehr 43 Het Gewehr 43, later hernoemd naar Karabiner 43 (G43/K43), was een wapen van de Duitse Wehrmacht in de Tweede Wereldoorlog

Gewehr 41 Military Wiki Fando

  1. Gewehr 41. In 1940 the Germany Army, currently equipped with bolt-action weapons so far as rifles and carbines were concerned, issued a requirement for a semi-automatic (or self-loading) rifle to succeeded the various Mauser weapons of the Gewehr 98 series
  2. Gewehr 41 en Nazi-Duitsland · Bekijk meer » Oostfront (Tweede Wereldoorlog) Het oostfront was tijdens de Tweede Wereldoorlog de naam voor het toneel van oorlogshandelingen in Centraal- en Oost-Europa, vanaf 22 juni 1941 tot 9 mei 1945. Nieuw. Gewehr 41 en Oostfront (Tweede Wereldoorlog) · Bekijk meer » Tweede Wereldoorlo
  3. Het Gewehr 41(W) werd door twee fabrieken geproduceerd, namelijk de Waltherfabriek in Zella-Mehlis en in de Berlin-Lübecker Maschinenfabrik. De Walthervuurwapens droegen de geheime fabriekscode (ac) en WaA359 afnamestempels. De geweren zijn tegenwoordig betrekkelijk schaars en vrij waardevol voor verzamelaars
  4. The Gewehr 41 or G41 (M) or (W) (depending whether the manufacturer was Walther or Mauser) was a semi automatic, gas-operated rifle that was used by Germany during World War II. 1 Description 2 Variants 3 History 4 References The G41 fired the 7.92x57 mm Mauser round from a ten round fixed magazine. It suffered from mechanical failures and proved to be unreliable.The total weight of the system.
  5. The Gewehr 43 or Karabiner 43 (abbreviated G43, K43, Gew 43, Kar 43) is a 7.92×57mm Mauser caliber semi-automatic rifle developed by Germany during World War II.The design was based on that of the earlier G41(W), but incorporated an improved short-stroke piston gas system similar to that of the Soviet Tokarev SVT-40.It was manufactured using innovative mass-production techniques

The Gewehr 41 (German for Rifle 1941) is a weapon featured in Post Scriptum. Shortly after the start of the Second World War, it became apparent that the German army needed a semi-automatic rifle that had a higher fire rate than existing bolt-action rifles, such as the Karabiner 98 Kurz, to improve the combat efficiency of infantry troops. This prompted the German Army to issue a specification. Gewehr 41 (Mauser version) semi-automatic rifle. The Gewehr 41 (German for: rifle 41), commonly known as the G41(W) or G41(M), is a semi-automatic rifle manufactured and used by Nazi Germany during World War II The Gewehr 41 (or Gew 41 or G41) series semi-automatic rifle appeared in relatively few numbers for the German Army during World War 2 (1939-1945). Up to this point in the war, the Wehrmacht relied largely on infantry issued with the standard Mauser-based bolt-action service rifles of previous decades Gewehr 41 is beschikbaar in 14 andere talen. Terug naar Gewehr 41. Talen. Deutsch eesti English español français magyar norsk bokmål polski Türkçe češtin

GEWEHR 41 semi automatic rifle G4

Gewehr 41: | | | |Gewehr 41| | | | | World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the most definitive. The Gewehr 41 was produced during the Second World War in response to a German Army requirement for a self-loading rifle. The Army's procurement office laid down strict guidelines to govern the design of such a rifle. Its action was not to be cycled by gas tapped from the barrel. Gewehr 41 (Walther) Video. June 27, 2012 Ian McCollum Semiauto Rifles 16. The German military establishment during WWII has a reputation for innovation and excellence, which is pretty well deserved. But even they produced some real goose eggs, and the Gewehr 41 is one of them Gewehr 41(W) Forgotten Weapons. The German military establishment during WWII had a reputation for innovation and excellence, which is pretty well deserved. But even they produced some real goose eggs, and the Gewehr 41 is one of them

Gewehr 41. In 1940 Mauser was invited to take place in a competition to re-equip the German army with a semi-automatic rifle, the Gewehr 41. The requirements specified that the design should not drill holes into the barrel, thereby requiring mechanisms that proved unreliable Use Gewehr 41 [FREE] and thousands of other assets to build an immersive game or experience. Select from a wide range of models, decals, meshes, plugins, or audio that help bring your imagination into reality

Gewehr 41 (Walther) - YouTub

Gezocht: G41/ Gewehr 41 onklaar - serieus bod - demil Prijs: Nader overeen te komen. 258 keer bekeken • Status: Actief. Staat: Gebruikt Stuur me een berichtje als u er één heeft. Uiteraard een serieus bod naar waarde. Contact-informatie. The Gewehr 43 or Karabiner 43 was a semi-automactic rifle made in Nazi Germany based on the Gewehr 41 and the soviet Tokarev SVT-40 Before the start of the World War II, German army had little interest in self-loafing rifles. Their tactical doctrine centered around infantry squad with MG-34 universal machine gun as primary source of firepower, supported by the riflemen with Karabiner 98K bolt. The Gewehr 43 (Gew 43) became the next evolution of the Walther Gew 41(W) of 1941 - a self-loading, semi-automatic rifle that failed to see require production numbers to make a proper wartime impression

The Gewehr 43 is a 7.92×57mm Mauser caliber semi-automatic rifle developed by Nazi Germany during World War II. It was a modification of the G41(W) using an improved gas system similar to that of the Soviet SVT-40. 1 History 2 Gewehr 43 / Karabiner 43 3 Other Details 4 References 5 External links Germany's quest for a semi-automatic infantry rifle resulted in two designs - the G41(M) and G41. The Gewehr 41(M) (abbreviated as Gew 41(M) or G 41(M)) is a German self-loading rifle developed for the Wehrmacht. It competed against the Gewehr 41(W), and while this model adhered closer to the original requirements, the Walther model was chosen for service. Gewehr 41(M) Mauser model. Gewehr.. The Gewehr 41 was Germany's first attempt at a mass produced semi automatic Full Powered Rifle, which utilized the unique Bang system to achieve self loading. It was eventually found to be too unreliable and was replaced by the Gewehr 43 (in game, there is little difference between the two, only slightly in recoil patterns and the fact that G43 gets a unique scope). It is a rare spawn on the. Het Gewehr 43, later hernoemd naar Karabiner 43 , was een wapen van de Duitse Wehrmacht in de Tweede Wereldoorlog. Dit werd als verbeterde versie van het weinig succesvolle Gewehr 41 ontwikkeld, om nog maar eens te trachten de Karabiner 98k te vervangen als standaard infanteriewapen, omdat de Wehrmacht aan het oostfront overtroefd werd door de Sovjet-Russische semiautomatische geweren Tokarev.

Script error: No such module Message box. The Gewehr 41 rifles, commonly known as the G41(W) or G41(M), were semi-automatic rifles used by Nazi Germany during World War II. By 1940, it became apparent that some form of a semi-automatic rifle, with a higher rate of fire than existing bolt-action rifle models, was necessary to improve the infantry's combat efficiency. The Wehrmacht issued a. This page was last edited on 16 November 2020, at 07:53. Files are available under licenses specified on their description page. All structured data from the file and property namespaces is available under the Creative Commons CC0 License all unstructured text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License additional terms may apply The Gewehr 41 (M) failed, with only 6,673 produced, whilst the G 41 (W) was more successful, in part due to ignoring the requirement for optional bolt-action operation. However, both designs suffered from gas system fouling problems, the result of an overly complex bang muzzle trap system prone to excessive corrosion as a result of the salts in the ammunition primers as well as carbon fouling

Gewehr 41 squad is a 5-stared unit affiliated with Vanguard Division. When the Karabiner 98k was unable to contend with the firepower of the Soviet's SVT-40 on the Eastern Front. Walther weapons manufacturer then mass-produced the Gewehr 41 semi-automatic. Gewehr 41 on Wikipedi Gewehr 41 (Walther) - 3D model by minod (@minod) [13b5185] Explore Buy 3D models. For business. Cancel. 0. Login Sign Up Upload. 3D. Navigation basics All controls Orbit around. Left click + drag or One finger drag (touch) Zoom. Double click on model or scroll anywhere or Pinch (touch. Wij willen hier een beschrijving geven, maar de site die u nu bekijkt staat dit niet toe Use [Warbound] Gewehr 41 and thousands of other assets to build an immersive game or experience. Select from a wide range of models, decals, meshes, plugins, or audio that help bring your imagination into reality Another Walther weapon, the Gewehr 41, the model before the notable Gewehr 43. Model is from Red Orchestra 2. I actually used the firing sounds this model is supposed to use, and overall, it did come out exquisite, despite the bad animations, as it needs to be loaded by a stripper clip

Gewehr 43 - Wikipedi

  1. The Linked Data Service provides access to commonly found standards and vocabularies promulgated by the Library of Congress. This includes data values and the controlled vocabularies that house them. Datasets available include LCSH, BIBFRAME, LC Name Authorities, LC Classification, MARC codes, PREMIS vocabularies, ISO language codes, and more
  2. Gewehr 41 3D asset gun gewehr gewehr41, available formats OBJ, FBX, BLEND, DAE, ready for 3D animation and other 3D project
  3. or easter egg. It has similar stats to the Gewehr 43 and it cannot be pack-a-punched
  4. Gewehr 41 and Berlin-Lübecker Maschinenfabrik · See more » British Army during the Second World War. The British Army was, in 1939, a volunteer army, that introduced limited conscription in early 1939, and full conscription shortly after the declaration of war with Germany. New. Gewehr 41 and British Army during the Second World War · See.
  5. The Gewehr 41 rifle, commonly known as the G41(W) or G41(M), is a semi-automatic rifle manufactured and used by Nazi Germany during World War II
  6. They fielded the Gewehr 41 series of which fewer than 150,000 were built, and the Gewehr 43/Karabiner 43 series of which 402,713 were built. MG 42 - Wikipedia The design was based on that of the earlier G41(W), but incorporating an improved short-stroke piston gas system similar to that of the Soviet Tokarev SVT-40, and it incorporated innovative mass-production techniques
  7. The Gewehr 41 rifles, commonly known as the G41(W) or G41(M), were semi-automatic rifles used by Nazi Germany during World War II. The design was based on that of the earlier G41(W), but incorporating an improved short-stroke piston gas system similar to that of the Soviet Tokarev SVT-40, and it incorporated innovative mass-production techniques

Gewehr 41 Gun Wiki Fando

  • Definitions of Gewehr_41, synonyms, antonyms, derivatives of Gewehr_41, analogical dictionary of Gewehr_41 (English
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  • How do you say Gewehr 41(W)? Listen to the audio pronunciation of Gewehr 41(W) on pronouncekiw
  • Mauser Gewehr 41 (M) Manual Last week, we posted a video on the Gewehr 41(W), which was the first really mass produced German self-loading combat rifle.Well, when the Heereswaffenamt (German ordnance department) requested designs for what would become the G41, both Mauser and Walther submitted samples
  • The Gewehr 41 (G41) was the first attempt by the German Wehrmacht to produce a semi-automatic rifle.Previous rifles used were the Karabiner 98 and the Gewehr 98 - Both bolt action rifles, and it was the general concensus that a self-loading rifle was needed to increase the rate of fire and efficiency of the German rifleman. Two main competitors tried to obtain the contract offered by the.
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  • Gewehr G + K 43 Gewehr G/41(W) Gewehr G41(M) Hembrug Gewehr M/1895 und Karabiner Husquarna Pistole M40 Kal. 9mm Para Krag Jörgensen Gewehr M/1894 (Norwegen) Krag Jörgensen M/1889 + Karabiner (Dänemark) Läufe für Pistolen Ljungmann AG 42 B MAB Modell D Pistole MAS 1936 Mauser 98 und 98 K Mauser C96 Mauser M/1896 + M/38 (Schweden.

Gewehr 41 - это. Что такое Gewehr 41? Gewehr 41 The Gewehr 33/40, also simply known as the G33/40, was a bolt-action rifle, sometimes considered a carbine, used exclusively by Germany's elite mountain troops, the Gebirgsjäger.1 The Gewehr 33/40 was a rotating bolt-action rifle based heavily on the Czech vz.33 rifle, itself inspired by the famous Gewehr 98.1 The rifle was rather short at only one meter long. Like the Karabiner 98k, the. The Gewehr 43 is a 7.92×57mm Mauser caliber semi-automatic rifle developed by Nazi Germany during World War II. It was a modification of the G41(W) using an improved gas system similar to that of the Soviet SVT-40. 1 History 2 Gewehr 43 / Karabiner 43 3 Other Details 4 References 5 External links Germany's quest for a semi-automatic infantry rifle resulted in two designs - the G41(M) and G41. In this conversation. Verified account Protected Tweets @ Suggested user Gewehr 41(W) and Gewehr 43 There was in the German army an overall quality control department that was responsible for devising ways to make the German armed forces more efficient. By 1940, it became apparent to this section that some form of a self-loading rifle with a higher rate of fire was needed to improve the German infantry's combat efficiency


Walther Gewehr 41 (G41 / Gew 41)

Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 06/18/2018 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

The Gewehr 41 (or "Gew 41" or "G41") series semi-automatic rifle appeared in relatively few numbers for the German Army during World War 2 (1939-1945). Up to this point in the war, the Wehrmacht relied largely on infantry issued with the standard Mauser-based bolt-action service rifles of previous decades. While utterly reliable and highly proven in combat, these weapons gave a slow rate-of-fire when compared to self-loading types and further limited by their small magazines. The German Empire attempted to introduce automatic weapons into its army ranks during World War 1 but these were generally limited projects with few seeing considerable action. With the new World War in Europe, a new arms program was enacted to deliver a capable, self-loading, semi-automatic service rifle to German infantry elements.

In 1941, the work ultimately yielded the "Gewehr 41" with two prototype versions being delivered by the long-standing firearms firms of Mauser and Walther. As such, each form varied slightly in their assigned designations - the Mauser product was known as "Gew 41(M)" and the Walther product was known as "Gew 41(W)". One of the interesting requirements pressed upon the companies was to include a bolt-action mechanism as a fail-safe should the automatic loading action fail in service. The other requirements specified that no moving parts be set along the surfaces of the gun and no holes were to be bored into the barrel for the purpose of "tapping" the required gasses for the loading operation. Therefore a completely new operating system was developed known - rather amusingly - as the "Bang" mechanism, though this name coming from the operation's Danish designer, Soren H. Bang. After some evaluation, the Mauser design was removed from contention with the more stable Walther rifle - its designers effectively ignoring the "moving parts" and "bolt-action" requirements - being accepted into German Army service. Production of the rifle stemmed from Berlin-Luebecker Maschinenfabrik of Lubeck and the Carl Walther Waffenfabrik AG facility at Zella-Mehlis in Germany.

The Gew 41(W) appeared not unlike the bolt-action rifles of the time with the stock, receiver and fore-end all represented through a wooden body. The barrel was nested within the wood frame and all of the critical internal components were set in the aft portion of the receiver. The stock contoured finely into an ergonomic integrated pistol grip with the curved trigger set within an oblong ring. The internal (non-detachable) 10-round box magazine was set ahead of the trigger group and fed from the topside of the receiver by ammunition "clips". A flip-up type sight found along the middle of the receiver allowed for some level of accurized fire and was complemented by a forward post sight above the muzzle. Internally, the weapon was gas-operated - trapping its gas around the muzzle to drive a piston - with its unique locking bolt system required to complete the semi-automatic action. Weight was listed at 10.87lb (4.9kg) and overall length was 44.8 inches (1,140mm) with the barrel measuring 21.5 inches (546mm) long.

Since the weapon featured a 10-round integral, non-removable magazine for reloading purposes, the magazine relied on two 5-round "stripper clips" of 7.92x57mm Mauser cartridges - the same ammunition, and clips, as found in the standard service Mauser Karabiner 98K bolt-action rifle of the German Army. While the self-loading prospect of the rifle was the key to its ultimate success or failure, the actual reloading of the two individual stripper clips in the heat of battle left something to be desired. Rate-of-fire from a trained soldier could reach between 20- and 30-rounds-per-minute. Muzzle velocity was rated at 2,328 feet-per-second with an effective range of about 400 meters.

However, once in practice, the Gew 41 proved limiting in several key respects. Chief of all, the Gew 41(W) proved expensive to mass-produce, a common failing of many early-war weapons. The gas system was overly complicated and prone to fouling and the weapon suffered from an inherent imbalance in her design making it noticeably heavy at the muzzle. As was the case with complicated guns, the internal components required much attention in the field in terms of general maintenance when combating the effects of battlefield dust, dirt, and debris along with general wear and tear. Reloading was tedious and potentially life-threatening to the operator.

With these deficiencies in mind, only between 6,600 and 8,000 Gew 41 rifles were ultimately delivered for service. Despite this, the Gew 41 series remained, for a time, the only self-loading rifle available to German troops. The line was eventually superseded by the similar - though much improved - Gewehr 43 (Gew 43) which followed the Gew 41 into service during 1943. The Gew 43 became a more "production friendly" model, featured a detachable box magazine, and could mount a scope to make for a deadly sniper system. However, the Gew 43 was only made possible after the Germans came across captured examples of Soviet Tokarev automatic rifles and their gas-operated system - which tapped its gasses from the barrel the Tokarev gas system was more-or-less outright copied for the German Gew 43.

Regardless, the Gew 41 did make it to at least the Eastern Front following the German invasion of the Soviet Union though these weapons were often found in the hands of "special forces" elements within the Wermacht and were not standard issue among general infantry.


Gewehr 41 semi-automatic rifle - History

The Soldier above left is in each of the top 3 photos. His grandson provided me these three photos taken in Greece 1943. He did survive the war but lost his right arm to a sniper in Thessonoliki. He was carrying the G41 and saw something shiny on the ground bent over and used his right arm to hold back the G41 and where his head was, was now his elbow and that is where the sniper got him. The rest of the unit was subsequently sent to defend Belgrade against the Russians and were wiped out. It was a Himmelsfahrt Einheit comprised of Political prisoners. The Commander stepped on a mine and lost his leg and was the only other to survive.

While in the Field hospital in 1945, he was in Schleswig Holstein and when the British troops came into the hospital, he stood up and sang God save the Queen. He was the only patient to get rum that night. The Brits loved him.

His name was Franz Berg and was from Hamburg and a Schuetze until the very end. Fascinating guy, very Prussian and taught me how to tell time, chess and to collect things. I have his wound badge in silver and his dog tag as well. Being very Prussian, he was also the reason that my mom left Germany and emigrated to the US to California. And the rest is history!


Variants

Although the Gewehr 41 didn't really have any variants besides its successor the Gewehr 43, the Gewehr 41 was primarily made by two manufacturers. These manufacturers, Walther and Mauser, made their rifles very similarly, but they had some key differences, the most obvious being that the Mauser design failed but this was because it followed the design regulations too closely making the weapons very unreliable. ΐ] As mentioned above, the Walther designed rifle simply ignored most of the regulations. Only about 6,600 (M) models were made before production ended. In total, up to 100,000 Gewehr 41 rifles were produced.


Contents

The first design of a recoil-operated semi-automatic rifle is attributed to Ferdinand Mannlicher, who unveiled the design in 1885 based on work begun in 1883. [1] [2] Other non-gas operated semi-automatic models were the Model 85 and Mannlicher Models 91, 93 and 95 rifles. [3] The designs were deeply flawed and never made past the conceptual/prototype stage due to issues inherent to the black powder used in their cartridges (based around the Austrian 11×58mmR M/77), such as insufficient velocity and excessive fouling automatic firearms would only become feasible after smokeless powder became widespread. Mannlicher's designs were, nonetheless, the forerunner of automatic rifles and served as a base for a number of future weapons, such as Browning machine guns (M1917, M1919 and M2) [4] and the Lewis gun. [5] Furthermore, from the early 1890s up until his death in 1904, Mannlicher produced smokeless powder versions of his guns. [6]

Blowback semi-automatic Edit

In 1903 and 1905, the Winchester Repeating Arms Company introduced the first low-power blowback (non-gas operated) semi-automatic rimfire and centerfire rifles. The Winchester Model 1903 and Winchester Model 1905 operated on the principle of blowback to function semi-automatically. Designed by T.C. Johnson, the Model 1903 achieved commercial success and continued to be manufactured until 1932, when the Winchester Model 63 replaced it.

By the early 20th century, several manufacturers had introduced semi-automatic .22 rifles, including Winchester, Remington, Fabrique Nationale, and Savage Arms, all using the direct blowback system of operation. Winchester introduced a .351 Winchester Self-Loading semi-automatic rifle, the Model 1907, as an upgrade to the Model 1905, utilizing a blowback system of operation, offering more power than its .22 counterpart. Both the Model 1905 and Model 1907 saw limited military and police use.

Early semi-automatic rifles Edit

In 1906, Remington Arms introduced the "Remington Auto-loading Repeating Rifle". Remington advertised this rifle, renamed the "Model 8" in 1911, as a sporting rifle. It was sold in Europe by FN Herstal as the "FN Browning 1900". [7] This is a locked-breech, long recoil action designed by John Browning. The rifle was offered in .25, .30, .32, and .35 caliber models, and gained popularity among civilians as well as some law enforcement officials who appreciated the combination of a semi-automatic action and relatively powerful rifle cartridges. In 1936 the Model 81 superseded the Model 8, and was offered in .300 Savage as well as the original Remington calibers.

In 1908, General Manuel Mondragón patented the world's first gas-operated semi-automatic rifle, the Mondragón rifle, designated the M1908. The rifle was used by Mexican forces in the Mexican Revolution, making Mexico the first nation to use a semi-automatic rifle in battle, in 1911.

Shortly after the Mondragón rifle was produced, France had its own semi-automatic rifle, the Fusil Automatique Modele 1917. This is a locked breech, gas-operated action which is similar in its mechanical principles to the subsequent American M1 Garand. The M1917 was fielded during the latter stages of World War I, [8] where it did not receive a favorable reception among troops. However, its shortened and improved version, the Model 1918, gave complete satisfaction during the Moroccan Rif War from 1920 to 1926. Still, the bolt-action Lebel Model 1886 rifle remained the standard French infantry rifle until replaced in 1936 by the MAS-36, also a bolt action, despite the various semi-automatic rifles designed between 1918 and 1935.

Other nations experimented with self-loading rifles during the interwar period, including the United Kingdom, which had intended to replace the bolt-action Lee–Enfield with a self-loading rifle, but this plan had to be discarded when the Second World War became imminent, shifting its emphasis to speeding up re-armament with existing weapons.

Gas-operated rifles Edit

In 1937, the American M1 Garand was historically significant as it was the first semi automatic service rifle. The gas-operated M1 Garand was developed by Canadian-born John Garand for the U.S. government at the Springfield Armory in Springfield, Massachusetts. After years of research and testing, the first production model of the M1 Garand was unveiled in 1937. During World War II, the M1 Garand gave American infantrymen an advantage over their opponents, most of whom were issued slower firing bolt-action rifles. [9] General George S. Patton described the M1 Garand as "the greatest battle implement ever devised." [10]

The Soviet AVS-36, SVT-38, and SVT-40, as well as the German Gewehr 43, were semi-automatic gas-operated rifles issued during World War II in relatively small numbers. In practice, they did not replace the bolt-action rifle as a standard infantry weapon of their respective nations - Germany produced 402,000 Gewehr 43 rifles, [11] and over 14,000,000 of the Kar98k. [12]

Another gas-operated semi-automatic rifle developed toward the end of World War II was the SKS. Designed by Sergei Gavrilovich Simonov in 1945, it came equipped with a bayonet and could be loaded with ten rounds, using a stripper clip. It was the first widely issued rifle to use the 7.62×39mm cartridge, [13] and the SKS, along with its Chinese copy, the Type 56, is one of the most popular semi-automatic rifles. By the end of World War II, however, semi-automatic rifles had been largely superseded in military usage by their fully automatic counterparts - weapons such as the AK-47, FN FAL and M16 limited the viability of widespread deployment of semi-automatic rifles.

Gradually, military doctrine placed less emphasis on individual marksmanship, as a large volume of fire was deemed more important - during World War II, American ground forces fired approximately 25,000 rounds for each enemy killed. In the Korean War, this was raised to 50,000, and in the Vietnam War it was 200,000. [14] The first fully automatic rifle to see widespread usage was the German StG 44, which was well liked by troops, as the 30-round, selective fire rifle gave them much more flexibility than their service rifle, the bolt action Karabiner 98k. Ultimately, automatic rifles would become standard in military usage, as their firepower was superior to that of a semi-automatic rifle, but both semi-automatics and even bolt actions are still used worldwide in military service in specific roles, such as designated marksman rifles where the greater accuracy compared to automatics is valued. Furthermore, to accommodate for this greater firepower, battle rifles were mostly replaced by assault rifles, whose lighter bullets allowed more to be carried at once, but where semi-automatic rifles continue to be used, they are usually in higher calibers, such as the .50 BMG Barrett M82.

Semi-automatic weapons use gas, blow-forward, blowback or recoil energy to eject the spent cartridge after the round has moved down the barrel, chambering a new cartridge from its magazine, and resetting the action. This enables another round to be fired once the trigger is depressed again.

Semi-automatic rifles can be efficiently fed by an en-bloc clip, external magazine, or stripper clip.

The self-loading design was a successor to earlier rifles that required manual cycling of the weapon after each shot, such as the bolt-action rifle or repeating rifles. The ability to automatically load the next round results in an increase in the rounds per minute the operator can fire.

The primary advantage of self-loading rifles is the possibility of increasing the number of effective shots fired within any given time period by avoiding the necessity for changing the aiming position of the rifle to manually chamber new cartridges. The actual number of hits per unit of time depends upon the magazine capacity and the availability of detachable magazines, but semi-automatic rifles can typically more than double the number of hits from comparable manually-loaded rifles at close range and increase the number of hits by about 50 percent at longer distances which require more precise aiming. Firing for prolonged periods may increase this advantage as the manual-loading process can cause fatigue. The additional weight of springs and fittings using a portion of the cartridge energy to reload self-loading rifles have the additional advantage of reducing recoil. [15]

The self-loading mechanism tuned for cartridges of specified dimensions and power may fail to reload dirty or bent cartridges that will otherwise fire satisfactorily. The self-loading mechanism may fail to extract empty low-power cartridge cases useful for training, and high-power cartridges useful at longer ranges may damage the self-loading mechanism. Some self-loading rifles require externally lubricated cartridges vulnerable to dirt adhesion. Any reliability problems causing failure of the self-loading mechanism to function as designed may eliminate the advantage of increased hits per unit of time, and may actually reduce the comparative rate of fire below what is possible with manually-loaded rifles if the self-loading rifle is not designed for convenient manual-loading. The United Kingdom regarded the reliable rate of fire from manually-loaded rifles to be nearly as high as self-loading rifles as recently as World War II. [16]

Semi-automatic rifles are uniquely susceptible to slamfire malfunctions caused by abrupt cartridge acceleration during self-loading. Slamfire discharges are unlikely to hit the target, and may cause collateral damage. [17]

The time required for changing or reloading magazines can weaken the effectiveness of a rifle, as it imposes an effective duration limit on the continuous rate of fire of any rifle. High-capacity magazines increase the weight of the rifle, and typically reduce feeding reliability due to the varying spring tension from a full to a nearly empty magazine. Detachable magazines in general are usually less durable than internal magazines.

The complexity of a self-loading mechanism makes self-loading rifles more expensive to manufacture and heavier than manually-loaded rifles. The semi-automatic M1 Garand weighs about 410 grams (0.9 lb) more (seven percent heavier) than the manually-loaded M1903 Springfield rifle it replaced. American development of a self-loading infantry rifle began with the .276 Pedersen cartridge in recognition of the difficulties of producing reliable self-loading mechanisms for more powerful cartridges. Although the Garand was ultimately adapted to fire the .30-06 Springfield cartridge at the insistence of General Douglas MacArthur, [18] most subsequent self-loading rifles for infantry use have been chambered for less powerful cartridges to reduce weight making rifles easier to carry.

Semi-automatic rifles are commonly used by civilians for sport shooting, hunting, and self-defense, as they are cheaper and less heavily regulated than their fully automatic counterparts.

Sport shooting Edit

Target shooting has a long history, pre-dating the firearm, as the first example of it would be archery, and as weapons that demanded user accuracy developed, so did their usage in competitions. Today, semi-automatic rifles are one of the more popular firearms in sport shooting. There are various types of sport shooting, ranging from rapid fire shooting, target shooting, which is predominantly accuracy based, and distance shooting. Shooting clubs in America became increasingly commonplace in the 1830s, [19] and have since grown in popularity. Semi-automatic rifles are commonly used in sport shooting events because of their accuracy, versatility, and their light weight- which has invited more people, specifically women and children, to compete as well.

Hunting Edit

Semi-automatic rifles have grown in status among hunters. Many hunters are adopting semi-automatic rifles, particularly AR-15 style rifles to take advantage of their compact design, effectively making it easier to traverse rugged terrain while tracking a target. Semi-automatic fire greatly assists in maintaining one's sight picture, which is especially important when follow-up shots are required. [20] Due to their demand, the manufacturers of semi-automatic firearms have greatly increased the effective firing distance of their products, compared to the first semi-automatics sold on the civilian market.

Self defense Edit

Semi-automatic rifles are sometimes used for self-defense. [21] [22] Most semi-automatic rifles are rather lightweight and simple to operate, without compromising accuracy. Semi-automatic rifles are able to quickly dispatch multiple targets in a home invasion. [23] Most semi-automatic rifles also have sights which can be adjusted for range, [24] providing versatility.

    (not to be confused with "Assault weapon") - certain semi-automatic rifles are classified as assault weapons in some jurisdictions

Johnson, Melvin M. (1944). Rifles and Machine Guns. New York: William Morrow and Company.


By 1940, it became apparent that some form of a semi-automatic rifle, with a higher rate of fire than existing bolt-action rifle models, was necessary to improve the infantry's combat efficiency. The Wehrmacht issued a specification to various manufacturers, and Mauser and Walther submitted prototypes that were very similar. However, some restrictions were placed upon the design:

  • no holes for tapping gas for the loading mechanism were to be bored into the barrel
  • the rifles were not to have any moving parts on the surface
  • and in case the auto-loading mechanism failed, a bolt action was to be included.

Both models therefore used a mechanism known as the "Bang" system (after its Danish designer Søren H. Bang). In this system, propellant gases were captured by a cone-shaped gas trap at the muzzle, which in turn deflected them to operate a small piston which in turn pushed on a long piston rod that opened the breech and re-loaded the gun. This is as opposed to the more common type of gas-actuated system, in which gases are tapped off from the barrel, and push back on a piston to open the breech to the rear. Both also included fixed 10-round magazines that were loaded using two of the stripper clips from the Karabiner 98k, utilizing the same German-standard 7.92×57mm Mauser rounds. This in turn made reloading relatively slow (as compared to rifles which had magazines that could be reloaded from a single unit, such as the M1 Garand, although it was typical for its time, being identical to the reloading procedure of the 10-round Lee–Enfield).

The Mauser design, the G41(M), failed. Only 6,673 were produced before production was halted, and of these, 1,673 were returned as unusable. Most metal parts on this rifle were machined steel and some rifles, especially later examples, utilized the Bakelite type plastic handguards. The Walther design was more successful because the designers had simply ignored the last two restrictions listed above.

These rifles, along with their G41(M) counterparts, suffered from gas system fouling problems. These problems seemed to stem from the overly complex muzzle trap system becoming excessively corroded from the use of corrosive salts in the ammunition primers, and carbon fouling. The muzzle assembly consisted of many small parts and was difficult to keep clean, disassemble, and maintain in field conditions. The rifle was redesigned in 1943 into the Gewehr 43, utilizing a gas system somewhat similar to that on the SVT-40 and a detachable magazine.

G41(W) rifles were produced at two factories, namely Walther at Zella Mehlis, and Berlin-Lübecker Maschinenfabrik. Walther guns bear the AC code, and WaA359 inspection proofs, while BLM guns bear the DUV code with WaA214 inspection proofs. These rifles are also relatively scarce, and quite valuable in collector grade. Varying sources put production figures between 40,000 and 145,000 units. Again, these rifles saw a high attrition rate on the Eastern front.


Rough Forged : A History and Collector's Guide to German Self-Loading Rifles of WWII

COL W. Darrin Weaver (Ret.) MPA PA-C, raises cattle with his family in Central Texas, serves as the CEO of Front Sight Post Publishing LLC, and provides emergency and urgent care to servicemen and family members for the US Department of the Army. Darrin served an enlisted tour in the Berlin Brigade's 5/502nd Infantry, and was decorated for marksmanship by the US Army and the German Bundeswehr. He was selected for Officer Candidate School and commissioned upon graduating from the University of Oklahoma as a Physician Assistant in 1994, and later earned a Masters from the University of Nebraska. He served with several armored, infantry and cavalry units to include Joint Task Force-6 andTask Force XXI, left active duty in 1999 and continued service in the Veteran's Administration, and later, the National Security Personnel System, in addition to the Texas Army National Guard. Darrin graduated from the Army Command & General Staff Course, served a tour in Iraq as a battalion medical officer and flew MEDEVAC and CASEVAC missions in support of Multi-National Corps-Iraq and Combined Joint Special Operations Air Component operations. Darrin went on to command at the company, battalion and brigade levels and continues as adjunct faculty for a local university as well as the DoD. Darrin has a keen interest in and has done extensive research on the German wartime economy, industrial practices, and production methodologies. His other published works include the Collector Grade titles Hitler's Garands: German Self-Loading Rifles of WWII (2001), Desperate Measures: Last-Ditch Weapons of the Nazi Volkssturm (2005) and Mauser Pistolen (2008), as well as Kunststoffe: A Collector's Guide to German World War II Plastics and their Markings (2008) and An Encyclopedia of German Tradenames and Trademarks 1900-1945 (2010) available from Schiffer Publishing, as well as numerous articles in medical and firearms-related periodicals. Darrin is a lifetime member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the National Rifle Association.


Walther Gewehr 43 (G43 / Gew 43)

Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 06/03/2019 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

The Gewehr 43 (Gew 43) became the next evolution of the Walther Gew 41(W) of 1941 - a self-loading, semi-automatic rifle that failed to see require production numbers to make a proper wartime impression. In 1940, the Germans enacted a program to deliver a standard semi-automatic rifle to their infantry ranks to help improve their outmoded bolt-action rifle units. The British, Americans, and Soviets were already issuing such weapons to their troops leaving the Germans with little choice. However, the Gew 41(W) proved too expensive for wartime mass production, relied on a complex gas system prone to fouling, and was difficult to reload due to its fixed magazine approach (fed by a pair of clips).

Eventually finding themselves against the Soviet Army and their Tokarev automatic rifles, the Germans evaluated and dissected the gas-operation system (that tapped gasses from the barrel) to feed an automatic action. Conversely, the Gew 41(W) was designed with a complicated muzzle-based gas actuated system of operation which made the gun "muzzle-heavy" and unnecessarily temperamental. With the foreign technology in hand, Walther set to work on an improved form of the Gew 41(W) and ultimately delivered the Gew 43 in 1943. In something of an ode to its enemy designers, the original Soviet gas system of the production Gew 43 remained largely intact.

While outwardly similar to the Gew 41, the Gew 43 fielded a number of improvements over its predecessor. The bolt locking system of the former was retained but the aforementioned gas system itself was of an all-new design. Additionally, the 10-round magazine was now made as a detachable box though still utilizing the 7.92x57mm Mauser cartridge - the same as used in the standard-issue German Army Mauser Karabiner Kar 98 service rifle. A sight mount was directly machined onto the receiver for the fitting of an optional Zf42 series optical crosshair scope for precision shooting at range.

With production ramped up, the Gew 43 was delivered into the hands of German soldiers by the end of 1943 and placed into action immediately against Red Army foes. From there, the line would go on to see combat elsewhere in the war though, owing to limited availability, it tended to be found mostly with German special units. The appearance of the Gew 43 led to the stoppage of all production on the preceding Gew 41 series but the Gew 41 still saw operational use beyond 1943 - such was the dire state of the German Army towards the end of the war that any automatic weapon was better than none. German troops lucky enough to handle the newer Gew 43 ultimately respected its inherent power and rugged man-stopping, self-loading qualities but the series often lacked when compared to her contemporaries of the day.

The powerful 7.92x57mm Mauser rifle cartridge, when coupled with a scoped Gew 43, made for an effective sniper weapon system. The weapon's self-loading action worked well as the operator did not need to operate a manual bolt mechanism to ready the next cartridge - he could simply could keep scanning the battlefield for available targets and fire repeatedly until his magazine ammunition supply was spent. The optical sighting scope was fitted to the upper rear of the receiver's end along two support points and all Gew 43 sniper rifles for the German Army were issued (when possible) in this simple modified fashion.

At any regard, the Gew 43 surpassed the original Gew 41. Attempts were constantly being made to simplify the production process with plastic, and even laminated wood, used in the furniture to replace valuable materials needed elsewhere in the German war effort. The latter months of the war saw Gew 43s leaving factories with some rather crude finishes due to haste. In 1944, the "Karabiner 43" was even brought online as a more simple form of the base Gew 43 design. Though designated as a carbine in name, the Karabiner 43 was only shorter than the original by some 2 inches to help make her a more portable weapon system. This version was further differentiated by its larger trigger guard.

When the war in Europe concluded in May of 1945, production of the Gew 43 still continued to some extent thereafter. The Czech Army became a notable post-war operator, admiring the system's usefulness particularly in the sniper role. In all, 402,713 Gew 43 rifles were produced - seemingly a large amount but a figure that did not truly reflect complete success for the gun. Comparatively, the American war-winning M1 Garand self-loading rifle saw production figures reach 6 million and even the Soviets managed 1.6 million units of their Tokarev SVT-40 semi-automatic rifles. With that said, at least fifty Garands were produced for every one Gew 43.


Early WWII German Semi-Automatic Rifles

The Gewehr 41 was Germany’s first attempt at a semi-automatic rifle in the class of the American M1 Garand. The designation Gewehr 41 was given to two different weapons (although they look rather identical, they differ a lot and are not based on each other). A first weapon made by Mauser, the Gewehr 41 (M) (“rifle 41”, “M”-suffix denominating the producer Mauser) or G 41 (M) failed miserably, only 6,673 (other sources: 14,334) were produced before production was halted, and of these the army returned 1,673 as unusable. The story on the Gewehr 41 abbreviated G 41 produced by Walther isn’t much different although it had a much simpler and reliable system that also eased production, this second G 41 still was both barrel-heavy and very sensitive to dirt because of the gas-nozzle located at the muzzle. This unfortunate placement of the gas-extraction at the muzzle was necessary because the advising army weapon’s bureau insisted that no holes be drilled into the barrel itself (!). The weapon was very unpopular among the troops. Still, 122,907 were built well into 1944.
Both the the G 41 (M) and the G 41 could be fixed with bayonets, early models often were fitted with the small 1.5x scopes, late G 41 mounted the 4x scopes. The weapon at right shows a G 41 with Zielfernrohr 41 scope of 1.5x magnification. Neither model could use the Schiessbecher rifle-grenade firing device. Both weapons featured an internal magazine for 10 rounds, it was loaded with 2 of the regular Mauser 5-round clips the regular Mauser 98k ammo pouches were used.. Technical data for G 41 : length 114cm barrel length 55cm weight (empty) 4.6kg Vo 745m/s ammunition: Infanteriepatrone 7,92吵

After the weapon’s bureau of the army nullified their requirement that there be no holes drilled into the barrel itself for the gas-mechanism to work for the automatic rifle system, the company Walther went on to develop the Gewehr 43. This new semi-automatic rifle had the extraction nozzle drilled into the barrel and featured a removable 10-round magazine. The G 43 was a beautiful design which was much cheaper and faster to produce. The weapon’s designation was later changed to Karabiner 43, abbreviated K 43, although the weapon really wasn’t a carbine it was envisioned to replace the Mauser Karabiner 98k as the standard infantry rifle. Production started in October 1943 total production until the end of the war was 402,713 including at least 53,435 sniper rifles: the well-designed and well-machined K 43 was a preferred sniper weapon and was fitted with the Zielfernrohr 43, also called ZF 4, scope with a magnification of 4x. The weapon could use the Schiessbecher device for firing rifle grenades and could use a Schalldämpfer silencer however, the G 43 could not fix a bayonet. Technical data: length 112cm length barrel 55cm (versions with barrel lengths of 60cm, 65cm and even 70cm existed) weight empty (w/o magazine and w/o scope) 4.1kg weight magazine (empty) 230g weight Zielfernrohr 43 scope: 1.3kg ammunition: Infanteriepatrone 7,92吵 Vo 745m/s practical rate of fire 30 rounds per minute