Information

THOMAS FENWICK DRAYTON, CSA - History


GENERAL THOMAS FENWICK DRAYTON, CSA
VITAL STATISTICS
BORN: 1808 in Charleston, SC.
DIED: 1891 in Florence, SC.
CAMPAIGNS: Port Royal, Second Bull Run, South Mountain and Antietam.
HIGHEST RANK ACHIEVED: Brigadier General.
BIOGRAPHY
Thomas Fenwick Drayton was born on August 24, 1808, in Charleston, South Carolina. He graduated from West Point in 1828, where he formed a lifelong friendship with Jefferson Finis Davis. In 1836, Drayton resigned from the army, running his plantation and working as a railroad director and state legislator. When the Civil War began, he was commissioned a brigadier general (September 25, 1861). Placed in command of the military district at Port Royal, South Carolina, he was unable to defend the post against a Union naval attack. Drayton's brother, Comdr. Percival Drayton, was commander of the leading Union warship, the "Pocahontas," in the attack. Thomas Drayton led his brigade at the Battles of Bull Run (Second), South Mountain and Antietam. At South Mountain and Antietam, he showed himself to be a poor field commander. General Lee assigned Drayton to other brigades, although the decision was difficult and embarrassing for him. Drayton spent the last two years of the war in the Trans-Mississippi Department, leading a brigade in the District of Arkansas and later commanding the Subdistrict of Texas. He went on to serve as president of the court of inquiry which investigated Maj. Gen. Sterling Price's raid into Missouri. After the end of the Civil War, Drayton became a farmer in Georgia. He then moved to North Carolina, where he worked as a life insurance agent. Drayton died in Florence, South Carolina, on February 18, 1891.

THOMAS FENWICK DRAYTON, CSA - History

Captain Percival Drayton (1812-1865) of Charleston, South Carolina and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was a distinguished U.S. Navy officer who served in the Union Navy during the Civil War. The Percival Drayton family papers, 1827-1967, chiefly document Percival Drayton's naval career, particularly during the Civil War. Drayton's papers, 1827-1865, comprise correspondence, naval orders and reports, a diary, financial papers, and certificates. The remainder, 1845-1967, consists of papers created or received by other Drayton family members and relatives, as well as ephemera, photographs, and printed material, mostly pertaining to Percival Drayton. Also included are letters written by an unidentified relative, a naval notebook, and later family correspondence regarding Drayton's naval service, as well as two manifest books for shipments of tobacco in the Maryland-District of Columbia area, 1803-1817, their connection to the Drayton family being unclear.


Earliest Inhabitants

When William Hilton landed in the Lowcountry in 1663, he was greeted by Spanish-speaking Indians from the Yemassee tribe, who had migrated north from Florida 100 years prior. He also encountered the native Escamacus Indians, but little is known of the earlier native civilization that inhabited the Island as far back as 4,000 years ago. Remnants of mysterious shell rings, measuring up to 240 feet across and nine feet high, can still be found on the Island. Yet, like the enigmatic rocks of Stonehenge and the carvings of Easter Island, their secrets remain hidden. Today, you can view these artifacts of Hilton Head Island history at Sea Pines Forest Preserve and on the north end of the Island, off Squire Pope Road in Green Shell Park.


Fish Haul Creek (Drayton) Plantation

Land - 1100 acres, 700 were the original Fish Haul Creek Plantation, 400 were Pine Barrens.

Maps - Hack, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, before 1861

Holmgren, Hilton Head, A Sea Island Chronicle
Holmgren, Research on Hilton Head Island
Peeples, An Index to Hilton Head Island Names
Peeples, Tales of Ante Bellum Hilton Head Island Families
Porcher, The Story of Sea Island Cotton

Addtional Information:

Beach City Road
Also see Coggins Point Plantation, Fort Howell, Fort Walker

The plantation lands acquired jointly by Samuel Green and Edmund Ellis after 1740 stretched from Fish Haul Creek westward along Port Royal Sound. In 1785, Sarah Green Tucker, widow of Thomas Tucker and daughter of Samuel Green, married Captain William Pope and made Fish Haul their primary residence. Emma Catherine Pope married General Thomas Fenwick Drayton in 1832. General Drayton used Fish Haul as his headquarters for the Confederate defenses of Hilton Head Island until 1861. Tabby ruins and a plantation cemetery are all that remain. (198?)

". island planter Samuel Green in his earlier will of 24 February 1767 left his Fish Haul Plantation, where he lived, to his son Samuel. Eventually Sarah Green. became sole heiress to all this and married William Pope, Sr. "

"William Drayton and his wife Mary were owners of 1100 acres, 700 of which were the original Fish Haul Creek Plantation (often called Fish Hall) probably bought from Samuel Green heirs about 1770. (see above entry). Part of this estate was sold by the Federal government to Negroes and part kept for a military reservation. The remainder was redeemed March 1875 for $407.83 in taxes by the heirs of Mary (Drayton) Pope who had evidently remarried. and they offered to give land for a new cemetery and for a church also if the next-of-kin would remove bodies buried near their home. In 1877 the heirs began selling in small plots and in 1931 Thorne and Loomis bought Fish Haul land in thirteen different transactions."

The 1989 Chicora Foundation work on the Fish Haul Slave Row was the first published archaeological documentation of a slave settlement on Hilton Head Island. Three five foot units and some standing tabby chimneys were noted.

Trinkley, Chicora Research Series 28, Archaeological Testing at the Stoney/Baynard Plantation, Hilton Head Island, Beaufort County, South Carolina, p. 16 (Source material noted in survey)

The 38BU806 portion of Drayton's Fish Haul Plantation slave row (38BU805 in 1986 Chicora work and in 1989 Brockington work), judged to be one of the most significant archaeological sites on Hilton Head. High degree of site integrity and archaeological remains in excellent state of preservation. Recommended as eligible for National Register of Historic Places. Barker Field is about ten acres county owned and operated, managed by Beaufort County Recreation Department.

  • Trinkley, Chicora Research Series 17, Archaeological Survey of the Barker Field Expansion Project, Hilton Head Island, Beaufort County, South Carolina (Source material listed in survey)

Colonel John Barnwell received a Royal Grant for 500 acres on December 10, 1717. He named it Fish Haul. His son, John, and wife, Martha, sold it to Edward Ellis, October 24, 1760. In 1838 Thomas F. Drayton married Mary Baynard Pope and they resided with her mother, Mary Baynard Pope, at Fish Haul. (father was John Edward Pope) When Mary died in 1856, Thomas was named administrator of her estate and operated Fish Haul in trust for seven minor Drayton children.

The 1860 slave census shows 52 slaves on Fish Haul. The Agricultural census of 1860 shows 250 improved acres, 450 unimproved, valued at $10,000. Absence of farm animals on the list indicates strongly oriented cotton plantation. Grain and food were raised for local use.

In the 1863 tax sales the property was sold to the Federal government for $3,000. The listing of 1300 acres suggests the combining of Fish Haul and the adjacent Pinelands Plantation. Drayton is recorded as providing "substantial slave quarters in good condition" and the main house as "lordly". Photographs from 1862 substantiate these statements.

In 1862 about 200 acres was used to create the freedmen’s village of Mitchelville.

Fish Haul was rented to Bacchus Singleton, in trust for himself and those living on the land who paid their part of the rent of $220 in 1862. The rental was subject to military occupation and half of the mansion house was held for a school. Certain restrictions applied such as only half of the arable land could be cultivated in any given year - the other half being fallow. The government could take a lien on the crop guaranteeing payment of rent, no one living on the property could be forced off, all work was shared equally and no one could live in the mansion house.

In 1867 the plantation was home to 120 blacks. The rent was $90.

By 1868 the land was rented to Summer Christopher. In 1871 the rental was $140 and no longer "in trust". After 1871 the land was no longer rented.

On April 17, 1875 the heirs of Mary Baynard Pope paid $407.83 for about 1300 acres including Pineland tract and the village of Mitchelville. Approximately 803 acres on Hilton Head Point south and east of Fish Haul Creek were retained by the Federal government for a military reservation. (Coggins Point). Wishing to sell the property the Draytons (heirs of Mary Baynard Pope) offered to donate some lots for 'church purposes'. They authorized their attorneys to establish a cemetery on Fish Haul and to give plots to those who would move their dead from the burial site near the mansion house. This seems not to have succeeded.

On December 9, 1876, 147.5 acres was sold to Robert McIntire who in turn sold it to Gabriel Gardner on February 20, 1878. On August 20, 1888 Gardner sold 650 acres (included the Gardner Plantation) to Summer Christopher, et. al.. The heirs of Christopher sold the ten acre parcel containing the Fish Haul Slave Row to Fred Owens, Jr. in 1894.

By 1920 the main house had disappeared. He held the property until it was sold in 1965 to the Hilton Head Company. From there it went to the Port Royal Plantation Group and then to Palmetto Dunes.

In 1978 the Hilton Head Gators acquired 7.4 acres from Palmetto Dunes. In 1980 the Beaufort County Recreation Commission took over the property.

In 1989 the site contains at least six structures. Above ground each building is marked by a tabby chimney base. The tabby used is a distinct mix containing whole clam shell in addition to the normal oyster shell aggregate. Broken brick, glass and ceramics are also spotted in the tabby. The mix provides a well compacted, dense and strong material.

"The project area is situated on a portion of what is traditionally known as Fish Haul Plantation. A typical cotton producing plantation in the antebellum period, Fish Haul and all of Hilton Head became victims of war. Union forces took over the island in 1861, used the Fish Haul main house as a home for the commanding general, camped troops, built sawmills and logged the property, and on the project tract constructed a freedman village (Mitchelville) and an earthwork fort (Fort Howell).

. in 1717 John Barnwell received a grant on the northwest corner of the island. Trinkley cites several sources. that the grant was for 500 acres and was described as Fish Haul in a 1760 sale to Edward Ellis. Both Holmgren and Peeples contribute colonial ownership of Fish Haul to Samuel Green and thence to his daughter Sarah Green Tucker. William Pope was the widower of Sarah Green Tucker Pope in 1798. Confederate General Thomas Drayton was managing Fish Haul in trust for his children, the heirs of Mary B. Pope, when the Civil War began.


Drayton, Percival

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Drayton held the rank of commander. Of the navy’s fifteen hundred officers, one-quarter left to serve with the South. But Drayton did not and chose instead the cause of Union.

Naval officer. Drayton was born on August 25, 1812, in Charleston, the son of William Drayton (1776&ndash1846) and Ann Gadsden. His father served in Congress from 1825 to 1833 and was a leading opponent of nullification in the early 1830s, and he eventually moved his family from Charleston to Philadelphia. Drayton&rsquos older brother, Thomas Fenwick Drayton, was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy. After army service, Thomas returned to South Carolina and became a successful planter and state senator.

At age fifteen, Percival Drayton was appointed midshipman in the U.S. Navy. He entered the service twenty years prior to the founding of the naval academy at Annapolis, and his naval training followed the old pattern inherited from England. Future naval officers began their professional lives not at formal schools but by learning the ropes at sea as midshipmen. He served aboard frigates engaged in protecting U.S. commerce abroad or showing the flag on distant stations. His assignments took him to the Brazilian, Mediterranean, and Pacific squadrons. Eventually he commanded the schooner USS Enterprise and served in a variety of vessels, including the Mississippi, the navy&rsquos third steam-powered warship.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Drayton held the rank of commander. Of the navy&rsquos fifteen hundred officers, one-quarter left to serve with the South. But Drayton did not and chose instead the cause of Union. In November 1861 he commanded a ship in the Port Royal expedition, in which Union forces captured Hilton Head Island, Beaufort, and Parris Island in order to gain a base for operations against Savannah and Charleston. In the battle his brother Thomas, a Confederate brigadier general, commanded the forts whose guns exchanged fire with Drayton&rsquos ship.

Drayton&rsquos performance won him promotion to captain and command of one of the new Ericsson-designed Monitor-class ironclads, the USS Passaic. In April 1863 Drayton took part in the attempt to use nine ironclads&ndashthe first time armored vessels were employed in anything approaching a fleet action&ndashto fight their way into Charleston harbor. The attack proved unsuccessful, but Drayton was soon named flag captain under Rear Admiral David Farragut. He commanded Farragut&rsquos flagship, USS Hartford, at the Battle of Mobile Bay in August 1864. It was to Drayton that Farragut shouted the command famously associated with that action: &ldquoDamn the torpedoes! Full steam ahead!&rdquo

Following the battle, Drayton accompanied Farragut to a triumphal reception in New York. In South Carolina, however, he was regarded quite differently. The General Assembly passed measures formally condemning him to legal banishment and exile. He was not to return in any event. Four months after the war ended, while serving in Washington as chief of the Bureau of Navigation, Drayton died on August 4, 1865, following a brief illness. He had never married.

Ammen, Daniel. The Navy in the Civil War. Vol. 2, The Atlantic Coast. 1883. Reprint, Harrisburg, Pa.: Archive Society, 1992.

Canney, Donald L. Lincoln&rsquos Navy: The Ships, Men and Organization, 1861&ndash65. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1998.

Halsey, Ashley, Jr. &ldquoI Rue the Day I Got into the Ironclad Business.&rdquo Civil War Times Illustrated 4 (April 1965): 28&ndash34.

Mahan, A. T. The Navy in the Civil War. Vol. 3, The Gulf and Inland Waters. 1883. Reprint, Harrisburg, Pa.: Archive Society, 1992.


Descendants of Thomas Drayton

1. Thomas Drayton , Hon (Thomas Drayton , Magnolia Plantation1) was born 1700 in of Magnolia Plantation, and died 11 Nov 1760.

He married Elizabeth Bull 26 Dec 1730 in ” South Carolina Marriages”, daughter of William Bull , I, LT Gov. SC and Mary Quintyne. She was born 9 Mar 1711/12 in oldest dau, and died AFT. 28 Aug 1745 in “Bio Hist SC Hse Rep” Vol 2, 202. He married Mary Mackenzie , Right Hon. Lady BEF. 1735, daughter of George (3rd Earl Cromartie) Mackenzie. She was born in Lady Mary of Henry’s will- her father banished Scots earl, and died 21 Nov 1788 in at sea.

Children of Thomas Drayton , Hon and Elizabeth Bull are:
+ 2 i. William Drayton , Chief Justice was born 21 Mar 1731/32 in “Magnolia”, Ashley River, SC- eldest surv child-2nd son, and died 18 May 1790 in SC- went East FL 1763> Chf. Justice1767>England>SC.
+ 3 ii. Mary Drayton was born 21 Dec 1734 in “Plantations of the Low Country”p33, and died 1806 in grandau of LT Gov Bull “Oligarchs” p37, 320.
+ 4 iii. Stephen Drayton , LT Col was born 28 Apr 1736 in St. Andrew Par., SC > St. Luke Parish, and died 23 Nov 1810 in “Bio Hist SC Hse Rep” Vol 2, 202, see “Oligarchs”p319.
5 iv. Henrietta Charlotte Drayton was born 28 Jul 1743.
6 v. John Drayton was born 28 Aug 1745.
Descendant Register, Generation No. 2
2. William Drayton , Chief Justice (Thomas Drayton , Hon2, Thomas Drayton , Magnolia Plantation1) was born 21 Mar 1731/32 in “Magnolia”, Ashley River, SC- eldest surv child-2nd son, and died 18 May 1790 in SC- went East FL 1763> Chf. Justice1767>England>SC. He married Mary Motte 4 Oct 1759 in ” South Carolina Marriages” … 9 children, daughter of Jacob Motte , Treasurer and Elizabeth Martin. She was born 8 Jan 1739/40, and died ABT. 1778 in England. He married Mary Gates ABT. 1780 in 2nd wife, 1 child.

Children of William Drayton , Chief Justice and Mary Motte are:
7 i. Elizabeth Drayton was born 1761.
8 ii. Jacob Drayton , LT Cont. Army was born ABT. 1762.
9 iii. Hannah Drayton was born 1764.
10 iv. Mary Charlotte Drayton was born 1766.
11 v. Thomas Drayton was born 1775, and died 1794.
+ 12 vi. William Drayton , Col War 1812 was born 20 Dec 1776 in St. Autustine, East Florida>Charleston>PA 1833-youngest, and died 24 May 1846 in Philidelphia, PA-“Am. Cyclp. of Bio”.
3. Mary Drayton (Thomas Drayton , Hon2, Thomas Drayton , Magnolia Plantation1) was born 21 Dec 1734 in “Plantations of the Low Country”p33, and died 1806 in grandau of LT Gov Bull “Oligarchs” p37, 320. She married Edward Fenwick , Hon., Esq. ABT. 1 Mar 1753 in Charleston, SC- “Gazette”, son of John Fenwick , Fenwick Hall and Elizabeth Gibbes. He was born 22 Jan 1719/20 in Member of His Majesty’s Council, and died 5 Jul 1775 in “Oligarchs” p242 – of Fenwick Hall.

Children of Mary Drayton and Edward Fenwick , Hon., Esq. are:
13 i. Edward Fenwick , Jr., Tory was born 12 Dec 1753 in sold Fenwick Hall to cousin John Gibbs. He married Christina Stuart in NY- he was disinherited for this marriage, daughter of John Stuart , Royalist.
14 ii. Sarah Fenwick was born 3 Dec 1756. She married George Jones , Dr.. He was born in of Savannah, GA. She married McCartan Campbell 27 Feb 1777. He was born in of Augusta, GA.
15 iii. Thomas Fenwick , Traitor was born 19 Dec 1758.
16 iv. Mary Fenwick was born ABT. 1759. She married Walter Izard 7 Nov 1779 in St. Phillip’s, Charleston, SC, son of Ralph Izard , Capt and Rebecca Blake. He died 1788.
+ 17 v. Martha Fenwick was born 15 Jan 1760.
18 vi. Harriette Fenwick was born 5 Mar 1769. She married Josiah Tatnall , Gov. Of GA.
4. Stephen Drayton , LT Col (Thomas Drayton , Hon2, Thomas Drayton , Magnolia Plantation1) was born 28 Apr 1736 in St. Andrew Par., SC > St. Luke Parish, and died 23 Nov 1810 in “Bio Hist SC Hse Rep” Vol 2, 202, see “Oligarchs”p319. He married Ann Betts in no record of kids. She died 1766. He married Elizabeth Waring in “Bio Hist SC Hse Rep” Vol 2, 203, daughter of Josiah Waring. She was born ABT. 1740 in 2nd wife.

Children of Stephen Drayton , LT Col and Elizabeth Waring are:
19 i. Edward Percival Drayton.
20 ii. Henry Augustus Drayton.
Descendant Register, Generation No. 3
12. William Drayton , Col War 1812 (William Drayton , Chief Justice3, Thomas Drayton , Hon2, Thomas Drayton , Magnolia Plantation1) was born 20 Dec 1776 in St. Autustine, East Florida>Charleston>PA 1833-youngest, and died 24 May 1846 in Philidelphia, PA-“Am. Cyclp. of Bio”. He married Maria Miles Heyward in 5 children- “Am. Cyclp. of Bio”, daughter of William Heyward , Esq. and Hannah Shubrick. She was born 20 Oct 1784 in “South Carolina Genealogies” Vol 2, 359. He married Ann Gadsden in 4 children, daughter of Thomas Gadsden , Capt. and Martha Fenwick. She was born AFT. 1778.

Children of William Drayton , Col War 1812 and Ann Gadsden are:
21 i. Thomas Fenwick Drayton , Gen. CSA was born 24 Aug 1808 in Charleston, SC> West Point classmate Jeff Davis, and died 18 Feb 1891 in Florence, SC -after War:failed planter GA, Soth. Life Ins..
22 ii. Percival Drayton , US Navy was born 25 Aug 1812 in South Carolina>Navy>Philadelphia>Civil War, and died 4 Aug 1865 in Wash. D.C.- fought brother, Gen TF Drayton at Port Royal. He married Never Married.
17. Martha Fenwick (Mary Drayton3, Thomas Drayton , Hon2, Thomas Drayton , Magnolia Plantation1) was born 15 Jan 1760. She married Thomas Gadsden , Capt. 15 Oct 1778 in Charles Town, SC – “Gazette”, son of Thomas Gadsden.

Child of Martha Fenwick and Thomas Gadsden , Capt. is:
+ 23 i. Ann Gadsden was born AFT. 1778.
Descendant Register, Generation No. 4
23. Ann Gadsden (Martha Fenwick4, Mary Drayton3, Thomas Drayton , Hon2, Thomas Drayton , Magnolia Plantation1) was born AFT. 1778. She married William Drayton , Col War 1812 in 4 children, son of William Drayton , Chief Justice and Mary Motte. He was born 20 Dec 1776 in St. Autustine, East Florida>Charleston>PA 1833-youngest, and died 24 May 1846 in Philidelphia, PA-“Am. Cyclp. of Bio”.


Fish Haul Creek Plantation

Land - 1100 acres, 700 were the original Fish Haul Creek Plantation, 400 were Pine Barrens.

Maps - Hack, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, before 1861

Holmgren, Hilton Head, A Sea Island Chronicle
Holmgren, Research on Hilton Head Island
Peeples, An Index to Hilton Head Island Names
Peeples, Tales of Ante Bellum Hilton Head Island Families
Porcher, The Story of Sea Island Cotton

Addtional Information:

Beach City Road
Also see Coggins Point Plantation, Fort Howell, Fort Walker

The plantation lands acquired jointly by Samuel Green and Edmund Ellis after 1740 stretched from Fish Haul Creek westward along Port Royal Sound. In 1785, Sarah Green Tucker, widow of Thomas Tucker and daughter of Samuel Green, married Captain William Pope and made Fish Haul their primary residence. Emma Catherine Pope married General Thomas Fenwick Drayton in 1832. General Drayton used Fish Haul as his headquarters for the Confederate defenses of Hilton Head Island until 1861. Tabby ruins and a plantation cemetery are all that remain. (198?)

". island planter Samuel Green in his earlier will of 24 February 1767 left his Fish Haul Plantation, where he lived, to his son Samuel. Eventually Sarah Green. became sole heiress to all this and married William Pope, Sr. "

"William Drayton and his wife Mary were owners of 1100 acres, 700 of which were the original Fish Haul Creek Plantation (often called Fish Hall) probably bought from Samuel Green heirs about 1770. (see above entry). Part of this estate was sold by the Federal government to Negroes and part kept for a military reservation. The remainder was redeemed March 1875 for $407.83 in taxes by the heirs of Mary (Drayton) Pope who had evidently remarried. and they offered to give land for a new cemetery and for a church also if the next-of-kin would remove bodies buried near their home. In 1877 the heirs began selling in small plots and in 1931 Thorne and Loomis bought Fish Haul land in thirteen different transactions."

The 1989 Chicora Foundation work on the Fish Haul Slave Row was the first published archaeological documentation of a slave settlement on Hilton Head Island. Three five foot units and some standing tabby chimneys were noted.

Trinkley, Chicora Research Series 28, Archaeological Testing at the Stoney/Baynard Plantation, Hilton Head Island, Beaufort County, South Carolina, p. 16 (Source material noted in survey)

The 38BU806 portion of Drayton's Fish Haul Plantation slave row (38BU805 in 1986 Chicora work and in 1989 Brockington work), judged to be one of the most significant archaeological sites on Hilton Head. High degree of site integrity and archaeological remains in excellent state of preservation. Recommended as eligible for National Register of Historic Places. Barker Field is about ten acres county owned and operated, managed by Beaufort County Recreation Department.

  • Trinkley, Chicora Research Series 17, Archaeological Survey of the Barker Field Expansion Project, Hilton Head Island, Beaufort County, South Carolina (Source material listed in survey)

Colonel John Barnwell received a Royal Grant for 500 acres on December 10, 1717. He named it Fish Haul. His son, John, and wife, Martha, sold it to Edward Ellis, October 24, 1760. In 1838 Thomas F. Drayton married Mary Baynard Pope and they resided with her mother, Mary Baynard Pope, at Fish Haul. (father was John Edward Pope) When Mary died in 1856, Thomas was named administrator of her estate and operated Fish Haul in trust for seven minor Drayton children.

The 1860 slave census shows 52 slaves on Fish Haul. The Agricultural census of 1860 shows 250 improved acres, 450 unimproved, valued at $10,000. Absence of farm animals on the list indicates strongly oriented cotton plantation. Grain and food were raised for local use.

In the 1863 tax sales the property was sold to the Federal government for $3,000. The listing of 1300 acres suggests the combining of Fish Haul and the adjacent Pinelands Plantation. Drayton is recorded as providing "substantial slave quarters in good condition" and the main house as "lordly". Photographs from 1862 substantiate these statements.

In 1862 about 200 acres was used to create the freedmen’s village of Mitchelville.

Fish Haul was rented to Bacchus Singleton, in trust for himself and those living on the land who paid their part of the rent of $220 in 1862. The rental was subject to military occupation and half of the mansion house was held for a school. Certain restrictions applied such as only half of the arable land could be cultivated in any given year - the other half being fallow. The government could take a lien on the crop guaranteeing payment of rent, no one living on the property could be forced off, all work was shared equally and no one could live in the mansion house.

In 1867 the plantation was home to 120 blacks. The rent was $90.

By 1868 the land was rented to Summer Christopher. In 1871 the rental was $140 and no longer "in trust". After 1871 the land was no longer rented.

On April 17, 1875 the heirs of Mary Baynard Pope paid $407.83 for about 1300 acres including Pineland tract and the village of Mitchelville. Approximately 803 acres on Hilton Head Point south and east of Fish Haul Creek were retained by the Federal government for a military reservation. (Coggins Point). Wishing to sell the property the Draytons (heirs of Mary Baynard Pope) offered to donate some lots for 'church purposes'. They authorized their attorneys to establish a cemetery on Fish Haul and to give plots to those who would move their dead from the burial site near the mansion house. This seems not to have succeeded.

On December 9, 1876, 147.5 acres was sold to Robert McIntire who in turn sold it to Gabriel Gardner on February 20, 1878. On August 20, 1888 Gardner sold 650 acres (included the Gardner Plantation) to Summer Christopher, et. al.. The heirs of Christopher sold the ten acre parcel containing the Fish Haul Slave Row to Fred Owens, Jr. in 1894.

By 1920 the main house had disappeared. He held the property until it was sold in 1965 to the Hilton Head Company. From there it went to the Port Royal Plantation Group and then to Palmetto Dunes.

In 1978 the Hilton Head Gators acquired 7.4 acres from Palmetto Dunes. In 1980 the Beaufort County Recreation Commission took over the property.

In 1989 the site contains at least six structures. Above ground each building is marked by a tabby chimney base. The tabby used is a distinct mix containing whole clam shell in addition to the normal oyster shell aggregate. Broken brick, glass and ceramics are also spotted in the tabby. The mix provides a well compacted, dense and strong material.

"The project area is situated on a portion of what is traditionally known as Fish Haul Plantation. A typical cotton producing plantation in the antebellum period, Fish Haul and all of Hilton Head became victims of war. Union forces took over the island in 1861, used the Fish Haul main house as a home for the commanding general, camped troops, built sawmills and logged the property, and on the project tract constructed a freedman village (Mitchelville) and an earthwork fort (Fort Howell).

. in 1717 John Barnwell received a grant on the northwest corner of the island. Trinkley cites several sources. that the grant was for 500 acres and was described as Fish Haul in a 1760 sale to Edward Ellis. Both Holmgren and Peeples contribute colonial ownership of Fish Haul to Samuel Green and thence to his daughter Sarah Green Tucker. William Pope was the widower of Sarah Green Tucker Pope in 1798. Confederate General Thomas Drayton was managing Fish Haul in trust for his children, the heirs of Mary B. Pope, when the Civil War began.


Drayton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

We can do a genealogical research. Find out the exact history of your family!

Alberic “Sanglier” de Vere

Surname Name Meaning, Origin, and Etymology
This Anglo-Saxon last name is a locational/habitational one meaning “of Drayon”, from about sixteen different parishes and dioceses with this name across England (ex. Crockford, Bath, Wells, Norwich, Oxford, Peterborough, Lichfield, Southwell, London, and Ely). The name derives from the Old English word draeg or droeg, meaning drag, slipway, portage, or sledge (an area where boats/ships were pulled across land or dragged on wet ground) or the word dragan, meaning to draw or drag, and the word tun, meaning settlement, enclosure, or farm. Another source claims it referred to a farm along which heavy goods and products were dragged. One of the earliest locales bearing this name was Dreyton in Devon. The family first became prominent in Norfolk, England before the Norman Invasion of 1066 AD. The family became a prominent political family in South Carolina and owned a 464 acre plantation known as Magnolia Plantation and Gardens.

Spelling Variations
Common spelling variants or names with similar etymologies include Draytone, Draghton, Dreyton, Dradon, Draydon, and Draton.

Popularity & Geographic Distribution
The last name ranks Drayton ranks 4,670 th in popularity in terms in the United Status as of the 2000 Census. The name ranks particularly high in the following seven states: South Carolina, Georgia, New Jersey, and Arizona. The surname is also common in England, where it ranks 4,258 th . It ranks highest in the following counties: Lincolnshire, Shropshire, and Somerset. The name is common throughout the English speaking world: Scotland (38,841 st ), Wales (9,097 th ), Ireland (31,207 th ), Canada (16,224 th ), New Zealand (3,074 th ), Australia (2,855 th ), and South Africa (20,379 th ).

Hedingham Castle

Early Bearers of the Surname
The Hundred Rolls of 1273 AD, a census of Wales and England, known in Latin as Rotuli Hundredorum lists two bearers of this surname: Matila de Drayton in county Cambridgeshire and Beatrix de Draytone in county Huntingdonshire.The Testa de Neville lists one Simon de Drayton in county Warwick living during the reign of King Henry III (1216-1272) and King Edward I (1272-1307) of England. The History of Norfolk records one Richard de Drayton was bailiff of Yamouth in 1284 AD. The Poll Tax of Yorkshire in 1379 AD lists three bearers of this last name: Johannes de Drayton, Willelmus de Draghton, and Robertus de Draghton. An early marriage involving this surname was William Drayton to Margaret Topley at St. James Clerkenwell in London in 1576 AD.

History, Genealogy, and Ancestry
The earliest known ancestor from which the Drayton family descends was Alphonsus de Vere, also known as Comte de Guines, who was born between 965 and 1025 AD. He had a son named Alberic. His son Sheriff Alberic “Sanglier” de Vere, Sheriff of Berkshire, was born in 1030 AD in Ver, Manche, Normandy, France. He married Beatrice de Vere and moved to England. He had issue, including a son named Aubrey. His son Aubrey Alberic de Vere II, known by several names and titles, such as 1 st Earl of Ocofrd, Sheriff of London and Middle Sex, Lord of Hedingham Castle, and Lord Great Chamberlain of England, was born in 1062 AD in Hedingham, Essex, England. He married Adeliza FitzGilbert de Vere and had issue with her, including a son named Robert. His son Sir Robert de Vere, lord of Twywell, also known as Robert de Vere of Addington and Drayton, was born in 1124 AD. He married Matidal de Furnell and had issue with her, including a son named Henry. Henry de Vere, Lord of Drayton & Adington Manors, was born in 1155 AD and he married Malida de Furnell and had a son with her named Walter. His son Sir Walter de Drayton married Hildeburga de Vere de Bosco and had a son with her named Henry. Sir Henry de Drayton was born in 1198 AD. He married Isabella Vere and had a son with her named Baldwin. His son Sir Baldwin de Drayton, or Baudoi de Drayton, was born in 1223 AD. He married Idonea de Gimeges and had a son named Sir John de Drayton. Sir John was born in 1254 AD in Drayton. Northamptonshire, England. He married Philippe d’Ardenne and had a son with her named Simon. Sir Simon de Drayton was born in 1283 AD in the same town and he married Margaret de Lindsay. He had two issue with her: John and Katherine Green. His son John (also spelled Johan) was born in 1317 AD and he married a woman named Christiana and had a son with her named Baldwin. His son Baldwin de Drayton was a Knight born in 1330 AD. He married a woman named Alice and had a son with her named John. John was born in 1365 and he married a woman named Margaret. They had a son together named John born in 1391 AD. He married a woman named Margaret and had two issue with her: John Drayton and William Dryden. His son John was born in 1355 in Strixton, England. He married a woman named Ann and had a son with her named William Dryden. William was born in 1425 AD and married a woman named Grace, with whom he had a son named Drayton Dryden, born in 1455.

Drayton House, built by Aubrey de Vere I

Roger Drayton was born in 1316 AD in England. He married Catherine de Wolerton and had a daughter with his named Margaret. Margaret was born in 1341 and married John Worlych, with whom she had a daughter named Emma, who married James Moore.

Thomas Drayton Sr. is Atherston, Warwickshire, in England. He married Elizabeth Carpenter and had a son with her named Thomas Jr. prior to his death in the Barbados in 1702. His son Thomas Jr. was born in 1650 and he married Ann Fox. They had four children together: Thomas, Mary (Fuller), Stephen Fox, and John Sr. His son Thomas Drayton III was born in Magnolia Plantation in Charleston, South Carolina in 1700. He married Elizabeth Bull and Mary MacKenzie and had children: William Sr., Mary, Stephen, Henrietta Charlotte, John, and Thomas. His son Lt. Colonel Stephen Drayton was born in St. Andrew’s Parish, South Carolina in 1736. His son Judge William Drayton St. was born in the same locale in 1732.

John Drayton was born in Barrington, Sometset in 1656. He married Joan Rush and had three issue with her: Joan (Stower), John, and Henry. Henry was born in the same town in 1681. He married Joan Hixt and had the following children with her: John, Tristram, Joan (Doble), Henry, Alice, and Ann. His son Henry was born in 1716 in the same town and he married Mary Rouswell. They had the following children together: Edward, Betty (Taylor), Mary (Dade), Henry, Samuel, Ann (Bishop), William, John, Alice (Pittard), and William. His son Edward was born in the same town in 1743. He married Joan Rush and had five children with her: Henry, Mary, William, John, and Edward. His son Edward was born in 1780 in Somerset, England and he had numerous issue with her: Joan (Male), Nancy, Ann, Betty, William, Edmund, John, Henry, Mary (Barrett), and Samuel. His son Henry Drayton was born in the same town in 1817 and he married Jane Paul in 1840. He later went to Australia. He had the following children: Samuel Henry, Hester Ellen Broughton, William, George Edward, Mary Ellen, John Thomas, Henry Albert, and Charlotte. His son John Thomas was born in 1859 in Richmond, New South Wales, Australia, and he married Mary Ann Baker in 1882. He passed away in 1926.

built by Thomas Drayton Jr. c. 1670

John Drayton was born in Drayton, Somerset, England in 1600. He went to Virginia where he married Elizabeth Bishopp. He had one daughter with her named Judith, who married William Peebles.

Early American and New World Settlers
The book Genealogical Guide to the Early Settlers, mentions five people bearing this surname: 1) Henry Drayton of Marshield, “able to bear arms”, in 1643, and 2) John Drayton of Maine in 1642. Other early settlers in colonial America include Thomas Drayton (North Carolina 1671). Anne Drayton went to the Barbados in 1654. A one Thomas Drayton and his servants went to the Barbados in 1680. William and Priscilla Drayton went to Adelaide, Australia aboard the Diadem in 1840.

Grantees
We have 12 coats of arms for the Drew or Drewe surname depicted here. These 12 blazons are from Bernard Burke’s book The General Armory of England, Ireland, and Scotland, which was published in 1848. The bottom of this page contains the blazons, and in many instances contains some historical, geographical, and genealogical about where coat of arms was found and who bore it.

William Henry Drayton

Fenwick Hall Plantation

Written in 1921:
Hon. John Fenwick did not record the date or manner of his immigration to America. The moving cause of his coming may have well been a summons from his brother, Robert. There has survived a land 'warrant' issued to John Fenwicke of the date March 1, 1704/5 for 500 acres of land on Sandtee River adjoing another tract which he then already owned and it was in the summer of 1706 that, having then been established in the colony long enough to have become a Captain of militia, he there had his crowded hour.

History of Fenwick Hall
(Shortest version of a long History?)

1703 - John Fenwick(e), youngest son of Robert, immigrates to Carolina from England and serves as Commissioner of the Indian Tract. Marries Elizabeth Gibbes (born 2.4.1691) , daughter of Governor (and Chief Justice) Robert Gibbes of a Devonshire family, who came early to Carolina from Barbadoes. Gibbes conveys much of his land on Johns Island to Fenwick.
1720 - Indians are Fenwick's Johns Island neighbors when he builds a house of notched logs. Possible previous Fort. This fort becomes the tall basement of the manor house.
1730/1738 - John Fenwick, from builds the rectangular main section of the manor house on top of notch logs/fort on John's Island facing the Stono River.
1747- Edward Fenwick Sr ,Esq, (Lord Ripon) inherits his father's John multiple plantations and 11,000 acres and propertys downtown Charles towne. Edward Sr first marries Martha Izard, daughter of Ralph Izard of "The Elms, Goose Creek. Martha dies and Edward Sr then remarried to Mary Drayton, daughter of Thomas Drayton of "Magnolia" on the Ashley River. Edward Sr travels through Europe, selecting thoroughbred horses for his Johns Island Stud Farm at Fenwick Hall. Edward builds the coach house and a impressive separate brick stable for his horses. A three-mile (some claim 3 1/2 mile) race track is built from what is now the intersection of Maybank and River roads to Christ Church on Maybank. Fenwick's children live in a mansion of brick surrounded by white and black servants, stables, barns, a coach house and cleared fields- a testament to the family's wealth and social standing. Legend has it that Fenwick's daughter elopes with an Irish coachman and is caught the next day with her groom. Fenwick orders his daughter to whip into motion a horse that supports her lover, who hangs from a noose.The daughter's ghost still roams the house, calling her lover's name: "Tony, Tony, Tony."A different version of the legend is told today on Johns Island. The groom was beheaded by the noose and on full moons rides through the marsh searching for his lover. Some swear to have seen the Headless Horseman of Fenwick.
1753 - Edward Fenwick Jr. "Ned" Eldest son of Edward Sr inherits and revives for ten more years (1777-1788) the John's Island Stud his father began. December 1774 Edward Jr mets and secretly marrys his german cousin, daughter of John Stuart, H.M. Superintendant of Indian Affairs for the Southern Department, over his fathers well documented opposal.
1779- As word spreads of the British invasion of Charleston, Edward's sons, Edward, Jr. and Thomas, shockingly defect to the British. Edward Jr. and Thomas join the British forces, who take Fenwick Hall. The British have to protect them from their neighbors. American Patriots accept a dinner invitation to Fenwick Hall. Edward Fenwick Jr reports on their strength to the British, who surround the Americans. The Americans lay down their arms. The British bayonet them, killing or wounding almost every man.After the war, Thomas flees to Jamaica with a large number of his father's slaves and is never heard from again. Edward Jr. is portrayed as a Patriot spy by his supporters and eventually is accepted by his neighbors. Due to Fenwick family litigation, Edward Jr must sell the Stono River plantation and departs Fenwick Hall and moves to Edisto to continue the horse breeding tradition of the British Fenwicks. Ned dies on a Friday, in the fall of 1800, at only the age of 46 of a confirmed dropsy.
The Fenwick plantation is bought at auction by the Gibbes family. John Gibbes is then thought to have added the octagonal wing to Fenwick Hall and possibly the portico and roof ballastrade around 1800, just before his death.
1782 -January 15, (Revolutionary War) Lt Colonel Laurens captures stragglers at abandoned British Camp (Fenwick Hall). Also, Laurens exchanges gunfire with a British schooner on the Stono River, presumably near Fenwick Hall & Gibbes Planatation.
1803 - John Gibbes dies. Fenwick is sold to Joseph Jenkins,
1810 (1806)
- Robert Brown buys it from Joseph and Elizabeth Jenkins on May 9, 1810. William Seabrook, Esq, handles the transaction.
1817 -? Eleven years later, planter, Benjamin Reynolds, purchases the 2,475 acre track for $20,000.00. State Senator 1818-1826. St Johns Vestry 1812-1825. Married Sarah Toomer.
Pre-1838 - Benjamin F. Scott purchases the plantation.
5.29.1838 William Snowden, Martha and Justus Angel purchased Head Quarters PLantation.
2.10.1840 - After succession of owners, Dr Daniel Jenkins Townsend , a planter on Edisto, buys Fenwick. During the Civil War, Fenwick Hall was used by both the Union and the Confederacy as a field hospital. Its usefulness to the Union probably saved it from being burned.When the Townsends return after the war, the plantation's farmland is in ruins.The land is leased for farming. Townsend was born 5.29.1807 at Bleak Hall Plantation, Edisto Island, SC and died 7.29.1885 at Rockville, Wadalaw Island, SC. Three of their children are born at Fenwick Hall (Susan Mary Townsend, Elizabeth Amarinthia Townsend, & James Swinton Townsend). Dr Jenkins lived at Fenwick during the winter and summered in the Village of Rockville,. He built a church there with the help of two of his slaves who were highly skilled apprenticed carpenters in Charleston. The small white church (Rockville Presbyterian Church) was built about 11 feet off the ground in the style of the homes of Rockville, with pillars made of tabby, a mixture of shell and lime. Orginally there was a tall steeple, but it crashed to the ground in the great hurricane of 1893. During the civil was the steeple was used as a lookout from which to observe Federal gunboats in the North Edisto River.
Pre-1867 - Daniel H. Townsend owns Fenwick.
12.20.1867 - John Henry Townsend also owns Brick House Plantation.
12.11.1876 - Thomas F.H. Peck then owns Fenwick.
02.1900 - Martha Peck.
1910 . John Limehouse leases and opens on Fenwick farmland that becomes famous for pork sausage.
10.5.1912 Henry B. Whilden now owns Fenwick and it is called " Fenwick Castle " and "very old historic house". Home is boarded up and sits deserted. The land continues to be used for farming.
Late 1920's -1930 - Victor Morawetz and his second wife, Marjorie, of New York City, buys and restores the badly deteriorated plantation house with his wife. He dies in 1938. They grow unique and rare cacti in their garden with many blooming variety. Many of these cacti grow 25' high in the garden. At that time, the plantation is calleld 'Fenwick Castle'. Morawetz was a wealthy NY City lawyer known for his astute dealings with railroads and corporations. They also owned the "Pirate House' in historic Charleston. The Charleston "Pink House", 17 Chalmers St, Constructed circa 1712 was also restored by the Morawetz in the 1930's. Driving to Fenwick from Charleston via James Island, you will drive through a alley of Magnolia trees at the golf course. Victor Morawtez planted these trees during the time he and his wife restored Fenwick. The magnolia trees are still there today and make the drive to Fenwick Hall a pleasant outing.
1931 , April-Historic American Building Survey completed on the plantation and accepted into Library of Congress (while under Morawetz ownership).
12.27. 1943 The plantation is sold to Helen (Nellie) Igoe Blanchard and is called "Fenwick Hall Plantation". The Blanchards move in! Plantation is down to 1,332 acres.
1958 -" The Legend of Fenwick Hall" overture is played by The National Symhony Orchestra in Washington, D.C. It was directed and written by the Blanchard's son, Robert Igoe Blanchard. Bob wrote the overture as his graduate thesis for his master's degree. Blanchards--can we get a copy of the music?
1972 - February 23- Plantation is accepted to the National Registry for Historic Places while under the Blanchard's ownership.
1975 - Helen Igoe and Claude Wright Blanchard Sr , a Charleston County contractor, put the 1,200-acre Fenwick estate on the market for $xxx million. Anyone have a copy of the brochure that was used to advertise the plantation? I lost my copy over the years! Bummer.
4.27. 1978 - No buyers for the complete plantation. The plantation is then partitioned, and at least one tract sold to private developers. Fenwick Acres Partnership purchases Tract B which includes the manor house and then leases to Fenwick Hospital.
1978 - Blanchards sell Fenwick Hall and relocate. Blanchard children inherit portions of the partioned plantation minus the main house and two Oak Allees'.
1980 - Fenwick Hall Hospital, a private alcohol and drug abuse counseling center, begins operation on the smaller 55 acre estate. Only the elite can initally afford to stay at this clinic which resembles a high end health spa. The main house is damaged due to installation of fire supression equipment and commercial kitchens. Holes are drilled recklessly into the original aged paneling. Hand painted mural in the 'great room' from 1931 is painted over. Old historic doors are spray painted with black paint and stencels to note patient's room numbers.
1985 - Fenwick Hall Plantation is annexed into the city of Charleston and zoned for development. (yikes! Imagine the taxes!)
1990 - Fenwick Hall Hospital- Rates were as high as $14,000 per month. Many well known 'patients' visit, such as former Washington D.C. Mayor, Marion Barry (& body guards). Former Dodgers pitcher, Don Newcombe was also a patient along with John Drew, NBA Star with the Atlanta Hawks. A second mayor chose the 'hall' for recovery-former Ft Lauderdale mayor Charles Lowery recovered here.
The Washington Post Newspaper calls Fenwick a "pricey, luxurious, exclusive center". The Chronicle Telegram newspaper (Elyria,Ohio) 7.5.1981 article states "Alcoholism center caters to execs at top" with its heated swimming pool, exercise room, whirlpool, sauna and locker area. A tennis & basketball court is a stone's throw away. The staff included three physicians, a dozen nurses, consultants, counselors, social workers and recreational therapist. The clientele has included some nationally known sports, entertainment and businesss figures whose identities the hospital guards unless they decide to go public". Programs included "Art Therapy". Multiple free standing buildings for the hospital are built on the estate called a 'colonial farm campus' by the architect.
1995 - Fenwick Hospital closes. Charter medical Corp closes the 49-bed rehabiliatation center. Plantation sits abandoned
except for the security guard and ghost for almost five years. Main house suffers from neglect including water damage.
2000 - Newest Owners/Caretakers! Even though the property is advertised for sale world wide by Colliers Kennans Real Estate, a local couple, xxx and xxx buy the Fenwick and the 55-acre tract around it, which they plan to restore and reside in. There was interest from London and the Cathoic Church for a time considered Fenwick Hall as a residence for retired priests. (Aiken County/South Carolina News 11/11/2000). Fenwick Hall research and restoration begins and the plantation comes back to life!
And with the plantations new life, it is now called, lovingly, "Fenico".
2001 -Developers propose & construct several hundred housing units on the original plantation property overlooking the main house & drive. Legal battles ensue as the developers do not follow legal agreements and impact what is left of the plantation significantly. Every other street on the island is named after something to do with fenwick--overkill. Charleston BY-PASS may be constructed and pass right thru the Fenwick Hall platation. Can it get any worse for Fenwick? Yep, global warming with a rise in the tides. Many surrounding subdivisions on the former plantation grounds go 'belly up' before completion.

TODAY:
Restoration on the property continues including the various buildings, landscaping and saving the huge old oaks.
The City of Charleston can't wait to destroy one of the two Fenwick Hall Plantation's Oak Allees! The city plans to cut a roadway (new Penny's Creek Road) by clearing the OaK Allee that flanks the Twelve Oaks Condos .

January 3, 2018. Rare snowfall blankets Fenwick for days.

Sources
: Cultural Resources Study of Fenwick Tract D, Ralph Bailey, Brockington and Associates Post and Courier articles Aiken County/South Carolina News Chronicle Telegram 7.5.1981 Elyria, Ohio Jonathan Poston, director of preservation programs, Historic Charleston Foundation The History of Beaufort County, Lawrence S. Rowland City of Charleston Richard Kerr, John's Island Stud, Helena Igoe Blanchard McKay-Vivona, Martha Aldridge, Harry Campbell Vaiden III.

1730 he builds major portion of Fenwick Hall.

John was of noble British origin and the Fenwick family was known as a very old family and of immense belongings. John married Elizabeth Gibbes b 4 Feb, 1691, daughter of Governor Robert Gibbes of S.Carolina.

1721 Colonel John Fenwicke was appointed an Associate Justice.
1730 he was appointed a member of His Majesty's Council in S.Carolina.
June 1740 Colonel Fenwick was promoted to rank of Major-General and of the appointment of Colonel Charles Pickney to the command of his regiment.

John Fenwick's eldest son inherits Fenwick Place:
Honorable Edward Culcheth Fenwick, Sr, Esq.,
(The "Lord Ripon") and 2nd wife, Mary Drayton Fenwick.
Edward b 1720-1775
Inherits the plantation.
(d) July 7, 1775

Images of Hon. Edward Fenwick Sr and Mary Drayton Fenwick are copies
of miniature paintings behind glass. These images were graciously
provided by their descendant,
Mr Andrew Jones.
I thank Mr Jones for sharing these important historical paintings.

Edward Fenwick Sr. was the founder of the John's Island Stud.
He built the impressive Coach House and matching Stable and private race track. He is one of the few directly responsible for the bloodline that we know as the American Thoroughbred Horse.

Edward Sr Wives:
1. Martha Izard , daughter of Hon. Ralph Izard. Edward Sr and Martha had one daughter, Elizabeth Fenwick.
2. Mary Drayton b 21 Dec 1734, (yes, of Drayton Hall) married Edward Sr on Feb 27, 1753, who was the daughter of Thomas Drayton & Elizabeth Bull. Mary marries John DeBrahm after Edward Sr's death.
Mary and Edward Sr had a whopping 15 children who are listed below.

1. Edward Fenwick Jr, b. 12 Dec 1753. (Spy and Traitor-assisted Capt John Stuarts wife and daughter on Feb 3, 1776). Married Christiana (b 1752) Stuart.
2. John Fenwick, b 12 Aug 1755
3. Sarah Fenwick, b 3 Dec 1756 (married Feb 1777, Macartan Campbell)
4. Mary Fenwick, b 7 Jan 1757 (married Nov 1779, Walter Izard, son of Ralph Izard)
5. Colonel Thomas Fenwick (of British Militia), b 19 Dec 1758 (Spy and Traitor-guided British in their attack on Capt Matthews and Barnwell on John's Island in 1779)
6. Martha Fenwick, b 15 Jan 1760 (married Oct 15,1778, Thomas Gadsden, Captain in 1st Regiment SC Continentals)
7. Robert Fenwick, b 16 Mar 1761
8. Charlotte Elizabeth Fenwick, b 4 Nov 1762
9. Selina Fenwick, b 18 Apr 1762 (unmarried as of 1805)
10. Robert William Fenwick, b 16 May 1765 (died before 1785?)
11. Charlotte Fenwick, b 21 July 1766 (married 1st: Willaim Leigh Pierce, Captain on staff of Gen.Greene. 2nd husband was Ebenezer Jackson)
12. Matilda Fenwick, b 12 Dec 1767 (possibly married Robert Giles-no children)
13. Harriette Fenwick, b Mar 1769 (married Josiah Tattnall, Jr in 1786, Governor).
14. George Fenwick, b 5 Jan 1771 (died before 1785?)
15. Brevet Brig. General John Roger Fenwick, b 13 Jan 1773 (never married/no children). Died Mar 1842.

(Majority of the children obtained an proper education in England.)


Honorable Edward Culcheth Fenwick, Sr, Esq Dies.
The "Lord Ripon" dies July 7, 1775
1720-1775
<--- Obituary

Click on the obit left to enlarge.

Edward Fenwick, Jr,
Becomes a 'man without a country' due to his deeds.
Eldest son of Edward Fenwick, Sr.
1753-1800

Edward Jr.. attempted to continue his father's horse breeding and like his father, he did import high blood horses.
Edward Jr was a British 'Loyalist' & 'Tory' and betrayed both Americans and Britian and along with his traitor brother, Thomas Fenwick. Both were weak in character.

Col. Edward Fenwick , from Charleston County.

Initally a captain, Fenwick as lieutenant colonel commanded a unit of loyalist dragoos from out Charleston in
early 1781. In April, he managed to route Harden at nearby Fort Balfour. He and a number of his men were
exchanged, and in the latter part of July reappeared in the field. Thereafter Fenwick and his troops continued
to act as a patrol outside Charleston. Joseph Johnson says he was twice a traitor, first to Americans, later to British, and supplied Greene with information, and for which, like Andrew Williamson, his property was later spared confiscation by the 'rebels'. In the end, Edward Fenwick Jr was the classic example of a 'man without a country' .
had all his property confiscated by the "Confiscation Act of 1782".Three years later. by a special "Act of Assembly" (just for him!) on March 24, 1785, Edward Jr's property was restored to him but he was required to leave the state within a year.
He was also subject to the internal family litigiation from his siblings that led him to attempt to sell the Fenwick Plantation, which in the end, family relative and neighbor, John Gibbes purchases.


<---Obituary
September 13, 1800.
Died at 46 years.

Charlotte Fenwick
b July 21, 1766
Sister to John Roger and Edward Jr and 12 others.

Charlotte first married William Leigh Pierce. Pierce was from Virginia and they settled in Georgia. Soon after the Revoluntion, in 1787, he sat as a delegate from the state to the Convention that framed the Constitution of the United States.

Charlotte Fenwick's 2nd husband was Ebenezer Jackson of Massachusetts. He was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant of 3rd Continental Artillery on June 27, 1781 where he served until Nov 3, 1783. Mrs Charlotte Jackson's daughter, Harriet Jackson, became in 1821 the wife of Commodore Tattnall, her first cousin.

Who was Charlotte Fenwick? Here are exerpts of a letter written to her soon-to-be husband from a friend, describing her on July 10, 1783:

Dear Major Pierce,
Last evening for the first time in my life I saw Miss Charlotte Fenwick. She sang "Return Enraptured Hours" most divinely. She is rather pretty than handsome. She is lively, facitious and I think abonimably clever. The whole town says you are engaged to her-it is taken for granted-and now you are ranked on the list of a Northern Gentleman marrying a Southern Lady.

BRIGADIER GENERAL JOHN ROGER FENWICK
1773-1842

The last Fenwick male.
John Roger Fenwick's photo is only the second photograph of
a Fenwick I have been able to locate. John Roger was the "last' of the male line of Fenwick Hall Fenwicks had no children. Born at Fenwick Hall, John Roger Fenwick was the youngest son of Edward Sr and had the good fortune to be born too late to become broiled in the political battles of his older siblings (Edward Jr & Thomas). 1799 John Roger Fenwick was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps and he was regulary promoted. 1809 he became Captain. In December of 1811, John Roger resigned from the Marines in order to transfer to the Army.
He was severly wounded and made prisoner at the Battle of Queenstown Heights, 13th October 1812 in the War of 1812.
March 1813 he was brevetted Colonel for "gallant conduct" on the Nigara frontier, and was on the same date appointed Adjutant General of the Army, with the rank of Colonel. John Roger Fenwick was disbanded with the rank of Colonel in June 1815, but retained in the Army as Lieutenant Colonel of Light Artillery. He was commissioned Colonel of the 4th artillery in May 1822.

The 18th of March, 1823 he became 'Brigadier General, U.S.A. and in that rank, ended an honourable professional career. He was well like by both President Madison and M.Van Buren. John ended his career as Counsel for the USA to France and spent his remaining years there in Paris. He had no wife, no children.

On the death of General John Roger Fenwick in 1842, the 'tail male' of the Carolina Fenwicks was broken. Their tradition has since been maintained only by descendants of the General Fenwick's sisters.

John Gibbes
Fenwick's were neighbors & cousins with the Gibbes.
John Gibbes purchased Fenwick Hall Plantation from Edward Fenwick Jr as a forced sale due to 'internal' Fenwick Family Litigation. (Edward's brothers and sisters wanted their part of inheritance from Edward Fenwick Sr's estate.)

Some authorities ruminate that Edward Fenwick Sr added the octagonal wing on the manor house for his second bride at the same time he built the coach house and stables. Others claim that John Gibbes added the wing & roof-top balustrade upon his purchase of the property.

Joseph & Elizabeth Jenkins
?
purchases plantation from John Gibbes.

Robert Brown
Sells !
1810, October 17
Charleston City Gazette Newspaper
The subscriber offers for sale his Plantation, situation on John's Island, and in sight of Charleston, from which by water, it is a distant about six miles and by land, over the Ashley River Bridge, probably, not more than three or four. It possesses a very extensive front on Stono River, on which it has several good landings. It has an abundance of oak, and pine wood on the margin of the river, which, from its local situation, may be easily transported to market. It contains within its own bounds an excellent range of stock, an article of considerable profit and ready sale. This track contains by old survey 2,000 acres, and consist of cotton, corn and rice, pine and high black-rush land. The cotton and rice lands are of excellent quality the rush bowls may be easily embanked, and converted into the first quality cotton land, the bottom being blue clay.

There are on the premises an exceeding good Dwelling House, containing thirteen upright Rooms, a large kitchen and stable, all built of bricks a machine house, cotton house, & c. The grounds around the building elegantly laid out but a further description is deemed superfluous, as any person desirous of becomming a purchases will, of course, view the premises.

The terms and other particulars will be made known by applying, directly on the premises, to the subscriber, or through the medium of Messrs. Rhodes & Otis Factors, Charleston
Robert Brown, john's island, October 27

Dr Daniel Jenkins Townsend
James Swinton Townsend (b9.16.1848, d12.16.1887), son of Fenwick Hall owner (1840) , Dr Daniel Jenkins Townsend, was born at Fenwick Hall on September 16, 1848. He married Mary Amarinthea Jenkins Townsend in 1871 and had ten (10) children. Daniel Townsend left his son much of the Rockland Plantation which they had farmed together.

Also born at Fenwick was two of James Swinton's younger sisters:
b1845 d1863 Susan Mary Townsend
b1847 d1876 Elizabeth Amarinthia Townsend

Photo courtesy of Jean Townsend.

Today Limehouse descendants continue to sell some of the finest local produce grown and sold in the Lowcountry.

Former owner and restorer of Fenwick, Mr Victor Morawetz , New York Attorney, was also the architect of one of the most admired railroad turnarounds in history .

Victor and his (2nd) wife Margorie Nott Morawetz , (northern cultural philantropist) restored Fenwick from ruins in the 1930's. He died in 1938. In addition to preserving and restoring several noteable properties in Charleston, including the Haig House at 30 Meeting Street and the Smythe House at 14

16 Lejare St and the Pink House. In the early part of the 19th century, the Pink House deteriorated and was not really repaired until the 1930's when the Morawetz took an interest. It is during its restoration that the small wing on the southeast corner was added, as space in which caterers could work, since the Morawetz used the building strictly as a place to entertain. This wing now houses the teal print room and office space. The Morawetz's hired Architects Albert Simons & his partner Samuel Lapham Jr for the restoration and additions to Fenwick Hall.

Margorie was active in Charleston's restoration and believed it was to Charleston's advantage to erase visible traces of its Victorian past by 'bringing out its (older) 18th century beauty, as much of which is hidden and to 'scrape' off gingerbread ornaments, etc.

Even though considered New Yorkers (part of the swarm of Yankees), the Morawtez's were considered for membership in the St. Cecilia Society, the hallmark of "belonging' in the elite white Charleston society.

One note of interest, during 1927, a private SPS Performance (Society for the Preservation of Negro Spirituals) was held at Fenwick HAll which internationally renowed composer and music critic Walter Damrosch attended. The SPS goal was to protect and preserve African American Spirituals that were sung during the slavery days in the lowcountry. Usually there was a group of 20 or so singers. During January 1930, the SPS sang at the Thursday Evening Club in N.York in front of a "proper New York audience" at the request of the Morawetz. Marjorie described the club's membership as "conservative, cultivated and representative-perhaps a little more of the past than the present". It was said an evening of exchange between like-minded elite individuals was sure to result. (Get the drift?)

Morawetz's benefices to Charleston include the land on which the municipal golf course was built and the bordering avenue of Magnolias along the Maybank Highway. One million dollars given to the South Carolina Medical Society, a wing for the Roper Hospital for the treatment of black patients with contageous diseases, contributions to the Material Welfare Clinic, and much of SeaBrook Island to the Episcopal Church with the understanding that its nature beauty be maintained. Their latter wishes were not honored as the Church sold off much of Seabrook for money.

The Morawetz's also donated funds to the Gibbes Museum in Charleston that was used for museum purchases. They also gave the museum 18th century miniature paintings.

At the time of his death in Charleston, Victor and Marjorie maintained a residence in N.York at 39 East SeventyNinth Street.

Mrs Marjorie Knott Morawetz tried to help the new owner save "Brick House Plantation", Edisto, in the 1930's, but the cost to restore the house was too great, and it was torn down in the 1950's. Mrs Victor Morawetz had an iron-rail fence installed a around the Stanyarne family cemetery to protect it. The graveyard is all that is left of the Brick House Plantation that once grew sea-island, long-staple cotton.

1947-1956 Marge was a Trustee with the "Historic Charleston Foundation" and since 1956 Marjorie has been an "Honorary Trustee".


The J. Paul Getty Museum

This image is available for download, without charge, under the Getty's Open Content Program.

Slaves of General Thomas F. Drayton

Henry P. Moore (American, 1835 - 1911) 13 × 20.8 cm (5 1/8 × 8 3/16 in.) 84.XM.483.25

Open Content images tend to be large in file-size. To avoid potential data charges from your carrier, we recommend making sure your device is connected to a Wi-Fi network before downloading.

Not currently on view

Object Details

Title:

Slaves of General Thomas F. Drayton

Artist/Maker:
Culture:
Place:

Hilton Head, South Carolina, United States (Place Created)

Medium:
Object Number:
Dimensions:

13 × 20.8 cm (5 1/8 × 8 3/16 in.)

Mark(s):

(Recto, mount): yellow paper label imprinted in black ink, affixed at lower right corner: "Slaves of Rebel Gen. T.F. Drayton, / Hilton Head, S.C. / Photographed and For Sale by / H.P. Moore, Concord, N.H."

Inscription(s):

(Verso, mount) inscribed in pencil, at lower right corner: "H.P. Moore / C.W. [space] 75"

Department:
Classification:
Object Type:
Object Description

This photograph, depicting a large group of slaves, was taken by Henry P. Moore at Hilton Head, South Carolina on the seven-hundred-acre Fish Haul Plantation belonging to Thomas Fenwick Drayton. The plantation was largely dedicated to producing cotton, and fifty-two slaves worked and lived there. Moore's photographs from this period document slaves' living quarters and include images of workers ginning and sorting cotton. This image depicts slaves who were in the process of being freed by the federal government.

Provenance
Provenance

Samuel Wagstaff, Jr., American, 1921 - 1987, sold to the J. Paul Getty Museum, 1984.

Exhibitions
Exhibitions
Grave Testimony: Photographs of the Civil War (January 14 to March 29, 1992)
Hidden Witness: African Americans in Early Photography (February 28 to June 18, 1995)
In Focus: The Worker (November 3, 2009 to March 21, 2010)
The Thrill of the Chase: The Wagstaff Collection of Photographs at the J. Paul Getty Museum (March 15, 2016 to May 7, 2017)
  • The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center (Los Angeles), March 15 to July 31, 2016
  • Wadsworth Atheneum (Hartford), September 10 to December 11, 2016
  • Portland Museum of Art (Portland), February 13 to May 7, 2017
Bibliography
Bibliography

Martineau, Paul. The Thrill of the Chase: the Wagstaff collection of photographs at the J. Paul Getty Museum. (Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum, 2016), p. 92, pl. 41.

This information is published from the Museum's collection database. Updates and additions stemming from research and imaging activities are ongoing, with new content added each week. Help us improve our records by sharing your corrections or suggestions.

Please be advised that this database may include images and original language considered derogatory, offensive or graphic, and may not be suitable for all viewers. The images, titles, and inscriptions are products of their time and the creator’s perspective and are presented here as documentation, not a reflection of Getty’s values. Language and societal norms shift, and cataloging of a collection is a continuous work in progress. We encourage your input to enhance our understanding of our collection.

Every effort has been made to accurately determine the rights status of works and their images. Please contact Museum Rights and Reproductions if you have further information on the rights status of a work contrary or in addition to the information in our records.

/> The text on this page is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, unless otherwise noted. Images and other media are excluded.

The content on this page is available according to the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) specifications. You may view this object in Mirador – a IIIF-compatible viewer – by clicking on the IIIF icon below the main image, or by dragging the icon into an open IIIF viewer window.


Watch the video: Thomas finds lifes meaning. short 1 (January 2022).