Information

Fleet Air Arm Carrier Warfare, Kev Darling


Fleet Air Arm Carrier Warfare, Kev Darling

Fleet Air Arm Carrier Warfare, Kev Darling

The twentieth century saw the aircraft carrier replace the big-gun battleship as the most important capital ships in the world's navies. This book looks at the Fleet Air Arm and the long history of the British aircraft carrier. We start with a look at the development of carrier aviation towards the end of the First World War and in the inter-war period, a period that saw the Navy regain control of its aviation in 1937. This introduction also looks at the aircraft carriers used by the navy, and a selection of the most important aircraft to serve on them.

We then move on to a series of chapters that look at each theatre of the Second World War - the Atlantic (and Arctic), Mediterranean, Indian Ocean and Pacific - looking at the ships involved and the operations they took part in. This takes up about one third of the text, and is followed by almost as much material on the Korean War, which saw Fleet Air Arm involvement from the start to the end of the UN involvement in the war.

Darling then brings the story up to the present day, looking at the slow decline of the Fleet Air Arm before the Falklands War, the crucial part it played in that war, and the potential revival of true carrier aviation with the current generation of 'super-carriers' that are under construction (2010).

Darling is very good on matters of detail - which carriers were involved in which operation, and which squadrons or flights were operating from them. The career summaries for the escort carriers are particularly useful, provides some details I haven't seen elsewhere.

This is a useful book that provides a good overview of the entire history of the Fleet Air Arm, bring up-to-date a story that often ends in 1945, or with the Korean War.

Chapters
1 Aviation for the Navy From the Start to 1939
2 The Fleet Air Arm in the Atlantic
3 The Fleet Air Arm in the Mediterranean
4 Prosecuting the War in India and the Far East
5 Korea: the Seafire Interlude
6 Korea: the Sea Fury years
7 Sea Furies in Korean Skies
8 From Suez to the Falklands
9 From the Falklands to the Future

Author: Kev Darling
Pages: 350
Publisher: Pen & Sword Aviation
Year: 2009



Hawker Sea Fury Korean Operations

Originally an RAF fighter, the Fury contract was abandoned by the Air Force but pursued by the Admiralty as a Seafire replacement. ii The prototype flew on 21 February 1945. iii The carrier capable prototype flew in October 1945. iv Deck landing trials were carried out on HMS Ocean in August 1946. v

The Sea Fury F10 entered service in August 1947 with 807 Squadron, and the F11 with 802 Squadron in May 1948. vi The Sea Fury was operated by Fleet Air Arm (and RAN) squadrons 801, 802, 803, 804, 805, 806, 807, 808, 811, 871 and 898. vii During the Korean War, Sea Furies operated with squadron nos “802 (Ocean), 807 (Theseus), 801, 804 (Glory), 805 and 808 (Sydney). viii

Sea Fury FB 11, VX642 with ordinance display. Note the two 45 gallon drop tanks which increased the aircraft’s range from 700 to 1040 miles. ix

The aircraft was armed with 4 20mm Hispano Mk V cannons and could carry up to 2,000 lbs of ordinance (1,000 or 500 lb bombs) or 12 76mm (60 lb) rockets. x Empty, the aircraft weighed 9,240 lbs and fully loaded 12,500 lbs. Powered by a Bristol Centaurus XVIIC 18 cylinder twin-row radial engine developing 2,480 horsepower, the aircraft could make 460 mph (400 knots) and ascend to 10,900 meters. xi

The North Korean People’s Army forced the withdrawal of the Southern government from Seoul on 27 June 1950. Rear-Admiral Sir William G. Andrewes, aboard HMS Belfast, was operating with the carrier HMS Triumph in Japanese waters at the time and moved to respond. xiii Following the UN mandate for assistance to the Republic of Korea on 27 June the commonwealth forces of Australia, New Zealand and Canada joined with the United Kingdom and the United States as the major naval power in the region. xiv USN Vice-Admiral C. Turner Joy assumed overall command and placed Andrewes as commander Task Group 96.8, West Korea Support Group. xv Triumph joined Task Force 77, USN Pacific Fleet, along with USS Valley Forge under command of Rear-Admiral John M. Hoskins USN. xvi The first strikes were carried out on 3 July, and on 28 July the first FAA casualty was suffered when a Seafire from 800 (Triumph) Squadron was mistakenly shot down by a USAF B-29 xvii .

A flight of Fireflies and Sea Furies. xviii

The Sea Fury was first used to in combat to support Fairey Firelies on ASW patrols. HMS Theseus arrived in the Yellow Sea carrying 23 Furies and 12 Fireflies from 807 and 813 Squadrons and conducted its first patrols and strikes on 9 October 1950. xix The first Sea Fury strike involved six aircraft (and four Fireflies) carrying mixed ordinance of 500 lb bombs and rockets, led by Lt Cdr Stovin-Bradford against targets at Paengyong-do. xx That afternoon five Sea Furies and four Fireflies attacked the harbour at Chinnampo. xxi Loadouts favoured rockets as the weight of bombs necessitated higher steaming speeds than the Theseus was capable of attaining (21 knots with rockets, 28 with bombs). xxii

“ A raid in progress on warehouses on the waterfront at Chinnampo in North Korea by Fairey Firefly aircraft from HMS THESEUS.” xxiii

Day two on station, Theseus launched a strike against the Chang-you railway bridge, the flight consisting of Fireflies escorted by a pair of Furies and resulting in significant damage to the bridge. xxiv A simultaneous flight targeting the surrounding area resulted in the destruction of Sea Fury VW628, although the pilot, who ditched the aircraft successfully, was rescued by helicopter. xxv Deteriorating weather on the afternoon of 11 October forced Theseus to leave the area and refuel. Strikes were launched against the Chang-yong area later the following day. xxvi For the next several days attacks were made against targets in the Cinnampo area, including the harbour where the Sea Furies attacked Korean junks believed to be mine layers. xxvii After refuelling at Inchon, Theseus moved to the Sinanju-Chonju-Sonchon area of operations and sortied aircraft on 20 October to attack Chongju. xxviii

By mid-December Theseus‘s Sea Furies were attacking Pyongyang. Weather conditions worsened and snow was regularly cleared from the flight deck. xxx Despite the poor conditions, Sea Fury raids against communications (enemy trucks) were carried out near Chongchon river and the Hangju-Sariwon area. xxxi

Sea Fury VW546 aboard HMS Glory. xxxii

In 1951 Rear-Admiral Alan K. Scott-Moncrieff replaced Andrewes (promoted to Vice-Admiral). xxxiii HMS Glory replaced Theseus on 23 April 1951 and continued operations with the 14 th Carrier Air Group. Glory‘s arrival coincided with the beginning of the Chinese spring offensive. xxxiv Glory was relieved by HMAS Sydney in September 1951 and the latter flew 2,366 sorties over 43 flying days- interrupted by Typhoon Ruth. xxxv Glory returned in January 1952, and was relieved by Ocean in the summer. xxxvi

During these two tours, Glory‘s air group conducted 5000 sorties. xxxvii Between 1950 and 1953 the four Sea Fury equipped carriers were supported by HMS Unicorn which ferried fresh equipment from the fleet base at Singapore the 2,500 miles to the theatre of operations. xxxviii

HMS Theseus leaving Malta after the war in July 1953. xxxix

Some measure of the intensity of operations can be made by examining the sortie record of HMS Theseus from the beginning of hostilities to the end of March 1951. xl Between 9 October and 5 November 1950, Theseus‘s Furies (avg 19.3) made 492 sorties. From 5 December to 26 December, 423 Fury sorties were flown by an average of 19.6 aircraft. From 7 January 1951 to 23 March, 20.8 Furies flew 718 sorties, for a total of 1634 sorties over 98 days of operation (of which 65 were suitable for flying). All told, Theseus launched 3,500 sorties on 86 days during its seven month deployment. xli During the first six months, Theseus‘s air wing dropped 829,000 lbs of explosives and fired 7,317 rockets and “half a million rounds of 20mm ammunition.” xlii In recognition of these efforts, Theseus and the 17 th Carrier Air Group was awarded the Rear-Admiral Sir Denis Boyd trophy for 1950 for “outstanding feat of naval aviation”. xliii

Similar feats were achieved by HMS Glory, for example, in September 1951 the 14 th CAG set a record for 66 offensive and 18 defensive sorties in a day, and in March 1953 Glory‘s air group set a record for 123 sorties in one day, equal to that of HMS Ocean, and resulting in the destruction of “seven bridges, 28 buildings , and five oxcarts.” xliv Glory saw the most overall action during the Korean War, totalling 9,500 operational sorties. xlv All told, Glory‘s aircraft dropped 3,818,000 lbs of ordinance, in addition to 24,328 rockets and over 1.4 million rounds of 20mm, resulting in the destruction of 70 bridges, 392 vehicles and 49 railways trucks for the loss of 20 crew. xlvi

VR943 of 804 Squadron launches from HMS Glory, June 1951. xlvii

Operations in Korea were strenuous. Briefed the night before, a typical day involved waking at 0400 for flights launching at 0500. An average of 50 sorties were flown each day, though 66 or 68 was not unheard of, each sortie lasting two to two and a half hours. xlviii Flights were over mountainous, difficult terrain against targets often heavily defended and camouflaged. xlix The Fury pilots adapted to these missions: for example, pilots of 804 (Glory) and 802 (Ocean) Squadrons developed 45 º dive bombing tactics for bridge strikes. l Weather conditions ranged from extreme heat to intense cold. Snow storms grounded operations, while flying in summer heat resulted in cockpit temperatures of 140 º . li During the snowy conditions prevailing in December 1950, Theseus, as part of the Sasebo rescue effort, launched sorties against Chinnampo despite the weather. lii

“ Combat operations rarely stopped for… minor inconveniences such as snow.” liii

Skilfully handled, the Sea Fury was a match for the jet powered MiG-15, the latter faster by 200 mph, as demonstrated by an engagement at 0600 9 August 1952: “four Sea Furies [commanded by Lt Peter Carmichael, 802 (Ocean) Squadron] were flying north of Chinimpo, returning from a raid on railway lines and trains. They were attacked by eight MiG-15s at 3,500 feet… one MiG-15 was shot down and another two damaged.” liv

Sea Fury WJ288 at 2009 Oshkosh Air Show. lv

The Korean experience demonstrated the flexibility and capability of naval aviation in the era of limited war. lvi The skilled pilots of the FAA rose to the challenge and their combat record attests to their esprit de corps as much as the technical qualities of the Seafire, Sea Fury and Firefly aircraft they flew. All told the FAA flew 23,000 sorties between 1950-3. lvii The FAA dropped 15,000 bombs, fired 57,600 rockets and 3.3 million rounds of 20mm. RAN pilots flew 2,366 sorties, dropped 802 bombs and fired 6,359 rockets and 269,000 rounds of 20mm. lviii It should also be kept in mind that this impressive war-time record was amassed by aircraft believed to be obsolete (the Sea Fury was replaced by the Attacker and then Sea Hawk jet fighters after the Korean War), and during a period of significant cost-cutting at the Admiralty. lix After the Second World War it was expected that only 10% of the FAA would be dedicated to strike aircraft. lx

iiKev Darling, Hawker Typhoon, Tempest and Sea Fury, Ramsbury, Marlborough: The Crowood Press Ltd, 2003, p 121


Kobo Rakuten

Por el momento no hay artículos en tu carrito de compra.

*No commitment, cancel anytime

Disponible el:
Disponible el:

1 audiobook monthly

+ FREE 30-day trial

Get 1 credit every month to exchange for an audiobook of your choice

*No commitment, cancel anytime

*No commitment, cancel anytime

Disponible el:
Disponible el:

1 audiobook monthly

+ FREE 30-day trial

Get 1 credit every month to exchange for an audiobook of your choice

*No commitment, cancel anytime


About the Author

Review this product

Top reviews from Australia

Top reviews from other countries

I must admit I cannot agree with the first two reviews of this book in any shape or form. I have read some other books written by Mr Darling, and they're not bad at all. But this, quite frankly, is awful, to the point that I nearly gave it away to a charity shop about half way through.

First and foremost, let me explain my credentials. I am a serving Fleet Air Arm officer with over 32 years experience and I have studied the history of Naval Aviation for much of that time.

It starts off okay and details the development of Naval Aviation from the Mayfly in 1909, Squadron Commander Dunning's attempts to land on board HMS FURIOUS in 1917, through the inter-war years and the savaging of Royal Naval aviation by the RAF, on to the reformation of the Fleet Air Arm back under Admiralty control in 1937 and the start of WW2. Perhaps quite surprising was no mention of the Inskip Committee which recommended the return of the FAA from the RAF to the Admiralty and perhaps this should have rung alarm bells given the importance of this decision to the History of British Naval Aviation, which after all is the sub-title of the book.

I could live with that, after all the book is only 352 pages and so some things must be left out, but I could not live with the number of errors that I found. Now, these are just the ones that I identified from my own knowledge without any need to cross check to the FAA Museum or other public records. I have around 100 or so tabbed up in my copy, but for example, Page 72 refers to HMS Eagle joining the Mediterranean Fleet in 1949, when in fact she was sunk in 1942 whiles en-route to Malta as part of the famous Operation Pedestal. Page 161 describes SAR as Search/Air Rescue in reality it is Search and Rescue (I suspect this is a misunderstanding from the RAF terminology ASR for Air Sea Rescue). According to Page 178 HMS THESEUS left the Korean theatre of operations on 25 April 1951 en-route for Hong Kong and passage home to Portsmouth. where she supposedly arrived on the same day 25 April. The photograph on Page 234 captioned as a Sea Vixen FAW1 XN657 is clearly a FAW2 XP955. Page 282 states that the Type 909 Fire Control radar was replaced by the Type 996 they are totally different radars in that 909 is the fire control for Sea Dart (which was removed when Sea Dart was removed from the INVINCIBLE class) whilst 996 is the medium range surveillance and target indication replacement for the Type 992). Within the colour plates, a Wasp helicopter clearly landing on board one of the CVS is entitled as landing on board HMS ROTHESAY, a Sea King is entitled as being photographed on board HMS INVINCIBLE when there is grass clearly adjacent to the hardstanding and there is a glib throw away comment opposite Page 193 that states that the Royal Navy was not heavily involved in Operation Granby. When I was there in 1991, we had at least 8 escorts each with at least one Lynx, at least one if not two squadrons of Sea King 4s and 826 Sqn's Mk 6s. I would suggest that that was the biggest Naval deployment since the Falklands.

Furthermore, and this really started to get to me after a while, was Mr Darling's repeated use of the term "No" every time he named a FAA Squadron. The RAF has "No 1 Sqn", "No 208 Sqn" etc, the FAA dropped that in the the 1930s. And finally, the minor number of typos and grammatical errors really grated. It was almost as if the book had not been proof read at all, which given that Pen & Sword are normally excellent in this respect, I cannot believe.

What are the positives? The individual squadron/mission records, especially from Korea, are exceptionally well researched and go into incredible depth it does seem clear that a very detailed study, down to authorisation sheet level, has probably taken place, but I'm afraid that the good bits are seriously outweighed by the bad. If you want a good overall history of the Fleet Air Arm, buy David Wragg's "A century of British Naval Aviation 1909-2009".


Fleet Air Arm

The Fleet Air Arm (FAA) is one of the five fighting arms of the Royal Navy [7] and is responsible for the delivery of naval air power both from land and at sea. The Fleet Air Arm operates the F-35 Lightning II in a Maritime Strike Role, the AW159 Wildcat and AW101 Merlin in both Commando and Anti-Submarine roles, and the BAE Hawk in an aggressor role. [8]

The Fleet Air Arm today is a predominantly rotary force, with helicopters undertaking roles once performed by biplanes such as the Fairey Swordfish. [9]

The Fleet Air Arm was formed in 1924 as an organisational unit of the Royal Air Force, which was then operating the aircraft embarked on RN ships—the Royal Naval Air Service having been merged with the British Army's Royal Flying Corps in 1918 to form the Royal Air Force—and did not come under the direct control of the Admiralty until mid 1939. During the Second World War, the Fleet Air Arm operated aircraft on ships as well as land-based aircraft that defended the Royal Navy's shore establishments and facilities.


Fleet Air Arm Carrier Warfare, Kev Darling - History

+£4.50 UK Delivery or free UK delivery if order is over £35
(click here for international delivery rates)

Need a currency converter? Check XE.com for live rates

Other formats available - Buy the Hardback and get the eBook for free! Price
Fleet Air Arm Carrier War ePub (59.5 MB) Add to Basket £4.99
Fleet Air Arm Carrier War Kindle (132.5 MB) Add to Basket £4.99

This is the story of British naval flying from aircraft carriers, from its conception in World War One to the present day. It includes the types of aircraft and the men who flew them, the carriers and the evolution of their designs, the theatres of war in which they served and their notable achievements and tragedies. It traces navy flying from the early days of the biplane, through the rapid developments during World War Two to the post-war introduction of jet-powered flight. The British inventions of the angled flight deck and later vertical landing jets revolutionised sea warfare and allowed the carrier to play a vital part in many recent land wars when naval aircraft flew in support of Allied land forces.

Although the British carriers have always been smaller than their American counterparts, the Royal Navy and its aircraft have always been in the van of the development of ships and aircraft. This is the proud history of British Naval flying and ships such as HMS Eagle, HMS Hermes, HMS Glorious, HMS Ark Royal and many more.

There have been many books on American naval aviation but remarkably few about the British who, after all, invented it. This extensive, well researched and very well illustrated book puts things right. A very good historical overview of an important naval activity.

Baird Maritime - January 2012

Kev Darling has written many aviation books such as P-51 Mustang, Warbirdtech 28: English Electric Lightning and Merlin-powered Spitfires. He is one of Britain's most highly respected aviation authors.


Fleet Air Arm Carrier Warfare, Kev Darling - History

Need a currency converter? Check XE.com for live rates

Other formats available - Buy the Hardback and get the eBook for free! Price
Fleet Air Arm Carrier War Hardback Add to Basket £25.00
Fleet Air Arm Carrier War Kindle (132.5 MB) Add to Basket £4.99

This is the story of British naval flying from aircraft carriers, from its conception in World War One to the present day. It includes the types of aircraft and the men who flew them, the carriers and the evolution of their designs, the theatres of war in which they served and their notable achievements and tragedies. It traces navy flying from the early days of the biplane, through the rapid developments during World War Two to the post-war introduction of jet-powered flight. The British inventions of the angled flight deck and later vertical landing jets revolutionised sea warfare and allowed the carrier to play a vital part in many recent land wars when naval aircraft flew in support of Allied land forces.

Although the British carriers have always been smaller than their American counterparts, the Royal Navy and its aircraft have always been in the van of the development of ships and aircraft. This is the proud history of British Naval flying and ships such as HMS Eagle, HMS Hermes, HMS Glorious, HMS Ark Royal and many more.

There have been many books on American naval aviation but remarkably few about the British who, after all, invented it. This extensive, well researched and very well illustrated book puts things right. A very good historical overview of an important naval activity.

Baird Maritime - January 2012

Kev Darling has written many aviation books such as P-51 Mustang, Warbirdtech 28: English Electric Lightning and Merlin-powered Spitfires. He is one of Britain's most highly respected aviation authors.


References

  1. ↑Military Aircraft:Written question – 225369 (House of Commons Hansard)Archived 26 August 2016 at the Wayback Machine
  2. , Parliament of the United Kingdom, March 2015
  3. ↑"ROYAL NAVY SHOWS COMMITMENT TO DRONE TECHNOLOGY FOR FUTURE OPERATIONS". Royal Navy. 31 July 2020 . Retrieved 20 October 2020 .
  4. "No. 63151". The London Gazette (Supplement). 20 October 2020. p.   17730.
  5. "NAVY'S DRONE EXPERTS 700X NAS READY TO DEPLOY ON WARSHIPS".
  6. "705 Naval Air Squadron | Royal Navy". royalnavy.mod.uk.
  7. Perry, Dominic. "PICTURES: Juno and Jupiter helicopters arrive at RAF Shawbury". Flightglobal.
  8. "THE ROYAL NAVY'S SURFACE FLEET" (PDF) . royalnavy.mod.uk. MOD UK. Archived (PDF) from the original on 18 October 2012 . Retrieved 5 August 2018 .
  9. "736 Naval Air Squadron".
  10. https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/the-equipment/aircraft. Missing or empty | title= (help)
  11. "Naval Aviation history and the Fleet Air Arm Origins". fleetairarmarchive.net. Archived from the original on 19 May 2015 . Retrieved 8 June 2015 .
  12. "Training of Naval Officers at Eastchurch". Flight. III (124): 420. 13 May 1911. Archived from the original on 25 May 2015 . Retrieved 8 June 2015 .
  13. ↑Roskill 1969, p.   156.
  14. ↑Bradbeer 2014.
  15. ↑Boyne 2003, p.   70.
  16. "Interwar: Fleet Air Arm". Sea Your History. Archived from the original on 2 April 2016 . Retrieved 8 June 2015 .
  17. "The History of the Fleet Air Arm Officers Association, FAAOA". fleetairarmoa.org. Archived from the original on 18 April 2012 . Retrieved 8 June 2015 .
  18. "Fleet Air Arm squadrons taking part in the Battle of Britain under RAF Fighter Command". Fleet Air Arm Archive 1939�. Archived from the original on 25 June 2015 . Retrieved 8 June 2015 .
  19. ↑ Manning, p. 149
  20. "World's Air Forces 1989". Flight International: 61󈞪. 29 November 1989. Archived from the original on 1 December 2017 . Retrieved 19 November 2017 .
  21. "Naval Strike Wing". royalnavy.mod.uk. Royal Navy. Archived from the original on 24 May 2010 . Retrieved 25 June 2010 .
  22. "National Security Strategy and Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015" (PDF) . Government of the United Kingdom. November 2015. Archived (PDF) from the original on 25 October 2016 . Retrieved 14 September 2016 . Two new Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers, the largest warships ever built for the Royal Navy. These will enter service from 2018, transforming the Royal Navy’s ability to project our influence overseas. (p. 30)
  23. Jennings, Garth (4 November 2015). "UK signs for more operational F-35Bs". janes.com. IHS Jane's Defence Weekly. Archived from the original on 8 December 2015. 14 September 2016
  24. "809 NAVAL AIR SQUADRON". royalnavy.mod.uk. Royal Navy. Archived from the original on 11 September 2016 . Retrieved 14 September 2016 . 809 Naval Air Squadron (NAS) has been resurrected as the first Royal Navy formation to fly the UK's Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter aircraft.
  25. ↑ Darling, p. 224
  26. "Royal Navy monthly situation report" (PDF) . 1 December 2013. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2 February 2014 . Retrieved 9 February 2014 . See table 4a page 18 and table 4b page 20
  27. https://www.fleetairarmoa.org/news/all-change-at-the-top-fleet-air-arm-. Missing or empty | title= (help)
  28. at 2:35   pm. "Royal Navy To Cut Back On Senior Personnel". Forces Network . Retrieved 8 January 2020 .
  29. "Fleet Air Arm Video Page: "Once a WAFU, Always a WAFU " ". Royal Naval Association Wrexham Branch . Retrieved 29 August 2020 .
  30. Hind, Bob. "Royal Navy flyers land on pitching postage stamp deck". The News (Portsmouth) . Retrieved 29 August 2020 .
  31. Jolly, Rick (25 January 2018). Jackspeak: A guide to British Naval slang & usage. Bloomsbury Publishing. ISBN   978-1472834140 . Retrieved 29 August 2020 .
  32. Adlam, Hank. (2009). On and off the flight deck   : reflections of a naval fighter pilot in World War II. Barnsley: Pen & Sword Aviation. ISBN   978-1-84884-195-6 . OCLC   428778144.
  33. "Royal Flying Corps – people". airhistory.org.uk . Retrieved 30 April 2020 .
  34. "Kay Canvas". kaycanvas.com . Retrieved 30 April 2020 .
  35. "Royal Navy BR3 – Dress Regulations" (PDF) . p.   39E𔂿.
  36. Parsons, Gary (29 September 2009). "Royal Navy unveils its new King Air". key.aero. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016 . Retrieved 8 June 2015 .
  37. "736 Naval Air Squadron - a Freedom of Information request to Royal Navy". WhatDoTheyKnow. 30 December 2020 . Retrieved 28 January 2021 .
  38. "DHFS rebadging as No. 1 FTS – Shropshire Star".
  39. "DE&S delivers Merlin Mk4". Defence Equipment & Support. 24 May 2018.
  40. https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/the-equipment/aircraft/helicopters/merlin-mk2. Missing or empty | title= (help)
  41. Vavasseur, Xavier (11 April 2019). "First Flight For Royal Navy's Merlin Crowsnest AEW Helicopter". Naval News.
  42. ↑https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/news-and-latest-activity/news/2020/august/17/200817-700x-three-new-flights?fbclid=IwAR33PNekQJrsr97l-6PIB6O9QAIatwwN2fOfILg69OQHYOZdEZ29adbH8Kk
  43. "Osborne: UK to speed up aircraft carrier jet purchase". BBC News. 22 November 2015 . Retrieved 22 November 2015 .
  44. "National Security Strategy and Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015" (PDF) . Government of the United Kingdom. Archived (PDF) from the original on 24 November 2015 . Retrieved 26 November 2015 .
  45. "UK declares IOC Land for F-35 force". IHS Janes. 11 January 2019 . Retrieved 11 January 2019 .
  46. https://airforcesmonthly.keypublishing.com/2019/05/21/lightning-to-cyprus-first-deployment-for-uk-f-35b/. Missing or empty | title= (help)
  47. https://www.itv.com/news/anglia/2018-08-04/further-five-f-35-fighter-jets-land-at-new-raf-marham-home/. Missing or empty | title= (help)
  48. 12
  49. "Naval Air Squadrons". royalnavy.mod.uk. Archived from the original on 27 July 2009 . Retrieved 6 August 2009 .
  50. "Navy's Drone Experts 700X NAS ready to deploy on warships". Royal Navy. 17 August 2020 . Retrieved 17 August 2020 .
  51. 12
  52. "X-men take to the Cornish skies". Royal Navy. 25 November 2014. Archived from the original on 28 November 2014 . Retrieved 25 November 2014 .
  53. "727 NAS takes on extra training role to pave way for Lightning II stealth fighters". Navy News. Archived from the original on 19 January 2017 . Retrieved 18 January 2017 .
  54. "736 Naval Air Squadron - a Freedom of Information request to Royal Navy". WhatDoTheyKnow. 30 December 2020 . Retrieved 28 January 2021 .
  55. Royal Navy (14 November 2018). "Naval squadron re-forms after 60 years to test cutting-edge weaponry". Royal Navy. Archived from the original on 15 November 2018 . Retrieved 14 November 2018 .
  56. Fleet Air Arm Association (19 October 2018). "744 NAS Commissioning". Fleet Air Arm Association. Archived from the original on 14 November 2018 . Retrieved 14 November 2018 .
  57. Ricks, Rebecca (28 March 2018). "Submarine Hunting 829 Naval Air Squadron Decommissioned". Forces News. BFBS. Archived from the original on 30 March 2018 . Retrieved 30 March 2018 .
  58. 12
  59. "The Lynx Wildcat evolution". Royal Navy. 23 May 2014. Archived from the original on 28 May 2014 . Retrieved 17 June 2014 .
  60. "Yeovilton is now totally wild as last new helicopter is delivered". Navy News. Navy News. 26 October 2016. Archived from the original on 30 October 2016 . Retrieved 30 October 2016 .
  61. "Royal Navy Lynx HMA8 fleet bows out of service". Flightglobal. 17 March 2017. Archived from the original on 17 March 2017 . Retrieved 17 March 2017 .
  62. "Young pilot makes history with first deck landing on HMS Queen Elizabeth – Royal Navy". royalnavy.mod.uk. Archived from the original on 6 July 2017.
  63. "820 NAS named Fleet Air Arm's safety champions". Royal Navy. 14 July 2020 . Retrieved 24 July 2020 .
  64. "849 NAS" (PDF) . Ministry of Defence. 6 August 2020. FOI2020/08297 . Retrieved 6 August 2020 – via WhatDoTheyKnow. Cite journal requires | journal= (help)
  65. "SKASaC takes final bow ahead of retirement". Jane's 360. Jane's. 21 September 2018. Archived from the original on 12 October 2018 . Retrieved 12 October 2018 .
  66. 12
  67. "Merlins receive 𧷅m to convert them into the Navy's 'flying eyes ' ". Navy News. 16 January 2017. Archived from the original on 30 March 2018 . Retrieved 30 March 2018 .
  68. "847 Naval Air Squadron – Royal Navy". mod.uk. Archived from the original on 13 June 2015 . Retrieved 8 June 2015 .
  69. "British International Helicopters – Royal Navy Contracting".
  70. Norris, Guy (10 February 2015). "U.K. 'Lightning Force' Stands Up F-35B Operations At Edwards AFB". Aerospace Daily. Archived from the original on 19 December 2016 . Retrieved 12 October 2018 .
  71. "Royal Navy Historic Flight Stands Down after 50 Years". Navy Wings. 29 March 2019 . Retrieved 25 April 2019 .
  72. "Rear-Admiral 'Chico' Roberts". The Daily Telegraph. London. 5 September 2011. ISSN   0307-1235. OCLC   49632006. Archived from the original on 8 April 2012 . Retrieved 22 March 2013 .

Sources

  • Boyne, Walter J. (2003). The Influence of Air Power Upon History . Pelican Publishing. ISBN   9781455606337 .
  • Bradbeer, Thomas G. (2014). Battle For Air Supremacy Over The Somme: 1 June-30 November 1916. Pickle Partners Publishing. ISBN   9781782896036 .
  • Darling, Kev (2009). Fleet Air Arm Carrier War: The History of British Naval Aviation. Barnsley: Pen & Sword Aviation. ISBN   978-1-84415-903-1 .
  • Hackett, James, ed. (3 February 2010). The Military Balance 2010. London: Routledge for the International Institute for Strategic Studies. ISBN   978-1-85743-557-3 .
  • Manning, Charles, ed. (2000). Fly Navy: The View from the Cockpit 1945�. Barnsley: Leo Cooper. ISBN   085052-732-5 .
  • Roskill, Stephen Wentworth (1969). Documents Relating to the Naval Air Service: 1908�. I. London: Navy Records Society.
  • Sturtivant, Ray Ballance, Theo (1994). The Squadrons of the Fleet Air Arm. Kent, UK: Air Britain. ISBN   0-85130-223-8 .

Top reviews from India

Top reviews from other countries

I must admit I cannot agree with the first two reviews of this book in any shape or form. I have read some other books written by Mr Darling, and they're not bad at all. But this, quite frankly, is awful, to the point that I nearly gave it away to a charity shop about half way through.

First and foremost, let me explain my credentials. I am a serving Fleet Air Arm officer with over 32 years experience and I have studied the history of Naval Aviation for much of that time.

It starts off okay and details the development of Naval Aviation from the Mayfly in 1909, Squadron Commander Dunning's attempts to land on board HMS FURIOUS in 1917, through the inter-war years and the savaging of Royal Naval aviation by the RAF, on to the reformation of the Fleet Air Arm back under Admiralty control in 1937 and the start of WW2. Perhaps quite surprising was no mention of the Inskip Committee which recommended the return of the FAA from the RAF to the Admiralty and perhaps this should have rung alarm bells given the importance of this decision to the History of British Naval Aviation, which after all is the sub-title of the book.

I could live with that, after all the book is only 352 pages and so some things must be left out, but I could not live with the number of errors that I found. Now, these are just the ones that I identified from my own knowledge without any need to cross check to the FAA Museum or other public records. I have around 100 or so tabbed up in my copy, but for example, Page 72 refers to HMS Eagle joining the Mediterranean Fleet in 1949, when in fact she was sunk in 1942 whiles en-route to Malta as part of the famous Operation Pedestal. Page 161 describes SAR as Search/Air Rescue in reality it is Search and Rescue (I suspect this is a misunderstanding from the RAF terminology ASR for Air Sea Rescue). According to Page 178 HMS THESEUS left the Korean theatre of operations on 25 April 1951 en-route for Hong Kong and passage home to Portsmouth. where she supposedly arrived on the same day 25 April. The photograph on Page 234 captioned as a Sea Vixen FAW1 XN657 is clearly a FAW2 XP955. Page 282 states that the Type 909 Fire Control radar was replaced by the Type 996 they are totally different radars in that 909 is the fire control for Sea Dart (which was removed when Sea Dart was removed from the INVINCIBLE class) whilst 996 is the medium range surveillance and target indication replacement for the Type 992). Within the colour plates, a Wasp helicopter clearly landing on board one of the CVS is entitled as landing on board HMS ROTHESAY, a Sea King is entitled as being photographed on board HMS INVINCIBLE when there is grass clearly adjacent to the hardstanding and there is a glib throw away comment opposite Page 193 that states that the Royal Navy was not heavily involved in Operation Granby. When I was there in 1991, we had at least 8 escorts each with at least one Lynx, at least one if not two squadrons of Sea King 4s and 826 Sqn's Mk 6s. I would suggest that that was the biggest Naval deployment since the Falklands.

Furthermore, and this really started to get to me after a while, was Mr Darling's repeated use of the term "No" every time he named a FAA Squadron. The RAF has "No 1 Sqn", "No 208 Sqn" etc, the FAA dropped that in the the 1930s. And finally, the minor number of typos and grammatical errors really grated. It was almost as if the book had not been proof read at all, which given that Pen & Sword are normally excellent in this respect, I cannot believe.

What are the positives? The individual squadron/mission records, especially from Korea, are exceptionally well researched and go into incredible depth it does seem clear that a very detailed study, down to authorisation sheet level, has probably taken place, but I'm afraid that the good bits are seriously outweighed by the bad. If you want a good overall history of the Fleet Air Arm, buy David Wragg's "A century of British Naval Aviation 1909-2009".


  • UK orders start from £1.25
  • European orders from £4.95
  • Other international orders from £4.95

If, for whatever reason, you need to return an item to us , it must be unused and in the same condition that you received it. It must also be in the original packaging.

Our policy lasts 30 days. If 30 days have gone by since your purchase, unfortunately we can’t offer you a refund or exchange.

To complete your return, we require a receipt or proof of purchase.

There are certain situations where only partial refunds are granted (if applicable)

  • Book with obvious signs of use
  • CD or DVD, that has been opened
  • Any item not in its original condition, is damaged or missing parts for reasons not due to our error
  • Any item that is returned more than 30 days after delivery


Watch the video: WW2 Fleet Air Arm u0026 the Fairey Swordfish: an interview with Bruce Vibert (January 2022).