Information

Canterbury Shaker Village


Canterbury Shaker Village is an internationally known, non-profit museum and historic site in Canterbury, New Hampshire. The village is a unique resource for learning about Shaker architectural intent and early Shaker community planning and design, as well as many periods of Shaker life.The Shakers are a religious group formed in 18th-century England when dissidents from various religions, including English Quakers and Methodists, formed a religious society based on prophetic doctrine.Historical evidence reveals that the village was established in 1792, when followers of founder Mother Ann Lee formed their seventh community in Canterbury. Being one of the oldest and most completely preserved Shaker Villages, CSV boasts the only intact, first-generation 18th century meetinghouse and dwelling House, both in their original locations.Currently, Canterbury Shaker Village consist of 25 original Shaker buildings, three reconstructed Shaker buildings, and 694 acres of gardens, nature trails, woods, ponds, and meadows, maintaining the heritage of the Canterbury Shakers. CSV is dedicated to preserving the 200-year legacy of the Canterbury Shakers and is designated as a National Historic Landmark for its architectural integrity and significance.CSV's museum collections contain about 30,000 objects, 10,000 photographic images, and more than 35,000 manuscript items of Shaker. Historic photographs also are available for sale through the museum store.The Archives Reading Room is open to the public for research purposes. Through tours, buildings, gardens, programs, exhibits, research, lectures, and publications, one gets a rare a glimpse at the Canterbury Shakers' life, ideas, and values.


First granted by Lieutenant Governor John Wentworth in 1727, the town was named for William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury. [2] It was originally a militia timber fort and trading post of Capt. Jeremiah Clough located on a hill near Canterbury Center, where the Pennacook Indians came to trade. The town would be incorporated in 1741. [3] There were several garrison houses or stockades in the area as late as 1758. [4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 44.4 square miles (115.0 km 2 ), of which 43.6 square miles (112.9 km 2 ) is land and 0.8 square miles (2.1 km 2 ) is water, comprising 1.82% of the town. [5] The town's highest point is an unnamed summit near Forest Pond and the town's northern border, where the elevation reaches approximately 1,390 feet (420 m) above sea level. Bounded by the Merrimack River on the west, Canterbury is drained on the east by the Soucook River. Canterbury lies fully within the Merrimack River watershed. [6]

Adjacent municipalities Edit

Historical population
Census Pop.
17901,038
18001,114 7.3%
18101,526 37.0%
18201,696 11.1%
18301,663 −1.9%
18401,643 −1.2%
18501,614 −1.8%
18601,522 −5.7%
18701,169 −23.2%
18801,033 −11.6%
1890964 −6.7%
1900821 −14.8%
1910680 −17.2%
1920655 −3.7%
1930505 −22.9%
1940659 30.5%
1950627 −4.9%
1960674 7.5%
1970895 32.8%
19801,410 57.5%
19901,687 19.6%
20001,979 17.3%
20102,352 18.8%
2017 (est.)2,425 [7] 3.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]

As of the census [9] of 2000, there were 1,979 people, 749 households, and 590 families residing in the town. The population density was 45.1 people per square mile (17.4/km 2 ). There were 838 housing units at an average density of 19.1 per square mile (7.4/km 2 ). The racial makeup of the town was 98.59% White, 0.25% African American, 0.25% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, and 0.76% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.51% of the population.

There were 749 households, out of which 33.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.0% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.2% were non-families. 15.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 24.5% under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 34.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.4 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $58,026, and the median income for a family was $62,583. Males had a median income of $41,302 versus $32,313 for females. The per capita income for the town was $27,374. About 2.0% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.7% of those under age 18 and 2.0% of those age 65 or over.

Annual cultural events Edit

On the last Saturday in July, the town hosts the annual Canterbury Fair, which includes artisan performances, music performances and a 5K run. [10] [11] [12]

The town also hosts a regular Fourth of July parade as well a fireworks show by the town fire department.

Tourism Edit

The biggest attraction in Canterbury is the Shaker Village, established in 1792. At its peak in the 1850s, over 300 people lived, worked and worshiped in 100 buildings on 4,000 acres (16 km 2 ). They made their living by farming, selling seeds, herbs and herbal medicines and by manufacturing textiles, pails, brooms and other products. The last resident, Sister Ethel Hudson, died in 1992, and the site is now a museum, founded in 1969, to preserve the heritage of the utopian sect. Canterbury Shaker Village is an internationally known, non-profit historic site with 25 original Shaker buildings, four reconstructed Shaker buildings and 694 acres (2.81 km 2 ) of forest, fields, gardens and mill ponds under permanent conservation easement. It has been designated a National Historic Landmark for its architectural integrity and significance. [3] [13] [14]

Canterbury has an active historical society hosting events throughout the year and maintaining the Elizabeth Houser Museum in the old Center Schoolhouse (original one-room school house) as well as an archive of Canterbury-related materials dating to the early 18th-century. [15] Among notable works in the archive are the Lunther Cody Collection of Glass Negatives, documenting classic life in New England. [16] [17]

Canterbury is home to Ayers State Forest and Shaker State Forest. Ayers State Forest covers 50 acres (20 ha), and Shaker State Forest is 226.5 acres (91.7 ha). [18]


Contents

The first Shaker community was established north of Albany, and was first called "Niskayuna", a rendering of the Indian name for the land. Later the town they were in was officially named Watervliet. That part of the town of Watervliet is now in the town of Colonie (since 1895), and the name Watervliet is now limited to the city of Watervliet (1896). In addition, Niskayuna is now the name of a town to the northwest. This has led to some confusion, because many historical accounts refer to them as the Niskayuna Shakers, while others refer to them as Watervliet Shakers. The Watervliet Shaker Historic District is where Mother Ann Lee was buried. [1]

By 1780, the missionary work of the Shakers had attracted many new converts. An extensive series of trips throughout New England from 1781 through 1783 brought in followers across the entire region. Converts began appearing in New Lebanon and Canaan, New York Hancock, Pittsfield, Richmond, Ashfield, Harvard, and Shirley, Massachusetts and the states of Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Maine (then part of Massachusetts), among other locations.

In 1784, Ann Lee and her brother both died, leaving James Whittaker to lead the faith. By 1787, he too had died, and Joseph Meacham assumed the role as leader. Meacham appointed Lucy Wright of Pittsfield to co-lead, and under their auspices they organized a central village in New Lebanon, as well as organizing the original settlement of Watervliet. By 1790, the Hancock Village was also organized. After the formation of the New Lebanon, Watervliet, and Hancock communities, within three years nine more communities would organize in Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Maine.

The Shakers built more than 20 settlements that attracted at least 20,000 converts over the next century. [2] Strict believers in celibacy, Shakers acquired their members through conversion, indenturing children, and adoption of orphans. Some children, such as Isaac N. Youngs, came to the Shakers when their parents joined, then grew up to become faithful members as adults. [3]

As their communities grew, women and men shared leadership of the Shaker communities. Women preached and received revelations as the Spirit fell upon them. Thriving on the religious enthusiasm of the first and second Great Awakenings, the Shakers declared their messianic, communitarian message with significant response. One early convert observed: "The wisdom of their instructions, the purity of their doctrine, their Christ-like deportment, and the simplicity of their manners, all appeared truly apostolical." The Shakers represent a small but important Utopian response to the gospel. Preaching in their communities knew no boundaries of gender, social class, or education. [4]

Bishoprics Edit

Shaker communities were grouped into bishoprics, which were governing units. The leadership team, called a ministry, resided in the bishopric's primary community. This ministry consisted of two men known as Elders and two women known as Eldresses. The New Lebanon Bishopric, the primary bishopric unit, was located in New York and included the Mount Lebanon and Watervliet Shaker Villages, [5] as well as, after 1859, Groveland Shaker Village. In addition to its own member communities, the ministry of New Lebanon Bishopric oversaw all other Shaker bishoprics and communes. After New Lebanon closed in 1947, this central Ministry relocated to Hancock Shaker Village, and after the closure of that community in 1960, to Canterbury Shaker Village. When Canterbury closed in 1992, Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village remained as the last extant Shaker commune.

Family groups Edit

A Shaker village was divided into groups or "families." The leading group in each village was the Church Family, and it was surrounded by satellite families that were often named for points on the compass rose. Managing each family was a leadership team consisting of two Elders and two Eldresses. Shakers lived together as brothers and sisters. Each house was divided so that men and women did most things separately. They used different staircases and doors. They sat on opposite sides of the room in worship, at meals, and in "union meetings" held to provide supervised socialization between the sexes. However, the daily business of a Shaker village required the brethren and sisters to interact, as did the dancing and other vigorous activity of their worship services. Though there was a division of labor between men and women, they also cooperated in carrying out many tasks, such as harvesting apples, food production, laundry, and gathering firewood. [6] Every family was designed to be self-supporting with its own farm and businesses, but in times of hardship, other parts of the village, or even other Shaker villages, pitched in to help the afflicted.

Image Site Spiritual name [7] Bishopric [8] City State Dates Historic designation
Alfred Shaker Village Holy Land Alfred [nb 1] Alfred Maine 1793-1931 [10] NRHP [11]
Canterbury Shaker Village Holy Ground Canterbury Canterbury New Hampshire 1792-1992 [12] NRHP [11]
New Enfield Shaker Village Chosen Vale Canterbury Enfield New Hampshire 1793-1923 [13] NRHP [11]
Old Enfield Shaker Village City of Union Hancock Enfield Connecticut 1792-1917 [14] NRHP [11]
Gorham Shaker Village Union Branch Alfred Gorham Maine 1808-1819 [15]
Groveland Shaker Village Union Branch Groveland [nb 2] Groveland New York 1836-1892 [16]
Hancock Shaker Village City of Peace Hancock Hancock and Pittsfield [nb 3] Massachusetts 1790-1960 [17] NRHP [11]
Harvard Shaker Village Lovely Vineyard Harvard Harvard Massachusetts 1792-1918 [18] NRHP [11]
Mount Lebanon Shaker Village Holy Mount New Lebanon New Lebanon New York 1785-1917 [19] NRHP [11]
Narcoosee Shaker Village Olive Branch Union Village Narcoosee Florida 1895-1924 [20] [nb 4]
New Canaan Shaker Village None New Lebanon New Canaan Connecticut 1810-1812 [21]
North Union Shaker Village Holy Grove North Union [nb 5] Cleveland Ohio 1822-1899 [22] NRHP [11]
Philadelphia Shakers None Watervliet [nb 6] Philadelphia [nb 7] Pennsylvania 1858-c.1910 [23]
Pleasant Hill Shaker Village None Pleasant Hill [nb 5] Harrodsburg Kentucky 1806-1910 [24] NRHP [11]
Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village Chosen Land Alfred [nb 1] New Gloucester Maine 1794–present [25] NRHP [11]
Savoy Shaker Village None New Lebanon Savoy Massachusetts 1817-1821 [nb 8] [26]
Shirley Shaker Village Pleasant Garden Harvard Shirley Massachusetts 1793-1908 [27] NRHP [11]
Sodus Bay Shaker Village None New Lebanon Sodus and Huron New York 1826-1836 [28]
South Union Shaker Village Jasper Valley South Union [nb 5] South Union Kentucky 1807-1922 [29] NRHP [11]
Tyringham Shaker Village City of Love Hancock Tyringham Massachusetts 1792-1875 [30] NRHP [11]
Union Village Shaker Village Wisdom's Paradise Union Village [nb 5] Turtlecreek Township Ohio 1805-1912 [31]
Watervliet Shaker Village Wisdom's Valley New Lebanon Albany New York 1776-1926 [32] NRHP [11]
Watervliet Shaker Village (Ohio) Vale of Peace Union Village [nb 5] Kettering Ohio 1806-1900 [33] Marker #6-57 [34]
West Union Shaker Village (Busro) None Union Village Busro Indiana 1807-1827 [8]
White Oak Shaker Village None Union Village White Oak Georgia 1898-1902 [35]
Whitewater Shaker Village Lonely Plain of Tribulation Whitewater [nb 5] New Haven Ohio 1822-1916 [36] NRHP [11]

Out-families, short-lived settlements, and missions Edit

Some organized In addition to the organized communities, other small and very short-lived communities emerged during the history of the Shakers, as well as various missions. These included:

  • Numerous communities throughout New England: Cheshire, Ashfield, Richmond, Shelburne Falls, Turners Falls, Norton, Petersham, Grafton, Upton, and Rehoboth in Massachusetts Windham, Preston, Stonington, and Saybrook, Connecticut Guilford and Pittsford, Vermont and Tuftonboro, New Hampshire. These emerged during the 1780s but were eventually absorbed into the larger Shaker communities. [37]
  • Two families in Canaan, New York. These began in 1813, and were part of the larger New Lebanon Village. [38]
  • Poland Hill at Poland, Maine. This community, founded by the former residents of Gorham when that village closed, served as the North Family and Gathering Order of the Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village. , or the Mill Family, in Warren County, Kentucky, was a venture by the South Union, Kentucky, Shakers, to establish a water-powered mill some 16 miles removed from the South Union community itself. Begun in 1817, the venture proved unsuccessful and was shut down in 1829. [39]
  • A community in Darby Plains in Union County, Ohio, which existed from 1822-1823. Quickly abandoned, the Shakers there relocated to the Whitewater Settlement. [38]
  • Missions to Straight Creek and Eagle Creek in Ohio. [38]
  • A short-lived settlement at Red Banks, Kentucky. [38]
  • Missions to San Francisco and San Diego, California, in the 1880s and 1890s. Arthur W. Dowe, from Canterbury Shaker Village, operated a mission in San Francisco for several years in the early- and mid-1890s at 948 Mission Street. [40] A small urban community of Shakers persisted in the city until the 1906 earthquake and ensuing fire. [41] Cornelia R. Powers, of Watervliet Shaker Village, was in San Diego by the late 1880s and missionized there for several years. [42]

In the 19th century, hundreds of tourists visited Shaker villages, and many of them later wrote about their experiences there. Outsiders were invariably impressed by Shaker cleanliness, prosperity, and agriculture. Shaker food was delicious, and they were hospitable to outsiders. Shakers had a reputation for honesty and their products were the best of their kind. [43]


Book signing LAUNCH event

Sunday June 25th from 1:00PM to 4:00PM @ the Canterbury Elementary School

The Historical Society is pleased to announce a “Launch Party” celebrating the publication of a new history of Canterbury which chronicles the events, people and ideas that shaped the town’s history in the 20th Century. Over 200 people were involved in the project over the span of four years. Author Kathryn Grover, a noted writer and historian, was engaged to write the history which is titled, “Staying Small in a Century of Growth”. The well known Peter Randall Publishers of Portsmouth was engaged to handle all the publishing details. Ms. Grover has produced a very readable, enjoyable and comprehensive history that stands apart from most others.

All are invited to attend the “Launch”, to hear Kathryn Grover’s story of how she wrote the history, answer questions about the book and of course, to sign copies. Books will be available that day for purchase. We look forward to seeing you there!

Read more about the book here…


Visitors To The Canterbury Shaker Village Can Visit The Site on Their Own, or Take a Guided Tour

When you plan your visit I recommend giving yourself at least two to three hours to experience the beauty of the Village, to see the exhibits and fully-enjoy the tours. It is easily possible to spend an entire day exploring the Village and many people do.

The Canterbury Shaker Village museum is made up of both indoor and outdoor components, so it is wise to be prepared for the weather on the day of your visit. Canterbury Shaker Village features not only beautiful architecture, but an extensive collection of Shaker furniture, crafts, and objects


Photo, Print, Drawing Homemade brooms at Canterbury Shaker Village, a historic site and museum in Canterbury, New Hampshire

The Library of Congress does not own rights to material in its collections. Therefore, it does not license or charge permission fees for use of such material and cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material.

Ultimately, it is the researcher's obligation to assess copyright or other use restrictions and obtain permission from third parties when necessary before publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the Library's collections.

For information about reproducing, publishing, and citing material from this collection, as well as access to the original items, see: Carol M. Highsmith - Rights and Restrictions Information

  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
  • Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-highsm-47302 (original digital file)
  • Call Number: LC-DIG-highsm- 47302 (ONLINE) [P&P]
  • Access Advisory: ---

Obtaining Copies

If an image is displaying, you can download it yourself. (Some images display only as thumbnails outside the Library of Congress because of rights considerations, but you have access to larger size images on site.)

Alternatively, you can purchase copies of various types through Library of Congress Duplication Services.

  1. If a digital image is displaying: The qualities of the digital image partially depend on whether it was made from the original or an intermediate such as a copy negative or transparency. If the Reproduction Number field above includes a reproduction number that starts with LC-DIG. then there is a digital image that was made directly from the original and is of sufficient resolution for most publication purposes.
  2. If there is information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can use the reproduction number to purchase a copy from Duplication Services. It will be made from the source listed in the parentheses after the number.

If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call Number listed above and including the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

Price lists, contact information, and order forms are available on the Duplication Services Web site.

Access to Originals

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)

  • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.
    As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)
  • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?

  • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.
  • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.


Discover Canterbury Shaker Village

Visiting Canterbury Shaker Village is something like stepping onto a movie set of a Netflix period drama. This historic village is completely intact, encapsulating a past spiritual way of life and universal meditation on New England living. It is a full immersion into the #cottagecore we search for, like and emulate on Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest. The Village is a testament to New England culture in a way — the architecture we still mirror in modern construction, the furniture and decorations in our homes — all originating in the prolific lives, industry, and inventions of the Shakers at Canterbury.

Today, the Village stands far beyond its recognition as a National Historic Landmark, with its collection of 30 historic buildings set before 700 acres of beautiful natural vistas to provide an authentic and unexpected connection with nature, art, entrepreneurship, and reflection and renewal.

A Must Visit – Especially Now

You can find Canterbury Shaker Village (CSV) 20 minutes just outside of Concord. Whether you visit for a cool historical walking tour, a hike in the woods, running a scenic 5k or one of the numerous events held there, CSV offers much to a diversity of interests. CSV has long been a popular wedding venue, and is also the backdrop for concerts, culture, and crafts in New Hampshire – drawing Boston and NYC-based dance companies and musicians to perform alongside poets and artist laureates in the area. And for artists and makers, and those of us who appreciate them, the Artisan Market (September 25), and the ongoing Artist–in–Residency program takes on an otherworldly aura with the Village as a backdrop.

Photo courtesy of Londa Barker.

Throughout the Covid-19 pandemic the outdoor spaces at CSV have been a respite from the anxieties of our daily lives. Plan your own escape with this sneak peek into upcoming performances in CSV’s Music on the Meeting House Green series this summer. Performers include the return of Boston-based Lorraine Chapman Dance Company, indie rock band River Sister, and fun for the whole family with Bees Parks and the Hornets. Amazing cellists, Jan Fuller and Harel Gietheim, will also be returning by popular demand. Performances are free, with a suggested donation of $10.00, every Sunday, beginning June 20 at 4:00pm. Escape the ordinary and attend these great Sunday concerts!

A Family Affair

Visits to CSV were a big part of my childhood in the Concord area. As a Girl Scout, I worked on the requirements for my patches here. With my family CSV was part of every season from hiking the grounds, Christmas celebrations at the Village, to the craft fairs and demonstrations that dotted the summers and early autumn. Did you share similar experiences? Well, it is all still here and more, all waiting for your family. Whether it is through a school trip, scouts, enrollment at the onsite nature-based preschool the Dewey School, or performances hosted onsite, there is an adventure waiting at CSV for your family.

Photo courtesy of Kennis Barker.

Steeped in History

Did you know the Shakers were the subject of the second documentary Ken Burns ever made? What would compel a now famous documentarian to start his career studying a collection of old buildings on a hill a few miles outside of Concord? As Burns tell it,

I decided that my second film should explore something different about our nation’s past: something not only with a different setting, but something that touched on the deep, spiritual currents that run throughout American history and are often neglected in our rush to focus only on wars and generals and presidents.”

That’s right. Canterbury Shaker Village is home to one of the most enduring religious experiments in American history. This sect of Christianity believed in pacifism, natural health and hygiene, and though they also practiced celibacy as a community, they survived for more than 200 years and sustained settlements from Maine to Kentucky.

Why are they called Shakers? Well, their ecstatic dancing, of course! They also strove for simplicity and perfection in everything they did, building a legacy of fine furniture, serene architecture and beautiful music and dance. There is so much to learn, glean and connect to in the Shaker’s legacy.

What is wild is that the last of the Canterbury Shakers lived up until the 1990’s – maybe you (or your parents) remember meeting the Sisters in a school visit or event. It’s a past that is not quite so distant.

Photo courtesy of Londa Barker.

A Community Asset

The evolution of the Village has been amazing. It continues to find new connections with the modern world. Though the Shakers themselves have passed away, their vision for the Village continues to thrive. Today the sloped fields are rented to local cattle farmers for grazing, the gardens are utilized in a growing partnership with local grocery stores, and sap from some of the oldest sugar maples in New England are tapped and bottled for local sale.

Discover Central NH

Canterbury Shaker Village is just the beginning a visit here can be part of an all-day adventure through Central New Hampshire. The Village is a stone’s throw from incredible local breweries like the unique Canterbury Aleworks and Kettlehead Brewing Company, or head back into the city to visit Concord Craft Brewing. And, the new bourbon distillery, Cold Garden Distillery, just up the road, can’t be missed. Let the modern and old worlds collide with before or after shopping visits to the Tilton Outlets.

New Hampshire author Jodi Picoult said, “Extraordinary things are always hiding in places people never think to look.” A very true statement for everything New Hampshire. Canterbury Shaker Village exemplifies that sentiment, an extraordinary place lying right in our own backyard. Whether you come to connect with nature, history, or art, it is time you to come experience Canterbury Shaker Village for yourself.

About the Author

Kaeleigh Barker is the Director of Strategy for CCA Global in Manchester. Canterbury Shaker Village is one of her favorite places in the state – in fact, she makes her visits a family affair.


Canterbury Shaker Village

Syrup room in Canturbury Shaker Village in New Hampshire

Canterbury Shaker Village, in New Hampshire, was established by Benjamin Whitcher in 1792. A Shaker convert himself, he harbored and protected local Shakers from persecution, eventually donating the land on which the village was built. Canterbury's formal call-to-order came in the summer of 1792 with the construction of the Meeting House.

It prospered over the following century. Economic pursuits included farming, livestock breeding, mills, and the production of seeds and herbal medicines. Additionally, Elder Blinn established a small print shop, making Canterbury the publishing center for northern Shaker communities.

Canterbury resembled most other Shaker villages built at the same time. It had all of the principle buildings required of a strictly utilitarian communal society: dwelling houses, shops, stables, a laundry, a school, and an infirmary. The Meeting House, designed by Moses Johnson, played a primary role in the day-to-day functioning of the community. Today, the Canterbury Shaker Village includes 25 exceptionally well-preserved buildings surrounded by approximately 700 acres of gardens, fields, ponds, and forest.
A project through the Save America's Treasures Grant Program , which helps preserve nationally significant historic properties and collections, funded restoration work at the Canterbury Shaker in 2000. Improvements at the Canterbury Shaker Village including updating electrical, plumbing, and heating systems. Fire detection, suppression, and security systems were also installed using grant assistance.


Book signing LAUNCH event

Sunday June 25th from 1:00PM to 4:00PM @ the Canterbury Elementary School

The Historical Society is pleased to announce a “Launch Party” celebrating the publication of a new history of Canterbury which chronicles the events, people and ideas that shaped the town’s history in the 20th Century. Over 200 people were involved in the project over the span of four years. Author Kathryn Grover, a noted writer and historian, was engaged to write the history which is titled, “Staying Small in a Century of Growth”. The well known Peter Randall Publishers of Portsmouth was engaged to handle all the publishing details. Ms. Grover has produced a very readable, enjoyable and comprehensive history that stands apart from most others.

All are invited to attend the “Launch”, to hear Kathryn Grover’s story of how she wrote the history, answer questions about the book and of course, to sign copies. Books will be available that day for purchase. We look forward to seeing you there!


Photo, Print, Drawing Part of a residence at Canterbury Shaker Village, a historic site and museum in Canterbury, New Hampshire

The Library of Congress does not own rights to material in its collections. Therefore, it does not license or charge permission fees for use of such material and cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material.

Ultimately, it is the researcher's obligation to assess copyright or other use restrictions and obtain permission from third parties when necessary before publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the Library's collections.

For information about reproducing, publishing, and citing material from this collection, as well as access to the original items, see: Carol M. Highsmith - Rights and Restrictions Information

  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
  • Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-highsm-47295 (original digital file)
  • Call Number: LC-DIG-highsm- 47295 (ONLINE) [P&P]
  • Access Advisory: ---

Obtaining Copies

If an image is displaying, you can download it yourself. (Some images display only as thumbnails outside the Library of Congress because of rights considerations, but you have access to larger size images on site.)

Alternatively, you can purchase copies of various types through Library of Congress Duplication Services.

  1. If a digital image is displaying: The qualities of the digital image partially depend on whether it was made from the original or an intermediate such as a copy negative or transparency. If the Reproduction Number field above includes a reproduction number that starts with LC-DIG. then there is a digital image that was made directly from the original and is of sufficient resolution for most publication purposes.
  2. If there is information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can use the reproduction number to purchase a copy from Duplication Services. It will be made from the source listed in the parentheses after the number.

If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call Number listed above and including the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

Price lists, contact information, and order forms are available on the Duplication Services Web site.

Access to Originals

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)

  • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.
    As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)
  • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?

  • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.
  • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.


Book signing LAUNCH event

Sunday June 25th from 1:00PM to 4:00PM @ the Canterbury Elementary School

The Historical Society is pleased to announce a “Launch Party” celebrating the publication of a new history of Canterbury which chronicles the events, people and ideas that shaped the town’s history in the 20th Century. Over 200 people were involved in the project over the span of four years. Author Kathryn Grover, a noted writer and historian, was engaged to write the history which is titled, “Staying Small in a Century of Growth”. The well known Peter Randall Publishers of Portsmouth was engaged to handle all the publishing details. Ms. Grover has produced a very readable, enjoyable and comprehensive history that stands apart from most others.

All are invited to attend the “Launch”, to hear Kathryn Grover’s story of how she wrote the history, answer questions about the book and of course, to sign copies. Books will be available that day for purchase. We look forward to seeing you there!


Watch the video: Lets Visit Canterbury Shaker Village (January 2022).