Information

Picking DD- 685 - History


Picking

(DD-685: dp. 2,940 (f.); 1. 376'5", b. 39'7"; dr. 17'9", s. 35 k
cpl. 329; a. 5 5", 10 40mm., 7 20mm., 10 21" tt., 6 dep, 2 dct.; cl. Fletcher)

Picking (DD-685) was laid down 24 November 1942 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Ine., Staten Island, N.Y., Iaunched 1 June 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Sherwood Pieking, and commissioned 21 September 1943, Comdr. Raymond S. Lamb in command.

Following shakedown off Bermuda, Picking proceeded via the Panama Canal to Duteh Harbor, Alaska where she arrived 28 December 1943 to serve with the *orth Pacific Fleet, Destroyer Squadron 49. She bombarded Paramushiro, Kuriles, 4 February 1944, Matsuwa Island, Kuriles, 13 June and Paramushiro again 26 June. In August she stenmed to San Francisco, Calif. for upkeep, and then to Hawaii, arriving Pearl Harbor on the 31st where she joined the 3rd Fleet. Eseorting attack transports, she arrived at Manus Island 3 October.

Assigned to the 7th Fleet, she screened for the southern landings on Leyte 20 October. While escorting unloaded transports bound for Hollandia, New Guinea, she splashed one plane 24 October. Upon news of the Battle off Samar Island, Picking rushed to provide protection. She and Hale (DD-642) splashed one plane 25 October. After the Battle for Leyte Gulf, she escorted Mount Olympus (AGC 8) and Auriga (AK-98) to Manus Island and returned to Leyte 20 November to protect Allied convoys bringing reinforcements.

Following replenishment at Manus, Picking provided antiaireraft protection for the beachhead at Lingayen Gulf, P.I., 9 January 1945. She screened landings at San Antonio, P.I. 29 January and provided fire support and screen protection as troops went ashore on Mariveles, P.I., 15 February, and on Corregidor 16 February.

Following replenishment at Leyte, the destroyer arrived off Kerama Retto, Ryukyus, 26 March, and screened transports during landings that morning. Assigned to fire support duty 1 April, she bombarded Japanese positions on Okinawa vigorously. She splashed two enemy planes 6 April, another 9 April, and saved one Navy aviator 17 April. She rescued survivors from Longehaw (DD-559), off Naha, Okinawa, 18 May. Relieved of fire support duties 7 June, she served as a radar picket until 23 June when she sailed for Saipan.

Following her return to San Francisco at the end of the war, Picking decommissioned 20 December 1945, and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Diego.

In response to the Korean War, Picking recommissioned 26 January 1951. Following duty out of Newport, R.I., she arrived at Yokosuka, Japan, 4 May 1953. Off Korea she operated with Task Forces 77 and 95, conducting shore bombardment with 95 and saved one naval aviator. Upon completion of Korean duty, she departed Sasebo, Japan, 5 August, and proceeded via the Suez Canal to Boston arriving 2 October.

Following stateside operations in 1954, she sailed 5 January 1955 for European andMediterranean duty. Operating out of Londonderry, N. Ireland, she studied British convoy escort techniques, and then served with the 6th Fleet, before returning to Newport 26 May.

Transferred to the Pacific Fleet, she arrived at Long Beach, Calif., 15 April 1956. She departed 5 June for a tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, which included a Taiwan patrol, and returned to Long Beach 18 November. Departing Long Beaeh 13 August, she made another tour of the Far East and returned 24 January 1958. On her next WestPac deployment, 8 October 1958 to 27 March 1959, she operated with an antisubmarine hunter-killer group led by YorktouJn (CVS-10). During this tour, she carried emergency supplies to the fire-damaged Japanese town of Koniya.

In the fall she participated in antisubmarine exercises with Canadian forces off the west coast. From January to June 1960, and from August 1961 to February 1962, she made two more WestPac deployments. During the Cuban crisis of October 1962, she escorted Ranger (CVA-61). East coast operations and training filled 1963.

Deployed to the 7th Fleet 13 March 1964, she performed escort duty off Vietnam in response to the Gulf of Tonkin incident before returning to Long Beach 2 October. Sailing for WestPac 10 July 1965, she arrived at Dixie Station off Vietnam 11 September. During September and November she bombarded enemy positions in South Vietnam. She returned to Long Beach 16 December.

Following training and local operations in 1966, she departed for WestPac 27 December. She bombarded enemy military, naval, and logistical areas in North and South Vietnam, and destroyed several logistical craft in coastal waters off North Vietnam. Training off the west coast in antisubmarine warfare and gunnery completed 1967. In February 1968 she departed for WestPac, and arrived at Yankee Station 25 April. Following gunfire support duty off South Vietnam and a return to Yankee Station, she arrived Long Beach 17 August.

Following duties with thePacific Fleet in 1969, Picking decommissioned 6 September 1969 at Long Beach, Calif., and entered the Reserve Fleet.

Picking received 5 battle stars for World War II service. and one battle star for Korean service.


USS Picking (DD 685)

Decommissioned 20 December 1945.
Recommissioned 26 January 1951.
Decommissioned 4 December 1969.
Stricken 1 March 1975.
Sunk as a target in June 1976.

Commands listed for USS Picking (DD 685)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1T/Capt. Raymond Starr Lamb, USN21 Sep 194312 Aug 1944
2T/Cdr. Benedict Joseph Semmes, Jr., USN12 Aug 194415 Aug 1945
3T/Cdr. Charles Thomas Mauro, Jr., USN15 Aug 194520 Dec 1945

You can help improve our commands section
Click here to Submit events/comments/updates for this vessel.
Please use this if you spot mistakes or want to improve this ships page.

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Picking DD- 685 - History

  • Isherwood (DD 520), Kimberly (DD 521), Luce (DD 522), Charles J. Badger (DD 657) and Picking (DD 685), square-bridge ships from Bethlehem Staten Island, commissioned from April through July and September 1943.
  • Sproston (DD 577), Wickes (DD 578), William D. Porter (DD 579) and Young (DD 580), round-brudge ships and the last four destroyers built at Consolidated Shipbuilding, Orange, Texas, commissioned between May and July 1943.

OPERATIONS

Destroyer Squadron 49
World War II Operations

Kimberly joined the Pacific Fleet in time to participate in the Gilbert Islands operation. After returning to San Francisco in January 1944, she joined the other ships of her squadron in the Aleutians.

Operating from Massacre Bay, Attu from the beginning of 1944 through midsummer, the squadron participated in two raids. In March, it screened light cruiser Richmond in the first operation into the Sea of Okhotsk to search for a convoy and conduct shore bombardment, but ran into a major storm which cause topside damage to several ships. In June, it sortied again in the screen of cruisers Chester, Pensacola and Concord for a bombardment of Paramushiro Island off the tip of the Kamchatka Peninsula.

After overhaul, the squadron joined other forces at Manus for the invasion of the Philippines at Leyte and remained intact for the landings at Lingayen Gulf, Luzon. Less Kimberly and William D. Porter, the squadron then operated out of Subic Bay for the operation against Corregidor and other defenses of Manila Bay.

After Manila was taken, Young followed the Seventh Fleet south to Mindanao while the remainder of the squadron moved north to Okinawa for fire support and radar picket duty before returning to San Francisco at the end of the war.

LOSSES

&bull On 4 May 1945, Luce was hit by a bomb from one suicide plane and immediately crashed by another and sank with a loss of 126 officers and men.

&bull On 10 June 1945, William D. Porter was lost after a suicide plane splashed nearby but exploded beneath her, opening her seams. No lives were lost.


1951 – 1969 [ edit | edit source ]

In response to the Korean War, Picking recommissioned 26 January 1951. Following duty out of Newport, R.I., she arrived at Yokosuka, Japan, 4 May 1953. Off Korea she operated with Task Forces 77 and 95, conducting shore bombardment with 95 and saved one naval aviator. Upon completion of Korean duty, she departed Sasebo, Japan, 5 August, and proceeded via the Suez Canal to Boston arriving 2 October.

Following stateside operations in 1954, she sailed 5 January 1955 for European and Mediterranean duty. Operating out of Derry, Northern Ireland, she studied British convoy escort techniques, and then served with the 6th Fleet, before returning to Newport 26 May.

Transferred to the Pacific Fleet, she arrived at Long Beach, California, 15 April 1956. She departed 5 June for a tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, which included a Taiwan patrol, and returned to Long Beach 18 November. Departing Long Beach 13 August, she made another tour of the Far East, and returned 24 January 1958. On her next WestPac deployment, 8 October 1958 to 27 March 1959, she operated with an antisubmarine hunter-killer group led by Yorktown (CVS-10). During this tour, she carried emergency supplies to the fire-damaged Japanese town of Koniya. In the fall she participated in antisubmarine exercises with Canadian forces off the west coast. From January to June 1960, and from August 1961 to February 1962, she made two more WestPac deployments. During the Cuban missile crisis of October 1962, she escorted Ranger (CVA-61). East coast operations and training filled 1963.

Deployed to the 7th Fleet 13 March 1964, she performed escort duty off Vietnam in response to the Gulf of Tonkin incident before returning to Long Beach 2 October. Sailing for WestPac 10 July 1965, she arrived at Dixie Station off Vietnam 11 September. During September and November, she bombarded enemy positions in South Vietnam. She returned to Long Beach 16 December. Following training and local operations in 1966, she departed for WestPac 27 December. She bombarded enemy military, naval, and logistical areas in North and South Vietnam, and destroyed several logistical craft in coastal waters off North Vietnam. Training off the west coast in antisubmarine warfare and gunnery completed 1967. In February 1968 she departed for WestPac, and arrived at Yankee Station 25 April. Following gunfire support duty off South Vietnam and a return to Yankee Station, she arrived Long Beach 17 August.

Following duties with the Pacific Fleet in 1969, Picking decommissioned 6 September 1969 at Long Beach, Calif., and entered the Reserve Fleet. Ώ] She was stricken from the Navy list 1 March 1975, and sunk as a target 27 February 1997.

Picking received 5 battle stars for World War II service. and one battle star for Korean service.


1951 – 1969

In response to the Korean War, Picking recommissioned 26 January 1951. Following duty out of Newport, R.I., she arrived at Yokosuka, Japan, 4 May 1953. Off Korea she operated with Task Forces 77 and 95, conducting shore bombardment with 95 and saved one naval aviator. Upon completion of Korean duty, she departed Sasebo, Japan, 5 August, and proceeded via the Suez Canal to Boston arriving 2 October.

Following stateside operations in 1954, she sailed 5 January 1955 for European and Mediterranean duty. Operating out of Derry, Northern Ireland, she studied British convoy escort techniques, and then served with the 6th Fleet, before returning to Newport 26 May.

Transferred to the Pacific Fleet, she arrived at Long Beach, California, 15 April 1956. She departed 5 June for a tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, which included a Taiwan patrol, and returned to Long Beach 18 November. Departing Long Beach 13 August, she made another tour of the Far East, and returned 24 January 1958. On her next WestPac deployment, 8 October 1958 to 27 March 1959, she operated with an antisubmarine hunter-killer group led by Yorktown (CVS-10). During this tour, she carried emergency supplies to the fire-damaged Japanese town of Koniya. In the fall she participated in antisubmarine exercises with Canadian forces off the west coast. From January to June 1960, and from August 1961 to February 1962, she made two more WestPac deployments. During the Cuban missile crisis of October 1962, she escorted Ranger (CVA-61). East coast operations and training filled 1963.

Deployed to the 7th Fleet 13 March 1964, she performed escort duty off Vietnam in response to the Gulf of Tonkin incident before returning to Long Beach 2 October. Sailing for WestPac 10 July 1965, she arrived at Dixie Station off Vietnam 11 September. During September and November, she bombarded enemy positions in South Vietnam. She returned to Long Beach 16 December. Following training and local operations in 1966, she departed for WestPac 27 December. She bombarded enemy military, naval, and logistical areas in North and South Vietnam, and destroyed several logistical craft in coastal waters off North Vietnam. Training off the west coast in antisubmarine warfare and gunnery completed 1967. In February 1968 she departed for WestPac, and arrived at Yankee Station 25 April. Following gunfire support duty off South Vietnam and a return to Yankee Station, she arrived Long Beach 17 August.

Following duties with the Pacific Fleet in 1969, Picking decommissioned 6 September 1969 at Long Beach, Calif., and entered the Reserve Fleet. [ 1 ] She was stricken from the Navy list 1 March 1975, and sunk as a target 27 February 1997.

Picking received 5 battle stars for World War II service. and one battle star for Korean service.


World War II Era

During the World War II era, the yard substantially expanded with the help of $6 million provided by the U.S. Navy, gaining the capacity to build vessel up to 516 feet, and able to perform repairs on even larger vessels, added thousands of personnel from the Staten Island area and beyond, with up to 12,000 working the yard to support the war effort and the ongoing demand for ships.

Personnel were working around the clock, with a 24-hour schedule to speed production. The company hired and trained thousands, both men and women, as sheet metal workers, welders, painters, electricians, pipefitters, machinists and other trades.

During this era, the yard built 47 destroyers, 75 landing craft, 5 cargo vessels and 3 tugs. After the war ended, demand for shipbuilding was heavily scaled back, and the shipyard continued to operate, building the Staten Island Ferry between the years of 1950 – 1951, the fastest ferry of its generation, capable of carrying 700 more passengers than the prior ferries.

The company then reverted to building tugs and barges, finally ending operations completely in 1960. The yard is now the site of May Ship Repair, that has recently begun constructing barges at the former location of the Staten Island Shipyard.


Picking DD- 685 - History

April 1953 - October 1953 World/Korean Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Picking DD 685 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: Panama Canal, San Diego, pearl Harbor, Midway Island, Yokosuka and Sasebo Japan, Hong Kong, Saigon, Trincomalee Ceylon, Aden Arabia, Suez Canal, Port Said, Egypt, Izmir Turkey, Naples Italy, Cannes France, Argentina Newfoundland and Boston
  • Korean War Operations
  • Divisional Group Photos
  • Crossing the Equator
  • Crew Roster (Name, Rank and Hometown)
  • Many Crew Activity Photos
  • Plus Much More

Over 290 Photos on Approximately 157 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.


Navy Ships Agent Orange Exposure List (crew may have been exposed) To view the full document click on the Link above

Week of August 09, 2010
The Department of Veterans Affairs Compensation and Pension Service has issued two lists of naval vessels it has verified conducted operations on the inland "brown water" rivers and delta areas of Vietnam. The lists also identify certain vessel types that operated primarily on the inland waterways. If a veteran's service aboard one of these ships can be confirmed through military records during the time frames specified, then exposure to herbicide agents (e.g., Agent Orange) can be presumed. The lists include all vessels of Inshore Fire Support Division 93 all vessels with the designation LST, LCVP, PCF ("Swift Boats"), and PBR during their entire Vietnam tour all Coast Guard WPBs and WHECs during their Vietnam tours. Several other vessels and time frames of operations are included in these lists. See January 2010 ship listing * (PDF) and June 2010 Updated Ship List ** (DOC). If you served on any of these mentioned ships and you have had a claim denied, you should reapply citing the VA list as the source for your reapplication. National Association of Uniformed Serveices has been told the VA is already working on a third list that will have more ships listed. If you have a claim and evidence the ship you served on was in Vietnamese waters and/or actually tied up to a dock there, make sure you include that with your claim.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Compensation & Pension Service
Bulletin

I have taken the pertinent information from the Bulletin and placed a condensed version in the Table below .
Read the Table: Left column then Right Column then Down
Left column then Right Column then Down and so on.

o Fiduciary Teleconference
o VA Form 21-7288(a), Daily Record of
Veterans Assistance Interviews
o Congressional Correspondence
o Homeless Veterans
____________________________________________________

Policy (211)
Information on Vietnam Naval Operations
Compensation and Pension (C&P) Service has
initiated a program to collect data on Vietnam
naval operations for the purpose of providing
regional offices with information to assist with
development in Haas related disability claims
based on herbicide exposure from Navy
Veterans. To date, we have received verification
from various sources showing that a number of
offshore “blue water” naval vessels conducted
operations on the inland “brown water” rivers
and delta areas of Vietnam. We have also
identified certain vessel types that operated
primarily or exclusively on the inland
waterways. The ships and dates of inland
waterway service are listed below. If a
Veteran’s service aboard one of these ships can
be confirmed through military records during the
time frames specified, then exposure to herbicide
agents can be presumed without further
development.
All vessels of Inshore Fire Support [IFS]
Division 93 during their entire Vietnam tour
USS Carronade (IFS 1)
USS Clarion River (LSMR 409) [Landing Ship,Medium, Rocket]

USS Ingersoll (DD-652) [Destroyer] [Operated
on Saigon River, October 24-25, 1965]

USS Mansfield (DD-728) [Destroyer] [Operated
on Saigon River August 8-19, 1967 and
December 21-24, 1968]

USS Richard E. Kraus (DD-849) [Destroyer]
[Operated on coastal inlet north of Da Nang,
June 2-5, 1966, protecting Marines holding a
bridge]

USS Basilone (DD-824) [Destroyer] [Operated
on Saigon River, May 24-25, 1966]

USS Hamner (DD-718) [Destroyer] [Operated
on Song Lon Tao and Long Song Tao Rivers,
August 15-September 1, 1966]

USS Black (DD-666) [Destroyer] [Operated on
Saigon River, July 13-19, 1966]

USS Providence (CLG-6) [Cruiser, Light,
Guided Missile] [Operated on Saigon River 3
days during January 1964]

USS Mahan (DLG-11) [Guided Missile Frigate]
[Operated on Saigon River October 24-28, 1964]

USS Okanogan (APA-220) [Attack Transport]
[Operated on Saigon River July 22-23, 29-30,
1968 and August 5-6, 1968]

USS Niagara Falls (AFS-3) [Combat Stores
Ship] [Unloaded supplies on Saigon River and
Cam Rahn Bay, April 22-25, 1968]

Procedures (212)
BDN Automated CRSC/CRDP Payments
Discontinued
A recent review revealed that the automated
Combat-Related Special Compensation (CRSC)
and Concurrent Retirement and Disability Pay
(CRDP) payments that were still being made on
some BDN cases were resulting in
overpayments. Therefore, that process was
discontinued. Accordingly, all BDN
CRSC/CRDP payments will be made through
the Audit Error Worksheet (AEW) process. As
with all AEWs, Virtual VA (VVA) and TINQ
(Treasure Inquiry) should be checked for prior
payments before processing.

Fast Letter 10-03, Chapter 35 Benefits for
Dependents of Servicemembers

benefits) under Public Law 109-461. Section
301 of the law allows the Department of
Veterans Affairs (VA) to pay DEA benefits to
dependents of severely disabled servicemembers
who are pending discharge from the military.
Eligible dependents may now receive DEA
benefits before servicemembers are discharged.
The new category of eligible persons includes
the spouses and children of active duty
servicemembers who at the time of VA’s
decision:
· are hospitalized or receiving outpatient
medical care, services, or treatment
· have a total disability permanent in nature,
incurred or aggravated in the line of duty in
the active military, naval, or air service and
· are likely to be discharged or released from
service for the disability.

Fast Letter 09-52, Verification of
Participation in “Special Operations”
Incidents

On December 9, 2009 C&P Service released
Fast Letter 09-52, Verification of Participation
in “Special Operations” Incidents. This fast
letter provides instructions for verifying a
Veteran’s involvement in Special Operations
Forces classified missions or obtaining related
classified documents.

Correcting Erroneous Diagnostic Codes for
Undiagnosed Illness

Members of a Gulf War Veterans Information
Systems (GWVIS) Work Group have identified
many records, potentially involving qualifying
chronic disabilities associated with service in
Southwest Asia, with erroneous diagnostic
codes. These errors can negatively impact the
quality of the GWVIS reports which are
provided to stakeholders who monitor Gulf War
Veterans’ use of Compensation and Pension

The most common errors involve misplacement
of the diagnostic codes in the 8800 series and/or
misuse of the analogous codes XX99. While
RBA2000 prevents these errors from occurring
in current ratings, the errors still exist in ratings
completed prior to RBA2000. RVSRs should be
reminded that before signing a new rating
decision, they must verify the accuracy of the
entire codesheet, including previously entered
diagnostic codes (per M21-1MR III.iv.6.D.20).
RVSRs and Authorizers are asked to pay
particular attention to previous ratings involving
any Undiagnosed Illness or any medically
unexplained chronic multisymptom illness, to
ensure that all diagnostic codes have been input
correctly according to M21-1MR IV.ii.2.D.16.dg.
When errors are identified, action must be
taken to correct the hyphenated codes.

Training & Contract Exams (213)

Skill Certification Tests

The next VSR Skills Certification test will be
given on February 10, 2010. VSRs who have
completed the VSR training curriculum, are
meeting the local trainee performance standard,
and have one year time in grade as a GS-10 are
eligible to take this test.

The next Journey-Level Rating Veteran Service
Representative (RVSR) Certification test is
scheduled for February 24, 2010. To be eligible
to take the test, RVSRs must be at the GS 12
level or above, be meeting the local performance
standard, and have been an RVSR for at least 24
months.

Homeless Veterans
In an excerpt from Secretary’s Shinseki’s speech
given at the November 2009 Homeless Veteran
Summit in Washington, DC, the
Secretary stated, “Those who have served this
nation as Veterans should never find themselves
on the streets, living without care and without hope.”

There are 131,000 Veterans estimated tobe homeless on
any given night.
The Secretary is committed to ending homelessness
among Veterans within the next five years. We find
ourselves with an enormous challenge, and we
must do our part to help reach that goal.
As part of our efforts to end homelessness
among Veterans within five
years, Regional Offices increased the number of
homeless Veterans claims received and
processed during the first quarter in FY 2010.
The following data shows the number of
homeless Veterans claims received and
processed in FY 2010 against FY 2009.

. Homeless Veteran Claims
. FY 2009 1st Quarter .
Received . 1,281 . Processed . 1,292 . Received .. FY 2010 1st Quarter
Received . 2,187 . Processed . 1,756

In comparing the data from the first quarter of
FY 2010 to the first quarter of FY 2009, there
was a 70.7% increase in the number of homeless
Veterans claims received and a 26.4%
increase in the number of homeless Veterans
claims processed.
Although the above numbers show a very
positive trend, there is still a great deal of work
to be done. The goal to eliminate homelessness
among Veterans will only be accomplished
through targeted, meaningful outreach, expedited
claims processing, and a true commitment by
every VA employee.
As a reminder to the regional offices, please
ensure that all homeless Veterans claims are
marked with the “Homeless Flash” in
VETSNET

VA Adds Ships to Agent Orange Exposure List
This week the VA has added the below named ships to the already existing list for Navy and Coast Guard ships and vessels that are presumed to have been exposed to Agent Orange. If you served on any of these mentioned ships and you have had a claim denied, you should reapply citing the VA list as the source for your reapplication. NAUS is told the VA is already working on a third list that will have more ships listed. If you have a claim and evidence the ship you served on was in Vietnamese waters and/or actually tied up to a dock there, make sure you include that with your claim.

Vessels that operated primarily or exclusively on the inland waterways

All U.S. Coast Guard Cutters with hull designation WPB [patrol boat] and
WHEC [high endurance cutters]

USS Mark (AKL-12) [light cargo ship] USS Brule (AKL-28)

USS Patapsco (AOG-1) [gasoline tanker] USS Elkhorn (AOG-7)
USS Genesee (AOG-8) USS Kishwaukee (AOG-9)
USS Tombigbee (AOG-11) USS Noxubee (AOG-56)

USS Okanogan
(APA-210) [attack transport] USS Montrose (APA-212)
USS Bexar (APA-237)

USS Benewah (APB-35) [self-propelled barracks ship] USS Colleton (APB-36)
USS Mercer (APB-39) USS Nueces (APB-40)

Barracks Barge (APL-26) [sleeping quarters] ) Barracks Barge (APL-30)

USS Tutuila (ARG-4) [repair ship] USS Satyr (ARL-23) [repair ship]
USS Sphinx (ARL-24) USS Askari (ARL-30) USS Indra (ARL-37)
USS Krishna (ARL-38)

USS Belle Grove (LSD-2) [landing ship dock] USS Comstock (LSD-19)
USS Tortuga (LSD-26)

USS Asheville (PG-84) [patrol gunboat] USS Gallop (PG-85)
USS Antelope (PG-86) USS Ready (PG-87) USS Crockett (PG-88)
USS Marathon (PG-89) USS Canon (PG-90)

Floating Base Platform (YRBM-17) [repair, berthing, and messing barge]
Floating Base Platform (YRBM-18) Floating Base Platform (YRBM-20)

Winnemucca (YTB-785) [harbor tug]


Vessels that operated temporarily on Vietnam's inland waterways or
docked to the shore:

USS Card (ACV-11) [escort carrier] mined, sunk, and salvaged in Saigon
River Harbor during May 1964
USS Maury (AGS-16) [mapping survey ship] conducted surveys of Mekong
Delta and other coastal areas and rivers beginning November 1965 through
1969
USS Henrico (APA-45) [amphibious attack transport] operated on Hue River
during March 1965 and conducted numerous troop landings through March
1967
USS Montrose (APA-212) operated on Song Hue River during December 1965,
operated on Long Tau River during March 1967, and operated on Cua Viet
River and at Dong Ha during May 1967
USS Talladega (APA-208) operated on Saigon River during October 1967

USS Bolster (ARS-38) [salvage ship] crew operated on land.
USS Canberra (CAG-2) [guided missile cruiser] operated on Saigon River
from March 31 through April 1, 1966, on Cua Viet River during December
15, 1966, and on Mekong Delta Ham Luong River during January 15, 1967
USS Sproston (DD-577) [destroyer] operated on Mekong Delta and Ganh Rai
Bay during January 1966
USS Picking (DD-685) operated on Saigon River during November 16, 1965
USS Epperson (DD-719) docked to Da Nang Pier on October 4, 1970
USS Southerland (DD-743) operated on Song Nga Bay and Saigon River
during July 1966
USS John W. Thomason (DD-760) operated on Nga Be River during 1969
USS Buck (DD-761) operated on Mekong River Delta and Saigon River during
October 1966
USS Preston (DD-795) operated on Mekong River Delta, Ganh Rai Bay, and
Saigon River during September 28 - 29 and December 27 - 29, 1965
USS Warrington (DD-843) operated on Mekong River Delta Rung Sat Special
Zone, North of Vung Gahn Rai Bay during March 1967
USS Dyess (DD-880) operated on Saigon River and Rung Sat Special Zone
from June 19-July 1, 1966
USS Perkins (DD-877) operated on Saigon River during June 1969
USS Orleck (DD-886) operated on Mekong River Delta during July 1969
USS Joseph Strauss (DDG-16) [guided missile destroyer] operated on
Mekong River Delta and Ganh Rai Bay during November 7 and December 7,
1968
USS Waddell (DDG-24) operated on Cua Viet River during March 1967
USS Newell (DER-322) [radar destroyer escort] docked at port of Nha
Trang during December 22-24, 1965
USS Duluth (LPD-6) [amphibious transport dock] docked to pier at Da Nang
during March and October 1971
USS Cleveland (LPD-7) operated on Cua Viet River and at Dong Ha, as well
as Hue River, from November 1967 through 1968 and Saigon River during
September 1969
USS Dubuque (LPD-8) docked at Da Nang on March 15, 1970
USS Boxer (LPH-4) [amphibious assault ship] docked to pier at Cam Rahn Bay on September 9, 1965
USS Carter Hall (LSD-3) [landing ship dock] operated on Cua Viet River and at Dong Ha during December 1967


Physical Examination

The primary purpose of the physical examination is to identify causes of secondary headaches. The examination should target areas identified as abnormal during the headache history. The general physical examination should include vital signs, funduscopic and cardiovascular assessment, and palpation of the head and face.

A complete neurologic examination is essential, and the findings must be documented. The examination should include mental status, level of consciousness, cranial nerve testing, pupillary responses, motor strength testing, deep tendon reflexes, sensation, pathologic reflexes (e.g. Babinski's sign), cerebellar function and gait testing, and signs of meningeal irritation (Kernig's and Brudzinski's signs). Particular attention should be given to detecting problems related to the optic, oculomotor, trochlear and abducens nerves (cranial nerves II, III, IV and VI, respectively).


What Did Queen Victoria Do That Was Important?

Queen Victoria established the modern role of a monarch in a constitutional monarchy and exerted her influence to promote the British Empire's expansion and reforms benefiting the poor, according to the website of The British Monarchy. During her 67-year reign of Britain, the Empire experienced immense social, political and industrial change. Her longevity, combined with her grace and reclusive nature, led to her becoming a national icon of moral strictness.

Queen Victoria ruled during a time when the British monarch held little real political power. Nevertheless, she used her title and personality to influence public affairs as she saw fit. The effects of her behind-the-scenes politicking were observable in foreign policy. Victoria successfully pressed her ministers to avoid involving the nation in the Prussia-Austria-Denmark War, thereby saving Britain from the costs of massive military engagement. According to the official website of The British Monarchy, Victoria prevented a Franco-German war in 1875 by writing a persuasive letter to the Emperor of Germany, whose son had married her daughter.

Through a personal relationship with Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli, Queen Victoria indirectly shaped the foreign policy that made Britain a world empire. During her reign, the Crown took over rule of India from the East India Company the Royal Titles Act made Victoria Empress of India.

Victoria also supported a number of acts that democratized the country, including the establishment of the secret ballot, easing of voting requirements and enacting of wage increases for the working class.


Watch the video: Martin Brophy Oral and Video History Collection (January 2022).