Information

Peregrine AM-373 - History


Peregrine

(AM-373: dp. 890; 1. 221'1"; b. 32'2"; dr. 10'9"; s. 18 k.;
cpl. 117; a. 1 3", 2 40mm; cl. Auk)

Peregrine (AM-373) was laid down by the Savannah Machine and Foundry Co., Savannah, Gal, 24 October 1944; launched 17 February 1945; sponsored by Mrs. Ethel K. Adams; and commissioned 27 September 1945, Comdr. Carl R. Cunningham, Jr. in command.

After fitting out at the Charleston Navy Yard, Charleston and shakedown in Chesapeake Bay, Peregrine became sehooi ship at the Naval Mine Warfare Sehool, Yorktown.

From 1945 to 1951 she conducted daily minesweeping operations in Yorktown, Va., Charleston, S.C., and Norfolk, Va. and also conducted tests on anti-roll gear, and other tests of an experimental nature.

Peregrine spent most of the years from 1951 to 1955 operating out of Norfolk with cruises as far south as Balboa, Canal Zone and as far north as Argentia, Newfoundland. On 7 February 1955 she became MSF-373. On 9 September 1955 she departed Key West, Fla., for Port Lysutey, North Africa. She operated off Casablanea and ealled at Gibraltar before sailing for Bermuda and Key West, Fla., arriving at that homeport 8 December.

From 1955 to 1960 Peregrine operated out of Key West, Fla., as far south as Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and Cuidad Trujillo, Dominican Republie, and as far north as New York City. On 24 June Peregrine departed for special operations near St. Johns Harbor, New Brunswiek, Canada.

Peregrine departed the Key West area again 31 July 1361 enroute to Argentia, Newfoundland, returning 5 October. During November 1962, while serving under ComServLant Peregrine escorted Orford in patrol off Havana, Cuba, during the ~uban crisis.

During 1963 Peregrine was involved in a mapping project from Bermuda to Argentia, Newfoundland and alifax, Nova Seotia, during which time she did not see her homeport for five months. On 25 February 1964 the ship's designation was changed from Experimental Fleet Mine Sweeper (EMSF373) to general auxiliary (AG-176). Her new designator refleeted her operational task of full time testing and evaluating of experimental equipment prior to incorporation of the equipment into other ships of the fleet. In February 1965 Peregrine departed Key West for a South Atlantic cruise to eonduet independent project operations. After a return to Key West Peregrine entered Rosyth, Seotland, 20 May. On 27 May Peregrine gained her "Blue Nose" as she crossed the Aretie Cirele. For most of the rest of the year Peregrine participated in elassified oceanographic operations in the Norwegian Sea. She visited Bremerhaven, Germany, 21-25 October, returning to Key West 10 November.

In early 1966 Peregrine participated in the testing of an experimental oceanographic survey method in Bermuda operating areas. In late 1966 Peregrine was deployed to the North Atlantic on special operations, operating out of Argentia, Newfoundland.

On 1 March 1967 Peregrine got underway from Key West for the Panama Canal which she transited S-6 March, reaching her new homeport of San Francisco 16 March. She depurted San Francisco 25 Mnreh, reaching Pearl Harbor 1 Apri1. She departed 4 April for Yokosuka, Japan, where she conducted project operations. September and October were spent conducting operations out of Midway. After further operations out of Hawaii, the ship returned to San Francisco 28 November.

Peregrine decommissioned 31 January 1969. She was struck from the Navy List 1 February 1969.


Learn about peregrine falcons

Common name: Peregrine falcon
Scientific name: Falco peregrinus
Size: Males: 15–18 inches in length with a 35–42-inch wingspan females: 18–20 inches in length with a 42–48-inch wingspan
Range: Every continent except Antarctica
Conservation status: Special concern in MA, not listed federally
Fun fact: Fastest bird on Earth with dive speeds over 240 mph


News from the Nesting Box - 2021

June 17 - As of this morning we were able to see that the adults, Hattie and Orton, and three of the four fledglings were flying high above the downtown Rochester campus. The fledglings are now becoming more adept with their flight skills, chasing each other and their parents and making attempts at catching their first prey. It will still be several weeks before the fledglings will be successful in catching their own meals but the adults are always nearby, watching and providing food for them. The best time to see them on camera is early morning and later afternoon when they roost for the night near or in the nest box. Here you can see one of the fledglings on top of the nest box early this morning.

June 14 - All four fledges were back at the nest box last evening, as seen in this photo taken at 8:49 p.m. The fledges typically have left the nest box by sunrise each day. Pippin and Hailey spend the most time roosting at night in the box, where they feel safe.

June 9 - This photo was taken at 9 p.m. and shows all four the fledgings doing fine -- three in the box and one on the top, enjoying the view!

June 8 - As you can see from this photo, even though the chicks have fledged, they are still quite near the nest box. Notice the birds on the far left.

June 8 - Hailey fledged early this morning, before 5:30 a.m., leaving Avalon as the only occupant of the nest box (see photo). Avalon followed suit and fledged shortly after 7:30 a.m. If you look closely at the second photo, you'll see one of the fledglings on the roof of the nest box. It's very likely that Hailey and Avalon are staying close by, at least for a while.

June 7 - All four chicks are back in the nest box (as of 4 p.m.) Do you think the chicks are all looking at the same thing? It could be that they are looking at one of their parents, some prey, or a butterfly or another insect. Everything is interesting to them at this stage.

June 7 - All four of the chicks are doing well. This photo, taken about 7 a.m., shows Pippin on the roof of the nest box, while Altezza, Hailey and Avalon spend time on the deck. The females have not yet attempted to fledge.

June 4 - This photo shows that Pippin has returned to the nest box, spending time both in and on it, obviously capturing the attention of one of his sisters.

June 4 - We have fledge! Altezza, one of the male chicks, fledged at 5:22 a.m. today (see below), followed soon after by the other male, Pippin. The birds are probably very near the nest box in fact, you may see one or both perched on one of the structures behind the box. The female chicks, Hailey and Avalon, remain in the nest box but could fledge any day.

Some viewers are concerned about the change in feeding habits observed recently. Orton and Hattie have continued to bring food to the nest box but now just drop it for the chicks to tussle over and consume. This is a natural and important part of what the chicks need to learn they no longer need to be fed directly by the adults. Raptors, like these peregrine falcons, consume much of the water they need through the food they eat. The chicks have been well-fed since hatch, so they are well-hydated, too.

June 1 - Look how the chicks have grown and changed in appearance in just a few days. Here they are shown on the deck of the nest box, scanning the sky and waiting to be fed. They have only a few tufts of their white downy feathers still visible. The temperatures will be reaching the upper 80s and 90s in Rochester as the week continues, so you may see the chicks doing more open mouth breathing. We know this is concerning to see but they are actually doing well. The chicks can also retreat to the shade of the box if they get too warm. This is another reason why nest boxes are never facing west we don't want the birds to get excessive sun without a place to retreat to.

May 26 - All lined up and ready for their photo op! Photo taken around 2 p.m. CDT.

May 26 - These four chicks are getting bigger and bolder, spending more and more time on the nest box deck and even flapping their wings. They are now nearly 50% brown in color as their downy fluff gives way to feathers.

This photo offers a better look at the brown color of the feathers. Notice the shadow of an adult peregrine on the left side.

May 24 - It's one week post-banding, and the four chicks continue to grow and change in appearance. They are also venturing out on the deck of the nest box, becoming more curious about the world beyond their immediate surroundings.

May 17 - It was an eventful morning for the peregrine falcon family at Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

At around 10 a.m., the four chicks were removed from the nest box atop the Mayo Building and carried to a conference room for a physical exam, banding and naming. Jackie Fallon, Midwest Peregrine Society, banded the chicks and stated that all four are healthy and doing well. Names for the chicks were drawn from more than 800 submitted, and we're pleased to announce their names: females Hailey and Avalon males Altezza and Pippin.

Each chick received a federal band on its right leg and a colored identification band on its left leg. The colored bands are more easily read than the federal bands so they are most helpful when trying to identify birds at a distance. The banding information for the four chicks is as follows: Hailey (female) - black over blue, band 23/X Altezza (male) - black over blue, band 77/D Avalon (female) - black over blue, band 24/X Pippin (male) - black over blue, band 78/D. This information will be entered into the Midwest Peregrine Society database along with the chicks' names, banding date and other documentation.

Hattie and Orton aggressively defended the area near the nest box (below) as the chicks were removed and later returned. Team members with brooms protected the others from possible attack by the determined parents.

May 13 - This photo shows how, even when we can't see the adults on camera, at least one of them is usually nearby. Do you see the feathers of the adult on the left side of the photo? The adult is perched on the arm of the camera, keeping an eye on the youngsters in the nest box.

May 10 - One week away from our banding/naming event for these four fast-growing youngsters! We hope you can tune in on May 17 at 10 a.m. CDT via Facebook Live. We will also post a recording of the event on this site later that day.

May 6 - Four hungry chicks at feeding time, 3 p.m. CDT.

May 4 - Here's our falcon family, at 10:07 a.m. CDT.

May 3 - Feeding time at 5:45 p.m. CDT!

May 3 - Taken at 9 a.m. CDT, this photo shows the four chicks huddled near the middle of the nest box. The outdoor temperature is 55 degrees.

May 3 - This photo, taken on May 1, shows a black "mark" on the head of one of the chicks. Later observations showed that another chick has a similar mark. We're not certain what this is it may be some debris. However, all four chicks appear to be doing well, and the last-hatched chick is catching up to its siblings in growth.

April 30 - In the first photo below, taken this morning, Hatttie is shading the chicks from the sun's heat. Even though the temperature is only in the 50s, the direct sun is warm and the chicks can't thermoregulate at this stage, so the adults do it for them.

This photo of feeding time today shows how quickly the chicks are growing. They are now double their hatch size!

April 28 - Fun family photo of Orton (toward the back) and Hattie, brooding the chicks.

April 27 - 2:15 p.m. - This photo shows the four chicks huddled toward the front of the nest box. The temperature is 53 degrees so they are comfortable for a few minutes on their own. Moments later, Hattie returned.

April 27 - The fourth egg hatched this morning, sometime between 6:40 and 9:00 a.m. The first photo below shows today's 10 a.m. feeding, with the newest arrival on the far left, behind its siblings, and the egg shell remaining nearby.

The photo below shows Hattie brooding all four chicks. The new arrivals will be brooded by the adults and fed every 2-3 hours. The chicks cannot stay warm on their own for another few days, depending on the weather. Don't be alarmed if the parents aren't covering their chicks for a minute or two when the weather cooperates. What happens to the eggshells? Hattie and Orton will remove them from the nest box.

April 26 - Three of the chicks hatched yesterday. As of 7:00 a.m. today, one egg remains and should hatch sometime today. Orton is doing a great job of delivering prey to the nest box for Hattie to feed the chicks. Both adults are brooding the chicks in between feedings.

April 25 - We have hatch! As of 6 a.m., one of the chicks had fully hatched and two were pipping (broken a small hole in its shell) and those two should hatch sometime today. In the photo below, you can see a piece of an egg shell toward the front of the nest box.

The first photo below shows Orton bringing food to the nest box. It is now his job to bring sufficient food to the nest box, and Hattie's job to feed the chicks.

In this photo you can clearly see the eggs pipping - the first breaks in the shell as the chicks begin to hatch - and the first chick that has already emerged. Note the broken piece of egg shell moved toward the front of the box.

April 14 - The weather in Rochester has been chilly this week. The temperature at 11:30 a.m. is only 33 degrees. But Hattie and Orton faithfully continue to incubate their four eggs. We anticipate hatch to begin around April 26-27.

April 8 - The photo below, taken at about 7:30 a.m., shows Orton taking his turn incubating the egg, making sure to delicately turn them with his beak.

April 6 - Viewers expressed concerned today after noticing that Hattie had left the nest box this morning. Mayo Clinic Facilities staff had to be on the roof to correct issues with the air conditioning unit seen in the background. Hattie stayed nearby and kept a watchful eye on the situtation. We are monitoring the scene and we don't expect any negative impact on the clutch of eggs.

March 31 - Here's a great photo showing the "incubation exchange." It's Hattie's turn for a break so Orton will take over in the nest box for a while.

March 26 - The morning sun is streaming into the nest box where Hattie is incubating four eggs. If all goes well, we can expect hatch in about 31 days.

March 24 - Hattie and Orton are now tending to four eggs in the nest box. This photo was taken at approximately 1:30 pm. It&rsquos blurry due to rain in the Rochester area.

March 22 - This photo, taken at 9:00 am, shows three eggs in the nest box.

March 19 - Hattie laid her second egg at approximately10:30 this morning. Now we may see Hattie and Orton taking turns tending to the eggs in the nest box, but there will be times when neither bird sits on the eggs. Don't be concerned Hattie will begin incubating the eggs after she lays her next-to-last egg. This timing helps all the eggs develop at roughly the same time to hatch in about five weeks.

March 16 - We have our first egg! This is the earliest date on which peregrines at Mayo have had eggs.

March 15 - Hattie spent some time in the nest box during the snowstorm that swept through Rochester and the surrounding area.

March 12 - This photo shows Hattie and Orton in the nest box.

March 12 - Viewers may have observed a tussle between Hattie and an unidentified female earlier this week. The photo (below right), taken around 10 a.m. today, shows Hattie at the nest box. Once again, she is successfully defending the territory, for the sixth straight year.

March 3 - A territorial battle was observed on March 3 at about 11 a.m. An unbanded adult female was vying for Orton's attention. Hattie did not tolerate the presence of another female and quickly gave her an escort out of the area. Territorial battles are quite common at this time of year as migrating birds come through the area.

February 23 - Orton is working on a scrape - a depression in the gravel - in the nest box. Peregrines use a scrape as a nest for eggs.

February 22 - As of 2/19/21, Jackie Fallon identified both Hattie and Orton as maintaining possession of the Mayo territory. This time of year, there can be quite a bit of change in occupancy, with the resident birds actively defending the box.


The Providence Peregrine Live Stream

You've watched the 2021 Providence Peregrines hatch and grow. And now they have begun to fledge! We hope you will keep watching as they take flight in the city of Providence, RI, and consider supporting the webcam, a window into the natural world of these incredible birds.

Your contributions are so important. Please consider donating today.

Your donation keeps the camera streaming throughout the nesting season each year.

THANK YOU! Party for the Peregrines was a huge success - and so much fun.

Sign up to receive Providence Peregrine updates and the monthly Audubon eWing newsletter.

Images by Peter Green of Providence Raptors

Updates From the Nest Box

Timestamps are the time of the update, not the time of the event.

The fourth fledgling has taken flight! Viewers watched three fledglings gather again on the rooftop this morning (image sent in by a viewer - thank you!) Although the fledglings may briefly return to this familiar spot, they will do so less and less over the next couple of days as they explore more of their parents' territory. The nestbox (and birds' nests in general) are strictly nurseries.

It's always bittersweet to watch them go! We will be shutting the camera off for the season in the next day or two. Thank you to everyone who tuned in for the 2021 season, sent in their observations and pictures, donated in support of the live stream, and shared this live stream with friends and family! Your support, in all forms, is greatly appreciated.

If you haven't done so already, sign up for Audubon's emails so you won't miss the official 2022 Providence Peregrine nesting season announcement and consider making a donation to bring back the live stream next year!

We will continue to post any updates or sightings here as the juveniles practice their flight skills and learn how to hunt through the month of July. In early August, the parents will encourage their young to move out and find their own territory. Peregrine Falcons are a migratory species and have been recorded to migrate up to about 8,000 miles. Many birds will stay in their urban territory year-round though, due to the abundance of food in these locations (namely pigeons.)

June 17

The fourth fledgling has taken flight! Viewers watched three fledglings gather again on the rooftop this morning (image sent in by a viewer - thank you!) Although the fledglings may briefly return to this familiar spot, they will do so less and less over the next couple of days as they explore more of their parents' territory. The nestbox (and birds' nests in general) are strictly nurseries.

It's always bittersweet to watch them go! We will be shutting the camera off for the season in the next day or two. Thank you to everyone who tuned in for the 2021 season, sent in their observations and pictures, donated in support of the live stream, and shared this live stream with friends and family! Your support, in all forms, is greatly appreciated.

If you haven't done so already, sign up for Audubon's emails so you won't miss the official 2022 Providence Peregrine nesting season announcement and consider making a donation to bring back the live stream next year!

We will continue to post any updates or sightings here as the juveniles practice their flight skills and learn how to hunt through the month of July. In early August, the parents will encourage their young to move out and find their own territory. Peregrine Falcons are a migratory species and have been recorded to migrate up to about 8,000 miles. Many birds will stay in their urban territory year-round though, due to the abundance of food in these locations (namely pigeons.)

Another note on the fourth, "missing" fledgling:

We have not been able to confirm anything at this point because the bird was not ready to fly and therefore, if alive, has simply been out of sight, hanging out on another rooftop (they oftentimes manage to successfully glide at this age.)

So, the next couple of days will be telling in terms of confirming his status - as this is when the fledglings will begin flying around the city.

Peter Green of Providence Raptors, along with other avid viewers/birdwatchers in downtown Providence, are our eyes on the juveniles once they leave the building. If there is not a sighting of the fourth juvenile flying around in the next few days, it's safe to say that he did not make it. It is certainly sad, but this is the reason Peregrine Falcons lay three to four eggs on average, versus just one or two.

We will absolutely post any updates on the website! But, any update confirming his status won't be available for at least a couple of days.

"One Peregrine Falcon fledgling was visible from the street this morning" shared Peter Green, of Providence Raptors. Peter is our "eyes" in downtown Providence, once the fledglings take off. Follow his page, Providence Raptors, on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for more great shots and updates on the Providence Peregrines (and more!)

June 16 2:30 pm

"One Peregrine Falcon fledgling was visible from the street this morning" shared Peter Green, of Providence Raptors. Peter is our "eyes" in downtown Providence, once the fledglings take off. Follow his page, Providence Raptors, on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for more great shots and updates on the Providence Peregrines (and more!)

Lift off! This screen capture was sent in by a viewer named Willy - thank you!

Just one fledgling remains in view of the webcam. Keep watching so you don't miss his first flight! Once the final fledgling takes off, they won't return and we will end the live stream for the 2021 season. Rember to use use the form below these updates to report any sightings, send in screenshots, etc.!

June 16 1:45 pm

Lift off! This screen capture was sent in by a viewer named Willy - thank you!

Just one fledgling remains in view of the webcam. Keep watching so you don't miss his first flight! Once the final fledgling takes off, they won't return and we will end the live stream for the 2021 season. Rember to use use the form below these updates to report any sightings, send in screenshots, etc.!

A fledgling took their first flight today around 3:30 pm!

Even after their young take their first flights, the parents will continue to provide prey and flight lessons for the next couple weeks . Once a bird leaves a nest, they typically will not return as nests are just nurseries, not "homes".

Viewer Question: How do the parent peregrines locate their fledglings once they take flight?
Answer: The juveniles stay in the family's territory while they are still learning, so they are never far. The parents will use the same incredible skills they possess for hunting purposes to keep track of their young - their keen eyesight and hearing.

Want to watch the "flying lessons" that will take place this month? You can visit them yourself: the Providence Place Mall is close by, making it a great place to park (it's free for the first two hours.) Don't forget your binoculars!

The fourth eyas fledged this morning around 6:30 am (thanks to a viewer for the screenshot!)

We still have not had a sighting of the fledgling who fell. We will keep you updated here with any information.

Their first flights will happen at any time. You will notice that the fledglings spend a lot of time flapping their wings - this is both to strengthen their muscles and get acclimated to the breezy air beneath their wings. At this point, the fledglings are fully developed - besides a few remaining down feathers.

The next notable change in appearance will happen when they are a year old and their adult plumage replaces their juvenile plumage through a process called "moulting". From All About Birds: "Adults are blue-gray above with barred underparts and a dark head with thick sideburns. Juveniles are heavily marked, with vertical streaks instead of horizontal bars on the breast. Despite considerable age-related and geographic variation, an overall steely, barred look remains."

June 15 10:30 am

The fourth eyas fledged this morning around 6:30 am (thanks to a viewer for the screenshot!)

We still have not had a sighting of the fledgling who fell. We will keep you updated here with any information.

Their first flights will happen at any time. You will notice that the fledglings spend a lot of time flapping their wings - this is both to strengthen their muscles and get acclimated to the breezy air beneath their wings. At this point, the fledglings are fully developed - besides a few remaining down feathers.

The next notable change in appearance will happen when they are a year old and their adult plumage replaces their juvenile plumage through a process called "moulting". From All About Birds: "Adults are blue-gray above with barred underparts and a dark head with thick sideburns. Juveniles are heavily marked, with vertical streaks instead of horizontal bars on the breast. Despite considerable age-related and geographic variation, an overall steely, barred look remains.

The third eyas has fledged and is currently on the building's roof area! The remaining nestling is looking on at his fledgling brothers with seemingly great interest (calling and lots of eager wing flapping.)

A few viewers have expressed concern over the falcon on the lower ledge. He most likely is not yet confident enough in jumping up and down between the ledges. He'll quickly gain the strength and confidence to so - this is all part of the learning and growing process! As we've stated in previous updates, it is not uncommon for parents to withhold food at this point, as a way to encourage their development.

Our best guess on why he "likes" this lower ledge so much? This spot might provide a sense of safety, rather than being completely out in the open. The small wall that makes up the higher ledge makes for one less direction a predator may approach from. Speaking of predators, Peregrine Falcons do have a few, such as eagles, Great Horned Owls, and other Peregrines!

One of the fledglings lost his footing while on the ledge around 4:30 pm. We have not had any sightings of him on the ground or elsewhere but we are hopeful that he managed to glide to another roof close by, or on a lower ledge of this building. We'll keep you updated if there is a sighting!

This morning, the first and second nestlings left the nestbox! It looks like the first and third hatchlings were the ones to venture off first. At 9:40 am, all four were briefly back in the viewing frame, so it's safe to say that, although these two are now considered "fledglings", they hadn't yet taken their first flights at the time this was written. We zoomed the camera out a bit so the roof is now largely visible for you to see, but many time they hang out behind the nestbox out of view.

Fledging is a very dangerous time. Luckily, because the nestbox is so high up, the falcons to fledge from this spot are able to easily glide from this roof to the many lower roofs of buildings below them. Once they leave the roof, it takes a couple of days to build enough flight coordination and strength to get back to this height.

The parents may stop feeding the nestlings in the next couple of days to encourage them to take their first flights.

VIDEO HIGHLIGHT: A bumblebee visited the Peregrine Falcon nestbox on "fledging day". The curious nestlings watch it buzz around with precision. Watch it here!

June 12, 2021 9:45 am

This morning, the first and second nestlings left the nestbox! It looks like the first and third hatchlings were the ones to venture off first. At 9:40 am, all four were briefly back in the viewing frame, so it's safe to say that, although these two are now considered "fledglings", they hadn't yet taken their first flights at the time this was written. We zoomed the camera out a bit so the roof is now largely visible for you to see, but many time they hang out behind the nestbox out of view.

Fledging is a very dangerous time. Luckily, because the nestbox is so high up, the falcons to fledge from this spot are able to easily glide from this roof to the many lower roofs of buildings below them. Once they leave the roof, it takes a couple of days to build enough flight coordination and strength to get back to this height.

The parents may stop feeding the nestlings in the next couple of days to encourage them to take their first flights.

VIDEO HIGHLIGHT: A bumblebee visited the Peregrine Falcon nestbox on "fledging day". The curious nestlings watch it buzz around with precision. Watch it here!

They grow up so fast! Here's a throwback to banding day just over two weeks ago!

Plus, check out this video of the three oldest birds stepping up onto the ledge of the nestbox.

The first eyas to hatch is now 35 days old. Sometimes, albeit rarely, the nestlings will take their first flight at this age. He (and the others) certainly do seem eager! Typically though, they will wait a few more days as they continue to build up strength. This weekend, they may start exploring the ledge area of the building.

Keep watching we’ll soon have fledglings!

Woah! Easy does it! The #ProvidencePeregrines’ first flight day is fast approaching. By this time next week, we may have a couple of new fledglings in Providence!

In this video you see the oldest eyas testing his wings on the breeze with hardly any down feathers left on his body. He was even seen today stepping onto the bar/edge of the nestbox. They will all begin doing this more throughout the week as they get eager to fly. They will also begin exploring the ledge around the nestbox too. The younger ones still have some tufts of down feathers, especially on their legs (white pants, anyone?!)

The eyases will remain dependent on their parents for good meals even after their first flights, until they can consistently hunt. But, in the coming week, feeding times may get a little more sparse, and then stop altogether, as the parents encourage their young to take flight and begin hunting behavior.

Don't miss flight day: keep tuning in!

June 9, 2021

Woah! Easy does it! The #ProvidencePeregrines’ first flight day is fast approaching. By this time next week, we may have a couple of new fledglings in Providence!

In this video you see the oldest eyas testing his wings on the breeze with hardly any down feathers left on his body. He was even seen today stepping onto the bar/edge of the nestbox. They will all begin doing this more throughout the week as they get eager to fly. They will also begin exploring the ledge around the nestbox too. The younger ones still have some tufts of down feathers, especially on their legs (white pants, anyone?!)

The eyases will remain dependent on their parents for good meals even after their first flights, until they can consistently hunt. But, in the coming week, feeding times may get a little more sparse, and then stop altogether, as the parents encourage their young to take flight and begin hunting behavior.

Don't miss flight day: keep tuning in!

In their fourth week of life, the eyases undergo significant changes almost daily, making the age differences between the first and last to hatch in this brood clearly visible. The secondary (wing) feathers develop brown tips and the number of feathers visible on the breast increases noticeably as well. The area of feathers on their face expands in size each day. Within just a couple days during this period, the eyases will go from regularly resting on their tarsi (lower leg) to being able to stand and walk on their feet exclusively. Soon enough, all four chicks will be regularly opening their wings and running about the nest box!

June 3, 2021

In their fourth week of life, the eyases undergo significant changes almost daily, making the age differences between the first and last to hatch in this brood clearly visible. The secondary (wing) feathers develop brown tips and the number of feathers visible on the breast increases noticeably as well. The area of feathers on their face expands in size each day. Within just a couple days during this period, the eyases will go from regularly resting on their tarsi (lower leg) to being able to stand and walk on their feet exclusively. Soon enough, all four chicks will be regularly opening their wings and running about the nest box!

We have been banding the peregrine falcons in Providence since their re-introduction to Providence in 2000. Peregrine Falcons are a recovering species, nearly extinct in the United States. Peregrine falcons fell prey to the effects of DDT.

Banding data provides critical information on the health of the falcon population. We provide our data to the Bird Banding Laboratory, part of the US Geological Survey.

This morning we banded four male falcons. The parents will continue to care for the birds until they fledge … probably in the next two weeks. As the birds grow, the adults spend more and more time out of the nest hunting, as they need to provide food for four young as well as themselves.

Sometime around 9:45am-10am we will begin the process of banding the young falcons. A board will be placed across the front of the nesting box to protect the falcons. Joe Zbyrowski, our bander, will remove the back opening of the box and remove the falcons. The birds will be measured and the sex determined and then two bands will be placed on one leg of each bird. The bird's legs have stopped growing so the bands will never constrict their legs. The bands will help scientists identify where the birds were hatched, the year, and if they are male or female. The birds will then be placed back in the box, the front board removed and the process will be over. It takes a little over an hour to band four birds.

All is well at the nest. The parents spend much time hunting for their hungry young, plus themselves. Although you don't see a parent in the nest box, rest assured they are only seconds away if any predator approaches. After all, they are the fastest creature on the planet.

The Providence Peregrine webcam is back online! Thank you to our sponsors Streamguys, Stenhouse Consulting, and Cox Communications. When you are streaming from the top of Rhode Island you need a team effort . and everyone delivered! Thank you to all the donors who contributed already this month . we really need your support to keep this camera online.

After a day spent at the Superman building and calls to our internet service provider, we were unable to get a technician out to us due to an unrelated outage in their network. Their next availability is, unfortunately, Monday morning. Until then, you may be able to catch some spotty glimpses of the falcons on the live stream but for the most part, the webcam will be down throughout the weekend. We will post updates here and on social media when we know more or are back online! Thank you for your understanding.

Image is the view of the nestbox from the window of the room we use to access the webcam. All four eyases are doing well and feasted on woodpecker during our visit!

May 14 5:30 pm

It looks like a gosling was "on the menu" today - click here for the video highlight. It was quite a catch! Peregrine Falcons will cache food that they do not finish in one feeding session - especially when there are nestlings to feed. They do so away from their nesting site ("eyrie") in order to not attract predators. Prey is often transferred from male to female near the nestbox, and then the female returns with the catch to feed the young.

You'll notice that the fourth eyas to hatch is now much stronger today!

Did the fourth egg actually hatch?! Yes! What you are seeing in the nestbox is the eggshell from the fourth and youngest eyas' hatch yesterday. Compared to the youngest, the first and second eyases to hatch are three days older and the third eyas is two days older. Developmentally speaking, a couple of days is a long time for the young falcons! The youngest eyas is not only still regaining its strength from hatching out of its egg - but is a bit smaller than the others due to its age. If you look extremely carefully, you will indeed see the fourth eyas - and now that it is over a day old, you may begin to see it more readily!

The fourth egg has hatched this morning! Brooding will continue for about another week. The eyases will fledge (leave the nest) around 38-45 days after hatching timing depends on age, sex and physical condition of each chick.

May 11 8:40 am

One of the four eggs in this year's brood still has yet to hatch. You can see the fourth egg during a feeding session this afternoon in this video, along with the three eyases. The hatching of the fourth egg is still very possible - but the hatch window will close in the coming days.

Happy Mother’s Day to all the hardworking moms - including mama Peregrine! The third eyas hatched this morning. Egg hatching is a strenuous activity that consists mostly of resting time. It is also the first survival test of each bird's life, thus the chicks do not receive any assistance from their parents. Although only three of the four eggs have hatched so far, the parents are already working around the clock to provide enough food for the eyases. They will double in weight in the first week alone!

May 9 8:20 am

The second egg has hatched! Mom can be seen eating the eggshells for the rich source of calcium. For 1-2 weeks after hatching, the chicks are brooded almost constantly, usually by the female while the male hunts for food to feed the family. The female and male will switch places occasionally too! After this period, both adults will leave the nestbox in order to hunt enough food to feed the quickly growing eyases.

May 8 10:25 am

HAPPY HATCH DAY! The first Providence Peregrine began hatching early this morning and was fully emerged from its eggshell by approximately 10 am. Keep tuning in as the other three eggs will hatch throughout the weekend!

Look closely when the adult lifts their body up - can you see "pipping" holes in the remaining eggs? Pipping is what occurs when an egg is ready to hatch and the eyas first uses its beak to punch a small hole in the egg to allow it to breathe air.

May 8 9:30 am

The Providence Peregrine's eggs should be hatching at any time! Mom seems restless - is today hatch day for the Providence Peregrines?

In this video, the female Peregrine Falcon can be seen eating rocks! Peregrines, like all birds, need some grit in their diet to help them digest their meals. She may be ingesting some pebbles from their "scrape" (gravel nest), or she might just be rearranging the gravel while she awaits hatch day!

A fourth egg was laid this afternoon! The Peregrine Falcons will take turns incubating the eggs and hunting for food to support each other - but typically most of the brooding will be done by the female. The incubation period lasts around 30-35 days. To predict a hatch date window, we count 30–35 days from when the second-to-last egg was laid (this is usually when incubation fully begins.)

A third egg was laid in the morning! Can you tell who is incubating at any given time? Female Peregrine Falcons are larger than males. The female does most of the incubating but they do switch off when she needs to feed!

A second egg has been laid. Can you catch a glimpse today? Each egg weighs around 52g and it can take around 48 hours to produce each one!

The Providence Peregrine Falcons are back and there is one egg in the nest as of April 1st!

April 2, 2021

The Providence Peregrine Falcons are back! This popular live stream is brought to you by the Audubon Society of Rhode Island, from atop the "Superman" Building in Downtown Providence.

This year's pair is unbanded for the fourth year in a row - so it is impossible to confirm whether or not it is the same pair from last year. However, the adult Peregrine Falcons that utilize this nestbox usually have enough year-round food in their territory, allowing them to stay here instead of migrating south each winter. This makes it likely that the 2021 pair are the same birds as last year.

The first mating attempt on March 19th was seemingly unsuccessful. A second attempt this week resulted in the first egg, which was laid yesterday, April 1, 2021! Tune in today and into the weekend because more eggs may be on the way!

Thank you for your patience as we put the finishing touches on this year's Providence Peregrine live stream system!

Relive the 2020 nesting season. Video highlights are available!

2020 Updates from the Nest Box

March 17, 2020
A great cure for cabin fever and better than Netflix: the Providence Peregrine Falcons are back!

Over the past week, courtship behavior between the two birds - such as bowing towards each other and flying together - has been seen. Yesterday, they were spotted mating, so eggs are on the way!

The birds look to be the same unbanded pair from last year. As the female gets closer to her egg-laying date, you will see her in the nestbox more frequently. For now, you can see them on camera when they return to stake their territory.

As we find ourselves socially distancing ourselves in order to maintain the health of our community, we hope you'll find joy and wonder once again in watching the Providence Peregrine Falcons live-stream.

Please share widely and if you see something interesting happen on-screen, we'd love to hear about it!

March 20, 2020
The female Peregrine Falcon laid the first egg sometime today, March 20th! While viewing the camera, look for a rust-colored spot. She will lay a total 3-4 eggs over a 2-3 day period. Round-the-clock incubation does not begin until the last or penultimate egg is laid. This allows the the entire clutch to hatch around the same time, roughly 30 days later. Both male and female Providence Peregrines will take turns incubating the eggs. Keep tuning in over the next few days to see her lay the others!

March 22, 2020
There are now two eggs in the nest!

March 24, 2020
Three eggs in the nest as of 6 PM!

March 29, 2020
A fourth egg was laid around 11:30 am!

March 30, 2020
Incubation has fully begun! The Peregrine Falcons will take turns incubating the eggs and hunting for food to support each other. Eggs can be expected to hatch anytime in the last week of April/first week of May!

April 30, 2020
Overnight or sometime in the early morning, the first Peregrine Falcon egg hatched! Stay tuned throughout the day as the others follow.
Watch the highlight: https://youtu.be/OCb5PMpWcaQ

May 1, 2020
The second egg has hatched sometime overnight.
Watch the highlight: https://youtu.be/RLVpSXch1fA

May 2, 2020
A third Peregrine Falcon has hatched.
Watch the highlight: https://youtu.be/azKL_5Z1GJY

May 3, 2020
All four eggs have hatched!
Watch the highlight: https://youtu.be/uG57xKoqdPo

May 18, 2020
What can you expect to see as a viewer on banding day? First, bander Joe Zbyrowski will approach the nestbox from the back on a ladder. He will place a board in the front of the nestbox so the chicks don't run out and over the ledge when retrieving them. He will then open the back door, take the eyases out, and place them in a basket. The eyases will be lowered to the landing about 10 feet below. During the whole process, the parent falcons will be exhibiting territorial behavior. You will see orange brooms waving in the background - these are by no means intended to hit the parents. Rather, they deter the parents from attempting to dive-bomb the humans. Once the eyases have been banded and their sex determined, they will be promptly returned to the nest box.

Watch our Party for the Peregrines+ Night 3 replay to learn more about Peregrine Falcon banding from Master bander Joe Zbyrowski: https://youtu.be/vTX-EIcxUs8 (begins at the 20:10 timestamp).

May 21, 2020
FAQ: Where are the parent Peregrine Falcons?!

At this stage, it is completely normal for the parents of the eyases (chicks) to be absent from the nestbox. They are now spending most of their time hunting to feed their growing family, or resting, and they will only return to feed their young.

The eyases are brooded almost continuously for only around the first 10 days of life. After this point, they are able to regulate their body temperature themselves. Plus, it becomes pretty uncomfortable for the parent(s) to remain in the nest box at all times due to the increasing size of the eyases!

Contrary to what is commonly portrayed in cartoons, nests strictly provide a place for laying eggs and raising young until they fledge during breeding season. Fledglings, juveniles and adult birds do no sleep in nests and many birds do not necessarily have a particular spot they return to each time they need to rest, and the Peregrines are no different. They will perch and rest anywhere they please within their territory.

Keep watching and hopefully you will be tuned-in at just the right time to see the adults return to feed their young!

May 22, 2020
BANDING DAY - Watch the recap on YouTube: https://youtu.be/tZA1WHBMcGc!

Today, we successfully banded and determined the sex of the four eyases: two females and two males! When the chicks are around three weeks old, their legs have stopped growing. This is the perfect time to band the birds because it ensures they will not grow out of their bands, and they are still very docile and easy to handle. Leg size is also the determining factor of the sex of the bird. Females are substantially larger than males - the bigger the leg, the bigger the bird.

Lisa Gould and Loree Kallienen were able to experience the falcon banding this year after winning the experience through the Party for the Peregrines+ online fundraiser Golden Ticket Raffle last week. Thank you to everyone who bought a raffle ticket and participated in the online auction, Joe Zbyrowski for banding this year's brood and Peter Green of Providence Raptors for taking photos and video!

Watch our Party for the Peregrines+ Night 3 replay to learn more about Peregrine Falcon banding from Master bander Joe Zbyrowski: https://youtu.be/vTX-EIcxUs8 (begins at the 20:10 timestamp).

How many and what kinds of leg bands do peregrines get and what do the codes mean?
Peregrine falcons banded in North America typically receive 2 leg bands-one on each leg. The first band is a U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) band which contains a number unique to that individual falcon (similar to a Social Security number). The numbers are small and hard to read unless you have the bird in hand. A second band is placed on the leg opposite of the USFWS band. This band is usually one or two colors and may have a few numbers and/or letters. This is done to increase the number of possible combinations of letters and numbers on these special color bands. These are made to be read from a distance, usually using a camera or spotting scope.

Bird banding allows scientists to track the life history, migration and reproductive behavior of bird individuals and overall populations. The data that bird banding provides is increasing valuable as we aim to better understand the climate and biodiversity crises.

Do the leg bands hurt the falcons or affect the way they hunt?
The bands placed on peregrine falcons are a very lightweight aluminum material and are specially sized to fit a falcon's leg. They do not hurt the bird in any way and are comparable to a human wearing a bracelet. The leg bands do not interfere with flight or grasping of prey.

May 27, 2020
At almost a month old, these chicks are right where they need to be developmentally. Their body contours and back feathers are beginning to take shape. Although they still rest on their tarsi (lower leg) quite often, they have begun walking on their feet!

June 8, 2020
The first Providence Peregrine Falcon fledgling left the nest box at 5:37 AM and has begun exploring the ledge and roof of the surrounding area! A fledgling is a bird with wing feathers developed enough for flight. The other fledglings, one by one, will follow closely behind. They'll begin taking flight within a couple days of leaving the nest box, after they have a chance to really stretch and strengthen their wing muscles.

WATCH: The first fledgling explores the area outside the nest box: https://youtu.be/GAq-ZezGQbY

What happens next? Once the fledglings take their first flights, you may be able to spot them on the live webcam stream for a couple weeks they don't venture too far, and they may still associate the nest box area with food. The fledglings will be dependent on their parents for food for another 4-6 weeks. During this time, they will first get more comfortable flying and then they will attempt to hunt, mostly unsuccessfully at first.

June 8, 2020
At 8:45 pm, within 24 hours of leaving the nest box, the first Providence Peregrine Falcon fledgling took his first flight! While the actual flight itself wasn't captured on video due to the camera angle, viewers are able to see the falcon hop onto a lower ledge and then ultimately leave the building.

The first flights are never graceful, and are sometimes unsuccessful. Luckily, he was spotted on a nearby building the next morning by Peter Green of Providence Raptors. Here is a link to the photos confirming the fledgling's successful first flight.

June 10, 2020
The second Providence Peregrine Falcon fledgling left the nest box at 6:22 AM and has begun exploring the ledge and roof of the surrounding area!

June 10, 2020
The third Providence Peregrine Falcon fledgling left the nest box at 4:13 PM and has begun exploring the ledge and roof of the surrounding area!

June 11, 2020
The fourth and final Providence Peregrine Falcon fledgling has left the nest box at 7:09 AM and has begun exploring the ledge and roof of the surrounding area!

June 11, 2020
Two out of four fledglings have taken their "first flights": the second Peregrine Falcon fledgling glided off of 111 Westminster and safely landed on a rooftop by the Arcade.

June 14, 2020
The final two Falcons took flight sometime over the weekend. Good luck to the newest Providence Peregrine Falcons as they learn to fly and hunt! Thank you to all who watch the 2020 Providence Peregrine nesting season unfold. Each year is exciting, but with social distancing practices in place due to Covid-19, the glimpse into these birds' lives was just that much more special.


A Prayer to St. Peregrine for Sick Relatives and Friends

O great St. Peregrine, you have been called "The Mighty", the "The Wonder Worker" because of the numerous miracles which you obtained from God for those who have turned to you in their need.
For so many years you bore in your own flesh this cancerous disease that destroys the very fiber of our being.
You turned to God when the power of human beings could do no more,
and you were favored with the vision of Jesus coming down from His cross
to heal your affliction.
I now ask God to heal these sick persons whom I entrust to you:
( Here mention their names )
Aided by your powerful intercession, I shall sing with Mary a hymn of gratitude
to God for His great goodness and mercy. Amen.

For more information on devotion to St. Peregrine, to obtain a prayer-card of St. Peregrine, or to request a copy of the St. Peregrine Newsletter please write:

Shrine Director
National Shrine of St. Peregrine
3121 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago, IL 60612-2729
The Grotto
P.O. Box 20008
Portland, OR 97294-0008

Each week Mass is said for the many intentions received at the National Shrine of St. Peregrine. You can have you petitions remembered in this Mass by writing the Shrine Director in Chicago or by sending an e-mail to National Shrine of St. Peregrine.


Peregrine falcon

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Peregrine falcon, (Falco peregrinus), also called duck hawk, the most widely distributed species of bird of prey, with breeding populations on every continent except Antarctica and many oceanic islands. Sixteen subspecies are recognized. The peregrine falcon is best known for its diving speed during flight—which can reach more than 300 km (186 miles) per hour—making it not only the world’s fastest bird but also the world’s fastest animal.

Coloration is a bluish gray above, with black bars on the white to yellowish white underparts. Adult peregrines range from about 36 to 49 cm (14.2 to 19.3 inches) in length. Strong and fast, they hunt by flying high and then diving at their prey. Attaining tremendous speeds of more than 320 km (200 miles) per hour, they strike with clenched talons and kill by impact. Their prey includes ducks and a wide variety of songbirds and shorebirds. Peregrines inhabit rocky open country near water where birds are plentiful. The usual nest is a mere scrape on a ledge high on a cliff, but a few populations use city skyscrapers or tree nests built by other bird species. The clutch is three or four reddish brown eggs, and incubation lasts about a month. The young fledge in five to six weeks.

Captive peregrine falcons have long been used in the sport of falconry. After World War II the peregrine falcon suffered a precipitous population decline throughout most of its global range. In most regions, including North America, the chief cause of the decline was traced to the pesticide DDT, which the birds had obtained from their avian prey. The chemical had become concentrated in the peregrine’s tissues and interfered with the deposition of calcium in the eggshells, causing them to be abnormally thin and prone to breakage. In the British Isles, direct mortality from another pesticide, dieldrin, was the most important cause of the decline. Following the banning or great reduction in the use of most organochlorine pesticides, populations have rebounded in virtually every part of the world and now exceed historical levels in many regions.

The American peregrine falcon (F. peregrinus anatum), which once bred from Hudson Bay to the southern United States, was formerly an endangered species. It had completely vanished from the eastern United States and eastern boreal Canada by the late 1960s. After Canada had banned DDT use by 1969 and the United States by 1972, vigorous captive breeding and reintroduction programs were initiated in both countries. Over the next 30 years, more than 6,000 captive progeny were released to the wild. North American populations recovered completely, and since 1999 the peregrine has not been listed as endangered. The peregrine has been listed as a species of least concern by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) since 2015.


Vietnam operations

Exactly 3 months later Jamestown got underway for the Far East and reached Subic Bay in the Philippines 29 December. She operated in the South China Sea gathering valuable information for the Navy's ships fighting to protect the independence of South Vietnam while adding to the long Navy tradition of serving the field of scientific research. She continued operating in the Far East, often operating in the Vietnam war zone, through mid-1969.

Jamestown was decommissioned 19 December 1969 and scrapped in May 1970.


21st March 1831. Vitriolic.

When this is dissolved in water (H2O) it converts to Sulfuric Acid (H2SO4).

Sulfur Trioxide in gaseous form is a pollutant and primary agent in acid raid.

Sulfuric acid was a means of revenge in Victorian times used in 1883 by the 40 years Mary Morrison against her husband for which she got five years.

It was also the preferred acid of Haigh in the 1949 gruesome Brides in the Bath murders.

In literature it was used in a Sherlock Holmes case, The Case of the Illustrious Client, where an ex paramour takes revenge on the dastardly Baron Adelbert Gruner.

The highly reactive Sodium (Na) is a soft, silvery metal which when reacting with Sulfuric Acid produces the soluble salt, sodium sulfate, used today in detergents, wood pulp, textiles and glass.(3)

However this salt is bad for buildings as it crystallises with implications for decay of porous masonry, cement and mortar.

Salt weathering is thus a problem for the construction industry where soluble salts of both sodium and calcium (sulfates), are released from Portland Cement.

Sodium Sulfate crystals, in a porous material, may precipitate as the mineral Thenardite or as Mirabilite (in humid conditions) and is found in old mine workings and caves.

(1) Alternative spellings sulphuric, sulphate etc.

(2) When an element is oxidised it loses electrons so now has more protons, thus it rises a cation (positive) level.

(3) Salts depend on the metal and acid used so Zinc and Sulfuric Acid produce the salt Zinc Sulfide.

Sodium sulfite when exposed to air is oxidised to sodium sulfate.

The oxidation state of sulfide is II for sulfite IV and for sulfate VI means it they have to lose those numbers in electrons to be oxidised.

The hydrate (containing water) of Sodium Sulfate (Glauber’s Salts) is also known as Sal Mirabilis, once used as a laxative.

Ref: The Repository of Patent Inventory: And other Discoveries and Improvements.


Peregrine AM-373 - History

On 25 February 2019, Pittsburgh returned to its homeport at Naval Submarine Base New London after completion of its final deployment. The submarine arrived at Bremerton, Washington on 28 May 2019, for months-long inactivation and decommissioning process.

During a period of rising tensions with Japan over the Second Sino-Japanese War in 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered the Battle Force to relocate from its homeport in San Pedro, California to Pearl Harbor in Hawaii in an effort to deter further aggression. Modernization work for the ships that was scheduled for 1940 and 1941 was cancelled, as was the fleet problem for 1941, as the situation with Japan was approaching a crisis and the Navy determined that the fleet needed to be maintained at a high state of readiness. Nevertheless, when the Japanese attacked the fleet at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, they did so having achieved complete surprise. Totally unprepared for the surprise attack, both ships were anchored in Battleship Row, where California was sunk in shallow water. Tennessee, moored inboard of the battleship and thus protected from torpedo attacks, emerged relatively undamaged, though fires from other ships had warped some of her hull plates and necessitated repairs. She was also trapped when West Virginia sank and came to rest up against Tennessee, forcing her up against the concrete quay.

During the Cuban missile crisis in late 1962, VF-32 flew 96 sorties to support photo-reconnaissance flights and intelligence-gathering missions. After returning from cruise in 1965, the squadron changed homeport from NAS Cecil Field, Florida to NAS Oceana, Virginia, and switched to the F-4B Phantom II. VF-32 detached from Carrier Air Group THREE, ending a relationship that had lasted since the squadron's establishment.

Just before Christmas, the yard delivered Lawrence, which was commissioned on 6 January of the new year, with CDR Thomas W. Walsh in command. She joined the Atlantic Fleet and the navy's first all-missile destroyer squadron commanded by one of Mustin's heroes, CAPT Ike Kidd. Her homeport was Norfolk, Virginia, and in the Spring of 1962, Lucy and the children moved to Virginia Beach and the first house the Mustins would own.

The submarines' homeport is Simon's Town naval base near Cape Town.

The ship was rushed into service and developed problems with the steering gear, possibly because the ship was incomplete when it was put into service. She was under the command of Capt Mjr. Robert Kasperski and her homeport was at Jastarnia.

Peacock was the last of the Sasebo-based MSC's to depart Japan. She headed for Long Beach, California just after Christmas, 1970, for further assignment as a Reserve training ship. Peacock sailed "unaccompanied" from Sasebo to Taiwan where she laid over for New Years 1971. She then sailed to Subic Bay, PI where she hooked up with four MSO class minesweepers for the transit east. Off Johnston Island Peacock detached from the other ships and headed to Pearl Harbor on her own. Following a short stay in Pearl Harbor she departed for the last leg of the transit to her new homeport of Long Beach, CA. The total transit took 57 days.

Peregrine spent most of the years from 1951 to 1955 operating out of Norfolk with cruises as far south as Balboa, Panama Canal Zone and as far north as Naval Station Argentia, Newfoundland. On 7 February 1955 she became MSF-373. On 9 September 1955 she departed Key West, Florida, for Port Lyautey, North Africa. She operated off Casablanca and called at Gibraltar before sailing for Bermuda and Key West, Florida, arriving at that homeport 8 December. From 1955 to 1960 Peregrine operated out of Key West, Florida, as far south as Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and Ciudad Trujillo, Dominican Republic, and as far north as New York City. On 24 June Peregrine departed for special operations near Saint John's harbor, New Brunswick, Canada.

In 1984 Portsmouth entered her homeport of Groton, Connecticut, which she left for her permanent homeport at Ballast Point Submarine Base in San Diego. En route she transited through the Panama Canal and made a quick dash south for her first transit across the equator.

United States Pacific Fleet vessels spent a combined total of 700 days in the South China Sea during 2015 alone. This includes vessels assigned to Carrier Strike Group 5, which included the until the summer of 2015, at which point the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) took its place in the homeport of Yokosuka, Japan after a hull swap in San Diego, CA.

Tobruk conducted her first trips outside Australia in the early 1980s. On 15 February 1982, the ship left Brisbane to transport eight UH-1 Iroquois helicopters from the Royal Australian Air Force, plus supporting stores, to join the Australian contingent to the Multinational Force and Observers in the Sinai Peninsula. Tobruk arrived in Ashdod, Israel on 19 March, becoming the first Australian warship to visit the country, and arrived back in Brisbane on 30 April. The ship transported cyclone relief stores to Tonga in May and spent the remainder of the year undertaking tasks in Australian waters. These included supporting the 1982 Commonwealth Games, which were held in Brisbane. In early 1983, Tobruk travelled to Malaysia to assist the RAAF in withdrawing units from RAAF Base Butterworth. In February 1984, Tobruk took part in exercises in New Zealand, before travelling to Tuvalu in August, where she provided support and accommodation for delegates to the South Pacific Forum. In late 1985, the naval base was decommissioned, prompting the disbanding of the Amphibious Squadron (which had consisted of Tobruk and the six Balikpapan-class landing craft) and the relocation of Tobruk homeport to Fleet Base East in Sydney.

Charlottetown was laid down at Kingston Shipbuilding Ltd., Kingston on 7 June 1941 and launched on 10 September of that year. She was commissioned into the RCN at Quebec City on 13 December and arrived at her homeport of Halifax, Nova Scotia on 18 December 1941.

Thor Heyerdahl (named after Thor Heyerdahl), originally named Tinka, later Marga Henning, Silke, and Minnow, was built as a freight carrying motor ship with auxiliary sails at the shipyard Smit & Zoon in Westerbroek, Netherlands, in 1930. Her original homeport being Hamburg, Germany, she was used for the next 50 years as a freighter. Eventually sailing unter the flag of Panama as Minnow and then awaiting further use in Germany, she was bought in 1979 by two sailing enthusiasts, who turned the now run-down ship into a topsail schooner to use it for sail training, especially for teenagers and young adults. One of the two original owners was Detlef Soitzek, who had sailed with the Norwegian anthropologist, zoologist, ethnologist and adventurer Thor Heyerdahl on his Tigris expedition in 1977/1978, and suggested to name the ship after the famous researcher and adventurer. The ownership of the ship was subsequently turned over to an association.

In all, Liverpool Packet had taken 50 prizes in her brief but successful career. Her captures helped launch the great fortune of Enos Collins. Two steamships from her old homeport of Liverpool, Nova Scotia, were named in her honour in the 20th century.

Ellen Southard plied international trade routes from her homeport in Bath, Maine, with visits documented in ports as far away as Sydney, Australia. In 1864, she recorded the longest duration voyage of any ship transporting railway locomotives from the east to the west coast of the United States. The ship took 205 days to complete the passage after she was delayed for 48 days by unfavourable winds off Cape Horn.

In January 2005, she was chartered to P&O Ferries and entered service on the Zeebrugge – Hull and Rotterdam – Hull routes. On 11 July 2005, Lehola was sold to Elmira Shipping, Piraeus, Greece. She was renamed RR Triumph and reflagged to Malta, her homeport changing from Tallinn to Valletta.

On September 9, 2009, USS Sentry was the last of the Minesweepers from NS Ingleside to arrive in their new homeport of Naval Base San Diego leaving no ships homeported at the base.

Argo was built by John H. Mathis Company in Camden, New Jersey in 1932 and entered service on 6 January 1933 under the command of Lieutenant H. C. Moore, USCG. Her initial homeport was Stapleton, New York until 13 March 1934 when she was transferred to Newport, Rhode Island. She remained in Newport until early 1942. During this time she served on United States Coast Guard Academy cadet training cruises in the Atlantic.

Dallas was at first home ported at the former Coast Guard base on Governors Island, New York. She was relocated to her final homeport of Charleston, South Carolina in September 1996. She was decommissioned on 30 March 2012, and was transferred to the Philippines on May 22, 2012 as an excess defense article through the Foreign Assistance Act.

Smilaxs mission, since her commissioning, has been to service aids to navigation, ensuring the safe navigation of mariners. From her current homeport she is responsible for maintaining 1,226 fixed aids to navigation such as lights and range markers. She is also responsible for 26 buoys throughout the Outer Banks of North Carolina.


یواس‌اس پرگرین (ای‌ام-۳۷۳)

یواس‌اس پرگرین (ای‌ام-۳۷۳) (به انگلیسی: USS Peregrine (AM-373) ) یک کشتی است که طول آن ۲۲۱ فوت ۳ اینچ (۶۷٫۴۴ متر) می‌باشد. این کشتی در سال ۱۹۴۵ ساخته شد.

یواس‌اس پرگرین (ای‌ام-۳۷۳)
پیشینه
مالک
آب‌اندازی: ۲۴ اکتبر ۱۹۴۴
آغاز کار: ۱۷ فوریه ۱۹۴۵
اعزام: ۲۷ سپتامبر ۱۹۴۵
مشخصات اصلی
وزن: ۸۹۰ long ton (۹۰۴ تن)
درازا: ۲۲۱ فوت ۳ اینچ (۶۷٫۴۴ متر)
پهنا: ۳۲ فوت (۹٫۸ متر)
آبخور: ۱۰ فوت ۹ اینچ (۳٫۲۸ متر)
سرعت: ۱۸ گره (۳۳ کیلومتر بر ساعت؛ ۲۱ مایل بر ساعت)

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