Information

No. 185 Squadron (RAF): Second World War


No. 185 Squadron (RAF) during the Second World War

Aircraft - Locations - Group and Duty - Books

No.185 Squadron went through three very different incarnations during the Second World War. From March 1938 to April 1940 it was a training squadron in Bomber Command, before becoming part of No.14 OTU. During this period it was one of the few squadrons to operate the Handley Page Hereford, an unsuccessful version of the Hampden, powered by Napier Dagger engines. The second incarnation lasted lasted from April-May 1940 and never entered service.

The squadron formed for a third time on 27 April 1941 on Malta, from "C" Flight of No.251 Squadron. The new unit operated the Hawker Hurricane for nearly a year, before the first Spitfires arrived early in 1942. The squadron took part in the fierce air battles that raged over Malta, suffering increasingly heavy loses late in 1942 when the Bf 109F arrived on Sicily, outclassing the Hurricane.

The arrival of the Spitfires restored the balance, and by the end of 1942 No.185 Squadron had gone onto the offensive, flying sweeps over Sicily, and then in July 1943 helping to support the Allied invasion of Sicily.

In February 1944 the first part of the squadron moved to Italy, operating from Grottaglie (in the Taranto area), and in August 1944 the entire squadron came back together at Perugia. For the rest of the war it operated as a fighter-bomber unit, supporting the Allied advance up the length of Italy.

Aircraft
June 1939-April 1940: Handley Page Hampden I
August 1939-April 1940: Handley Page Hereford I

April 1941-March 1942: Hawker Hurricane I, IIA and IIB
February 1942-September 1944: Supermarine Spitfire VB, VC
December 1943-August 1945: Supermarine Spitfire VIII and IX (details unclear)

Location
25 August 1939-17 May 1940: Cottesmore
27 April 1941-5 June 1943: Takali and Hal Far (Malta)
5 June-23 September 1943: Qrendi
23 September 1943-3 August 1944: Hal Far
21 February-2 August 1944: Detachment to Grottaglie (Italy)
3-23 August 1944: Perugia
23 August-4 September 1944: Loreto
4-17 September 1944: Fano
17 September-7 October 1944: Borghetto
7 October-17 November 1944: Fano
17 November 1944-1 January 1945: Peretola
1 January-30 April 1945: Pontedera
30 April-16 May 1945: Villafranca
16 May-19 August 1945: Campoformido

Squadron Codes: GL, T

Duty
26 September 1939: Reserve bomber squadron with No. 5 Group

Books

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Introduction

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Allied 15th Army Group Edit

U.S. Seventh Army Edit

U.S. II Corps Edit

The U.S. II Corps was commanded by Lieutenant General Omar Bradley.

U.S. Provisional Corps Edit

(Headquarters activated on 15 July 1943) [2] Commanded by Major General Geoffrey Keyes.

  • U.S. 2nd Armored Division
    Commanded by Major General Hugh Joseph Gaffey. Divisional units were placed under the combat commands as needed.
    • Combat Command A
    • Combat Command B

    British Eighth Army Edit

    The British Eighth Army was under the command of General Sir Bernard Montgomery. The British 46th Infantry Division formed a floating reserve, but it did not participate in the Sicily campaign.

    British XIII Corps Edit
    • 105th Anti-Tank Regiment, Royal Artillery
      • 24th Field Regiment, Royal Artillery
      • 111th Field Regiment, Royal Artillery
      • 66th Medium Regiment, Royal Artillery
        • 56th Field Company, Royal Engineers
          • 2nd Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)
          • 2nd Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
          • 2nd Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment
          • 1st Battalion, Green Howards
          • 1st Battalion, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry
          • 1st Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment
          • 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers
          • 2nd Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment
          • 6th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders
          • 38th Field Company, Royal Engineers
          • 245th Field Company, Royal Engineers
          • 252nd Field Company, Royal Engineers
          • 245th Field Park Company, Royal Engineers
          • 6th Battalion, Green Howards
          • 7th Battalion, Green Howards
            , Durham Light Infantry
      • 8th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry
      • 9th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry
        • 1st Battalion, London Irish Rifles
        • 1st Battalion, London Scottish
        • 10th Battalion, Royal Berkshire Regiment
          • 2nd Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers
          • 1st Battalion, East Surrey Regiment , Northamptonshire Regiment
          • 5th Battalion, Buffs (Royal East Kent Regiment)
          • 6th Battalion, Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment
          • 8th Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
          • 6th Battalion, Royal Iniskilling Fusiliers
          • 1st Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers
          • 2nd Battalion, London Irish Rifles
            [8]
            • 1st Battalion, Border Regiment
            • 2nd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment
            • 9th Field Company, Royal Engineers
            British XXX Corps Edit

            The XXX Corps was commanded by Lieutenant-General Sir Oliver Leese.

            • 73rd Anti-Tank Regiment, Royal Artillery
            • 7th Medium Regiment, Royal Artillery
            • 70th Medium Regiment, Royal Artillery
            • 1st Battalion, The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment
            • 1st Battalion, 48th Highlanders of Canada
              • 5th Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders
              • 2nd Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders
              • 5th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders
              • 5th Battalion, Black Watch
              • 1st Battalion, Gordon Highlanders
              • 5/7th Battalion, Gordon Highlanders
              • 1st Battalion, Black Watch
              • 7th Battalion, Black Watch
              • 7th Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
              • 2nd Battalion, Devonshire Regiment
              • 1st Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment
              • 1st Battalion, Hampshire Regiment
              • 165th Field Regiment, Royal Artillery
              • 300th Anti-Tank Battery, Royal Artillery
              • 352nd Light Anti-Aircraft Battery, Royal Artillery
              • 295th Field Company, Royal Engineers
              • 200th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps

              Allied Mediterranean Naval Command Edit

              The Naval forces were under the command of Admiral of the Fleet Sir. A Cunningham and was divided into several Task Forces. [1]

              Covering Force Edit

              The role of the covering force was to prevent the Italian Navy from attacking the invasion forces.

              Eastern Naval Task Force Edit

              Eastern Naval task Force transported the Eastern Task Force (8th British Army) and provided Naval gunfire support. [1]

              Western Naval Task Force Edit

              The Western Naval Task Force transported the Western Task Force (7th U.S. Army) and provided Naval gunfire support. [1] [15]


                Command by Admiral Henry Kent Hewitt.
                • 80.2 Escort Group
                    7
                      , Destroyers Flag
                • DesDiv 13
                  • , Flag
    • DesDiv 16
      • Dime Force, Task Force 81, commanded by Rear Admiral John L. Hall Jr., USN
        The Dime Task Force landed the U. S. Army First Division (reinforced) and attached units near Gela, Sicily.
      • Cent Force, Task Force 85, commanded by Rear Admiral Alan G. Kirk, USN
        The Cent Task Force landed the U. S. Army Forty-fifth Division (reinforced) and attached units near Scoglitti, Sicily.
      • Task Force Organization
        • 86.1 Cover and Support Group, Rear Admiral Laurance T. DuBose, USN
          • Cruiser Division 13
          • Destroyer Squadron 13
          • Nine LCG(L) British
          • Eight LCF(L) British
            Groups Two Groups Three Group Six Division Seven (less LSTs 4 and 38) Flotilla Two Flotilla Four Group Thirty one
            Less LCTs 80, 207, 208, 214
            Plus LCTs 276, 305 311, 332 12 British LCTs
        • HMS Princess Astrid
        • HMS Prince Leopoid
          • (reinforces) and attached units
      • Allied Air Forces Edit

        At the time of Operation Husky, the Allied air forces in the North African and Mediterranean Theatres were organized as the Mediterranean Air Command (MAC) under the command of Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur Tedder of the Royal Air Force. The major subdivisions of the MAC included the Northwest African Air Forces (NAAF) under the command of Lt. General Carl Spaatz of the U.S. Army Air Forces, the American 12th Air Force (also commanded by Gen. Spaatz), the American 9th Air Force under the command of Lt. General Lewis H. Brereton, and units of the British Royal Air Force (RAF).

        Also supporting the NAAF were the RAF Middle East Command, Air Headquarters Malta, RAF Gibraltar, and the No. 216 (Transfer and Ferry) Group, which were subdivisions of MAC under the command of Tedder. He reported to the Supreme Allied Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower for the NAAF operations, but to the British Chiefs of Staff for RAF Command operations. Air Headquarters Malta, under the command of Air Vice-Marshal Sir Keith Park, also supported Operation Husky.

        The "Desert Air Task Force" consisting of American B-25 Mitchell medium bombers (the 12th and 340th Bombardment Groups) and P-40 Warhawk fighter planes (the 57th, 79th, and 324th Fighter Groups) from the 9th Air Force served under the command of Air Marshal Sir Arthur Coningham of the Northwest African Tactical Air Force. These bomber and fighter groups moved to new airfields on Sicily as soon as a significant beachhead had been captured there.

        In the MAC organization established at the Casablanca Conference in January 1943, the 9th Air Force was assigned as a subdivision of the RAF Middle East Command under the command of Air Chief Marshal Sir Sholto Douglas. [17] [18] [19] [20]

        Mediterranean Air Command (Allied) Edit

        Northwest African Air Forces Edit

        Lt. General Carl Spaatz had his headquarters for the Northwest African Air Forces in Maison-Carrée, Algeria [21]

        Northwest African Strategic Air Force Edit
        Northwest African Coastal Air Force Edit

        Air Vice-Marshal Sir Hugh Lloyd also had his headquarters in Algiers. [21]

          [22] (Air Commodore Kenneth Cross)
          • No. 323 Wing RAF
              , Spitfirefighter planes , Beaufighters
          • No. II/5 Escadre (French Air Force), P-40 Warhawk fighters
          • No. II/7 Escadre (French Air Force), Spitfires , Walrus Air-Sea Rescue planes , Walrus Air-Sea Rescue planes
            • , B-26 Maraudermedium bombers , Beauforts , Beauforts , Beaufighters , Baltimore light bombers (Det.), Vickers Wellingtonmedium bombers (RAAF), Wellington bombers
    • , Blenheim bombers , Blenheims , Wellington medium bombers , Hurricanefighter planes , Hurricanes , Hurricanes , Hudson light bombers , Hudsons , Halifax and Ventura bombers
      , Spitfires , Spitfires , Spitfires
      , Bristol Beaufighters , Beaufighters
      (detached), Swordfish torpedo planes , Albacore c , Albacore n , Albacore r , Albacore r
    1. The 1st and 2nd Antisubmarine Squadrons were assigned to NACAF for administration and placed under the operational control of the U.S. NavyFleet Air Wing 15 of the Moroccan Sea Frontier commanded by Rear Admiral (United States)Frank J. Lowry
    2. Air Ministry was asked to provide two additional Wellington patrol squadrons. [clarification needed] Asked? This is supposed to be an accurate historical document. Many things get asked for, but many less get provided.
    Northwest African Tactical Air Force Edit
        , South African Air Force
          , Spitfire fighters , Spitfires , P-40 Kittyhawk fighters
          , P-40 Warhawks , P-40 Warhawks , P-40 Warhawks
          , P-40 Warhawks , P-40 Warhawks , P-40 Warhawks
          , Detached, Spitfires , Mosquito fighter-bombers , P-51A Mustang fighters
          (USAAF)
          Lt. Colonel John Stevenson
            , A-36 Mustang ground attack aircraft , A-36 Mustangs , A-36 Mustangs
            , A-36 Mustangs , A-36 Mustangs , A-36 Mustangs
            , P-40 Warhawks , P-40 Warhawks , P-40 Warhawks , P-40, Detached
            , P-40 Warhawks , P-40 Warhawks , P-40 Warhawks
            , Spitfires , Spitfires , Spitfires
                , Boston light bombers , Baltimore light bombers , Bostons
                , Baltimores , Baltimores
                , P-40 Warhawks , P-40 Warhawks , P-40 Warhawks , P-40, Detached
                , Bostons , Bostons
                , A-20 Havoc , A-20 Havocs , A-20 Havocs , A-20 Havocs
                , Spitfires , Spitfires , Spitfires
                , B-25 Mitchellmedium bombers , B-25 Mitchells , B-25 Mitchells , B-25 Mitchells
                , B-25 Mitchells , B-25 Mitchells , B-25 Mitchells , B-25 Mitchells

              For Operation Husky, No. 242 Group, originally a component of NATAF in February 1943, was assigned to the Northwest African Coastal Air Force (NACAF). At the same time, Air Headquarters, Western Desert became known as the Desert Air Force. All of the fighter units of Desert Air Force formed No. 211 (Offensive Fighter) Group commanded by Air Commodore Richard Atcherley on April 11, 1943 in Tripoli. The 99th Fighter Squadron was assigned to the XII Air Support Command on May 28, 1943, and later made a part of the 33rd Fighter Group.

              Northwest African Troop Carrier Command Edit

              1) Participation of the Ninth and
              Twelfth Air Forces in the Sicilian Campaign,
              Army Air Forces Historical Study No. 37
              Army Air Forces Historical Office Headquarters,
              Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, 1945.

              2) Maurer, Maurer, Air Force
              Combat Units Of World War II,
              Office of Air Force History,
              Maxwell AFB, Alabama, 1983.

              To help carry out transport and supply operations for Operation Husky, in mid-1943 the American 315th Troop Carrier Group (34th & 43rd Squadrons) had been flown from England to Tunisia. There it was assigned to the Mediterranean Air Transport Service, and along with NATCC, this was a subdivision of the Mediterranean Air Command.

              Northwest African Photographic Reconnaissance Wing Edit
                  , Lt. Colonel Frank Dunn
                    , P-38 Lightnings , P-38 Lightnings
                  • 12th Weather Detachment , B-17 Flying Fortresses photo intelligence squadron
                  Northwest African Air Service Command Edit

                  Brig. General Delmar had his headquarters in Dunton, Algiers. [21]

                  Northwest African Training Command Edit
                  Air Headquarters Malta Edit

                  Air Vice-Marshal Keith Park, the commander of Air Headquarters Malta, had his headquarters in Valletta, Malta [27]

                      , Baltimores , Beaufighters , Wellington bombers , Beaufighters , Spitfires
                      of the South African Air Force
                      , counter-night-intruder operations with Mosquitofighter planes Detachment (Det.), with Hurricane fighter planes Det., with Mosquito night fighters , Beaufighter night fighters Det. (Fleet Air Arm), Fairey Albacores
                    No. 216 (Transport and Ferry) Group Edit
                    RAF Gibraltar Edit

                    Air Vice Marshal Sturley Simpson had his headquarters in Gibraltar

                    Middle East Command Edit

                    Air Marshal Sir Sholto Douglas Headquarters at Cairo, Egypt [21]

                    No. 201 (Naval Co-operation) Group Edit

                    Air Vice Marshal Thomas Langsford-Sainsbury, Headquarters at Alexandria, Egypt

                        (Royal Hellenic Air Force), Blenheim bombers Det., Beaufighters , Baltimores , Hudsons , Swordfish
                        , Beauforts Beaufighters , Beaufighters , Swordfish
                        , Blenheims and Baltimores , Wellingtons
                      • No. 1 General Reconnaissance Unit, Wellingtons
                        , Wellingtons , Baltimores , Beaufighters , Beaufighters

                      No Wing assignment: 701 Naval Air Squadron (FAA), Walrus Air-Sea Rescue

                      Note: RAF=Royal Air Force RAAF=Royal Australian Air Force SAAF=South African Air Force FAA=Fleet Air Arm (Royal Navy) Det.= "detachment"

                      Air Headquarters Air Defences Eastern Mediterranean Edit

                      Air Vice Marshal Richard Saul

                      No. 209 (Fighter) Group
                      Group Captain R.C.F. Lister
                      No. 210 (Fighter) Group
                      Group Captain John Grandy
                      No. 212 (Fighter) Group
                      Air Commodore Archibald Wann
                      No. 219 (Fighter) Group
                      Group Captain Max Aitken
                      No. 46 Squadron RAF Det., Beaufighters No. 3 Squadron SAAF, Hurricanes No. 7 Squadron SAAF, Hurricanes No. 46 Squadron RAF, Beaufighters
                      No. 127 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes and Spitfires No. 33 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes No. 41 Squadron SAAF, Hurricanes No. 74 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes
                      No. 89 Squadron RAF, Beaufighters No. 80 Squadron RAF, Spitfires No. 238 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes
                      No. 213 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes No. 94 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes No. 335 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes
                      No. 274 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes No. 108 Squadron RAF Det., Beaufighters No. 336 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes
                      No. 123 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes No. 451 Squadron RAAF, Hurricanes
                      No. 134 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes
                      No. 237 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes
                      No. 1563 Met. Flight, Gloster Gladiators
                      No. 1654 Met. Flight, Gladiators

                      Notes:
                      SAAF=South African Air Force RAAF=Royal Australian Air Forces Det.=Detached Met.=Meteorological.

                      U.S. 9th Air Force Edit

                      Major General Lewis H. Brereton had his headquarters in Cairo, Egypt [21]

                        IX Advanced Headquarters in Tripoli, Libya[21] Headquarters in Tripoli [21] Headquarters at Benghazi, Libya[21]
                          , B-24D Liberator II
                            , Lete Airfield, Libya , Lete Airfield , Benina Airfield , Benina Airfield

                          Armed Forces Command Edit

                          German Edit

                          • 15th Panzergrenadier Division
                            Commanded by GeneralmajorEberhard Rodtfrom June 5. One third of the division (a reinforced infantry group) was attached to Italian XVI Corps and the rest to Italian XII Corps until the activation of XIV Panzer Corps on 18 July. [28]
                            • 215th Panzer Battalion-17 Tiger I tanks
                            • 104th Panzergrenadier Regiment
                            • 115th Panzergrenadier Regiment
                            • 129th Panzergrenadier Regiment
                            • 33rd Artillery Regiment
                            • 315th Antiaircraft Battalion
                            • 33rd Pioneer Battalion
                            • 1st Panzergrenadier Regiment "Hermann Göring"
                            • Panzer Regiment "Hermann Göring"
                              • 1 Panzer Battalion "Hermann Göring"
                              • 2 Panzer Battalion "Hermann Göring"

                              Italian 6th Army Edit

                              The Italian 6th Army was under the command of Generale d'Armata Alfredo Guzzoni. [nb 1]
                              German Army Liaison Officer: Generalleutnant Fridolin von Senger und Etterlin

                              Italian XII Corps Edit
                              • Italian XII Corps, Generale di Corpo d'Armata Mario Arisio, from 12 July: Generale di Corpo d'Armata Francesco Zingales
                                • 26 Mountain Infantry Division Assietta, General Francesco Scotti, from 26 July: General Ottorino Schreiber
                                  • 29th Infantry Regiment
                                  • 30th Infantry Regiment
                                  • 17th "Blackshirts" Legion
                                  • 25th Artillery Regiment
                                  • CXXVI Mortar Battalion
                                  • Engineer Battalion
                                  • 5th Infantry Regiment
                                  • 6th Infantry Regiment
                                  • 171st "Blackshirts" Legion
                                  • 22nd Artillery Regiment
                                  • XXVIII Mortar Battalion
                                  • Engineer Battalion
                                  • 124th Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                  • 142nd Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                  • 43rd Artillery Group (26x batteries, ad hoc regiment)
                                  • 138th Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                  • 139th Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                  • 51st Artillery Group (12x batteries, ad hoc regiment)
                                  • 133rd Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                  • 147th Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                  • 28th Artillery Group (6x batteries, ad hoc regiment)
                                  • 30x batteries
                                  • Mobile Group "A", initially at Paceco, Lieutenant Colonel Renato Perrone
                                    • XII Tank Battalion "L" Headquarter
                                    • 4th Company, CII Tank Battalion "R35" (Renault R35 tanks)
                                    • 1st Company, CXXXIII Semovente Battalion "47/32" (Semovente 47/32)
                                    • Coastal Infantry Company (motorized)
                                    • Artillery Battery (75/27 mod. 06 guns)
                                    • Anti-aircraft Artillery Section (20/65 mod. 35 anti-aircraft guns)
                                    • CXXXIII Semovente Battalion "47/32" Headquarter
                                    • 6th Company, CII Tank Battalion "R35" (Renault R35 tanks)
                                    • 3rd Company, CXXXIII Semovente Battalion "47/32" (Semovente 47/32)
                                    • 2x Coastal Infantry Companies (motorized)
                                    • Bersaglieri Platoon, on motorcycles
                                    • Artillery Battery (75/27 mod. 06 guns)
                                    • Anti-aircraft Artillery Section (20/65 mod. 35 anti-aircraft guns)
                                    • CII Tank Battalion "R35" Headquarter
                                    • 5th Company, CII Tank Battalion "R35" (Renault R35 tanks)
                                    • Coastal Infantry Company (motorized)
                                    • Anti-tank Company (47/32 mod. 35 anti-tank guns)
                                    Italian XVI Corps Edit
                                    • Italian XVI Corps, Generale di Corpo d'Armata Carlo Rossi
                                      • 4 Infantry Division Livorno (Initially held as Army Reserve [31] )
                                        Commanded by General Domenico Chirieleison
                                        • 33rd Infantry Regiment
                                        • 34th Infantry Regiment [32]
                                        • 28th Artillery Regiment (with 3x AA batteries, the standard was 2)
                                        • IV Semoventi Battalion "47/32" (Semovente 47/32)
                                        • Engineer Battalion
                                        • Assault Battalion
                                        • 75th Infantry Regiment
                                        • 76th Infantry Regiment
                                        • 173rd "Blackshirts" Legion
                                        • 54th Artillery Regiment
                                        • Engineer Battalion
                                        • 122nd Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                        • 123rd Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                        • 146th Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                        • 44th Artillery Group (14 xbatteries, ad hoc regiment)
                                        • CXXXIII Semovente Battalion "47/32" (Semovente 47/32)
                                        • 135th Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                        • Catania Harbour Garrison
                                        • 22nd Artillery Group (12x batteries, ad hoc regiment)
                                        • 134th Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                        • 178th Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                        • 9x artillery batteries
                                        • 140th Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                        • 179th Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                        • 4x artillery batteries
                                        • 19x batteries
                                        • Mobile Group "D", initially at Misterbianco, Lieutenant Colonel Massimino D'Andretta
                                          • CI Tank Battalion "R35" Headquarter
                                          • 3rd Company, CI Tank Battalion "R35" (Renault R35 tanks)
                                          • Infantry Company
                                          • Machine Gun Company, on motorcycles
                                          • Anti-tank Company (47/32 mod. 35 anti-tank guns)
                                          • Artillery Battery (75/18 mod. 34 howitzers)
                                          • Anti-aircraft Artillery Section (20/65 mod. 35 anti-aircraft guns)
                                          • 1st Company, CI Tank Battalion "R35" (Renault R35 tanks)
                                          • Coastal Infantry Company
                                          • Machine Gun Company, on motorcycles
                                          • Anti-tank Company (47/32 mod. 35 anti-tank guns)
                                          • Artillery Battery (75/18 mod. 34 howitzers)
                                          • Anti-aircraft Artillery Section (20/65 mod. 35 anti-aircraft guns)
                                          • 2nd Company, CI Tank Battalion "R35" (Renault R35 tanks), minus 1x platoon
                                          • Coastal Infantry Company
                                          • Machine Gun Company, on motorcycles
                                          • Anti-tank Company (47/32 mod. 35 anti-tank guns)
                                          • Artillery Battery (75/27 mod. 06 guns)
                                          • Blackshirt Battalion Headquarter
                                          • 1x platoon from the 2nd Company, CI Tank Battalion "R35"
                                          • Anti-tank Company (47/32 mod. 35 anti-tank guns)
                                          • Artillery Battery (75/18 mod. 34 howitzers)
                                            Headquarter
                                        • 2nd Tank Company "Fiat 3000" (Fiat 3000 tanks)
                                        • Anti-tank Company (47/32 mod. 35 anti-tank guns)
                                        • Artillery Battery (75/18 mod. 34 howitzers)
                                        • Mortar Platoon (81/14 mod. 35 mortars)
                                        • Navy garrison Edit

                                          The major harbors garrisons were under command of the Italian Navy. Hence, they were not part of the Italian 6th Army, but under the command of General Guzzoni, who was also the Chief of Joint Command.

                                          • Augusta-Siracusa Harbours
                                            • 121st Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                            • Navy Battalion
                                            • Air Force Battalion
                                            • 24x artillery batteries (coastal and AA batteries included)
                                            • 137th Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                            • 12x artillery batteries (coastal and AA batteries included)
                                            • 116th Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                            • 119th Coastal Infantry Regiment
                                            • Blackshirt Legion
                                            • Cavalry Battalion (on foot)
                                            • 55x artillery batteries (coastal and AA batteries included)
                                            XIV Panzer Corps Edit

                                            Activated 18 July [33] to take command of 15th Panzergrenadier Division, the Hermann Göring Division, the newly arrived 1st Parachute Division and the 29th Panzergrenadier Division which started to arrive in Sicily 18 July., General der Panzertruppe Hans-Valentin Hube.


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