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World War II Tactical Camouflage Techniques, Gordon L. Rottman


World War II Tactical Camouflage Techniques, Gordon L. Rottman

World War II Tactical Camouflage Techniques, Gordon L. Rottman

This is a fascinating little on a subject which impacted on all armies involved in the conflict, focusing on European and the Med war zones in all seasons (so no Japanese or jungle patterns) It’s a surprisingly interesting read and a great resource for war gamers, model makers and re-enactors.

As you would expect from an Osprey elite book it is lavishly illustrated with colour illustrations by the superb Peter Dennis and filled with period black and white photos which really bring the subject to life. Particularly interesting for modellers are the illustrations of gun emplacements and samples of vehicle camo. For the re-enactors the page on hermit camo and the section on face camo is a must.

One of the most interesting sections is about camo methods that not just didn’t work but actually made a vehicle more visible especially when painted on wheels or other moving parts.

It covers the technical theories of camouflage and concealment and light and shade and how that affects camouflage. The book looks at the materials used and covers the issues of netting and use of local materials in depth. Movement and the use of decoys as well as concealment from the air is also covered.

The down side is that this book just scratches the surface of a huge subject and although is great introduction it does serve to just wet your appetite to learn more. I would highly recommend having this book on your shelf if you are a modeller, war gamer or historical reenactor or even an airsoft player wishing to learn more about some practical tips

Chapters
Introduction
Principles of Camouflage
Camouflage materials
Individual Camouflage
Vehicle Camouflage
Camouflaging gun positions
Miscellanea
Conclusions
Further reading

Author: Gordon L. Rottman
Edition: Softcover
Pages: 64
Publisher: Osprey
Year: 2013



World War II Tactical Camouflage Techniques

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World War II Tactical Camouflage Techniques 1st Edition by Gordon L. Rottman and Publisher Osprey Publishing. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781780962764, 1780962762. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781780962740, 1780962746.

World War II Tactical Camouflage Techniques 1st Edition by Gordon L. Rottman and Publisher Osprey Publishing. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781780962764, 1780962762. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781780962740, 1780962746.


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World War II Tactical Camouflage Techniques

This 64 page paperback book is number 192 in the Elite series of books available from Osprey Publishing.

This book explains and illustrates the actual materials and techniques adopted (both successfully and unsuccessfully) by tactical units – I.e. the concealment of personnel, weapons, equipment, field positions, and movement by infantry riflemen and weapons crews, artillerymen, and vehicle crews. It covers all areas and seasons in the European and Mediterranean theaters of operations, for the US, British, German, and Soviet armies. It includes camouflage of the person, personal equipment, and weapons natural materials and “expedient” techniques issued camouflage materials such as nets, ponchos, etc. the principles of camouflaging equipment and vehicles, of positioning and terrain integration, the effects of light and shadow, and the use of decoy and dummy positions. Featuring meticulous full-color artwork and specially selected period photographs, this absorbing study casts new light on the camouflaging techniques developed by the major armies of World War II on a host of European battlefields.

The contents of this book are

  • Introduction
  • The Principles of Camouflage
  • Camouflage Materials
  • Individual Camouflage
  • Vehicle Camouflage
  • Camouflaging Gun Positions
  • Miscellanea
  • Conclusions
  • Further Reading
  • Index

This short book contains full color artwork illustrating various camouflage patterns, and numerous black and white photographs of different camouflage patterns on the battlefield. This excellent book is a definitive reference source for the historian, wargamer, modeler or diorama builder who wants to add more realism to his figures, vehicles or gun positions.


World War II Infantry Assault Tactics

Where are the tactics? This book suffers from the core problem of being completely misguided: the title says "Assault Tactics" but what we get is a laundry list of explosive devices being painstakenly described by colour, weight etc. The little snippets of actual tactics are dealt with in as broad a brush as possible, rendering them useless. The author follows field manuals, mainly from the US perspective, and drags on to a tedius pace covering commonplace explanations of very basic principles i Where are the tactics? This book suffers from the core problem of being completely misguided: the title says "Assault Tactics" but what we get is a laundry list of explosive devices being painstakenly described by colour, weight etc. The little snippets of actual tactics are dealt with in as broad a brush as possible, rendering them useless. The author follows field manuals, mainly from the US perspective, and drags on to a tedius pace covering commonplace explanations of very basic principles instead of rellying on the other tactics books of the series that already dealt with them. In doing so, Mr. Rottman neglects the promise given in the title and fails to answer the main question: How did the combatants manage to overcome enemy defenses in WWII, despite the presence of concrete bunkers, minefields, barbed wire and other obstacles.

The books starts with the sobering sentence that all military planning ends at the tip of the spear, serving the one single goal of enabling a platoon of grunts assaulting and taking a terrain feature right in front of them - "close with and destroy or capture the enemy by fire and maneuver" - but quickly loses its way and the author goes on to drone about very basic information regarding the rifle platoon (already done far better in the two books about infantry formations), followed by a lenghty explanation of defensive works and breaching material from page 7 to 20. The author then starts a morbid description of different demolition materials, listing colour, weight and other fluff. This ends by page 30, half of the book. Assault preparations start at page 43, and the assault proper only in page 48, with a paragraph in page 49.

Tactical explanations mainly delve into equipment with no actual case studies to be read. The national differences are interesting, even if only ten pages-long and very superficially. Only the main combatants are mentioned. Next time, instead of showing only Germans and Americans, the author could place other soldiers doing the jobs being described. A Free French team of Goumiers assaulting a hill in Italy, some Romenians solving an urban problem, Indian soldiers during an approach march, Free Polish closing the Falaise Pocket, etc. The author could have mentioned Italian assault tactics in siege warfare in North Africa, in which their Guastatori were very proficient in demining and assaults with satchel charges.

Another low blow is when the author says that a soldier throwing himself on top of barbed wire for his friends to cross is "dramatic" but useless due to time wasted untangling him but this is far too generic. I immediatly remembered the case of a 17-year old Israeli soldier in 1948 throwing himself, on his own initiative, on barbed wire while his platoon was under Jordanian fire, thus saving his unit. So it does have its usefulness. Battles are fought with weapons but won by men, unfortunately one would have the opposite idea through this book's narrative.

The heavy bias from US manuals is also tiresome, many remarks are made broadly when they only pertain to the Americans. Their lack of focus on the Infantry (seeing as a lesser duty) was not shared across the board, with the Germans, French, Japanese and Soviets placing heavy emphasis on infantry operations. The remark of junior leadership always being very inexperienced thus only allowing for very rudimentary tactical movements pertains only to the Americans and where definetly not the case with the Germans - especially in elite units such as the Fallschimrjäger.

There are only 4 photographs showing actual assault schematics and no plate shows movement and planning of any sort. Of 8 plates, 3 are wasted in demolition items with 15 items in plate C, 14 in plate D and 15 in E. It's very repetitive, with 8 marginally different types of pliers. The only interesting one was the Japanese bundle of Japanese Type 99 charges held together by wood. A better use of the plates would be different case studies with said material being used, instead of the loundry list we got.

The other plates show battle scenes with little value to understanding how the assault tactics actually worked. Plate A shows Germans cutting wiring, plate B shows a US Marine flamethrower team, plate F shows British soldiers placing a wall charge, plate G shows yet another US flamethrower team and plate H has a battlescene of Soviets attacking a German two-men steel pillbox. There are no plates showing the Japanese. Given the Japanese doctrine placed heavy emphasis on the infantry assault, their omission is puzzling - with only two clear photographs showing training, and one very blurry photo assumed to be in Corregidor showing an IJA flamethrower team.


World War II Tactical Camouflage Techniques Book Review

In Osprey's World War II Tactical Camouflage Techniques, author Gordon L. Rottman explains the various materials and techniques adopted by Army tactical units.

Rottman begins his narrative with a short introduction recapping how sophisticated weaponry necessitated developing camouflage practices after World War I.

Subsequent segments on specific camouflage resources and methods dominate this handy reference. Here, the author covers essentials of US, British, German and Soviet practices – from the individual soldier to artillery emplacements in the European and Mediterranean theaters of operation.

Over 40 historical photographs and artwork by Peter Dennis complement the Rottman's text. One drawing and supporting text proved sadly funny. An RAF Nissen hut on pg 57 demonstrates poorly planned camouflage application, whitewashed rocks signaling the building's alignment. Yet another depressing example, sad to say, of military genius.


Produktdetails

Format ePUB i
Kopierschutz Ja i
Family Sharing Nein i
Text-to-Speech Nein i
Seitenzahl 64 (Printausgabe)
Erscheinungsdatum 20.02.2013

World War Ii Tactical Camouflage Techniques PDF

Camouflage at the tactical level &ndash i.e. by individual soldiers and small units &ndash was standard practice for all World War II armies, since battlefield camouflage was one of many tactical techniques and skills essential for survival, and for the success of both defensive and offensive operations. Nevertheless, it was often poorly taught during training, and &ndash at first &ndash neglected by units under pressure of events. Troops therefore had to learn the hard way just how essential it was to master these techniques, given the long effective range of weapons and the effectiveness of enemy reconnaissance.

This book explains and illustrates the actual materials and techniques adopted (both successfully, and unsuccessfully) by tactical units &ndash i.e. the concealment of personnel, weapons, equipment, field positions, and movement by infantry riflemen and weapons crews, artillerymen, and vehicle crews. It covers all areas and seasons in the European and Mediterranean theaters of operations, for the US, British, German, and Soviet armies. It includes camouflage of the person, personal equipment, and weapons natural materials and &ldquoexpedient&rdquo techniques issued camouflage materials such as nets, ponchos, etc the principles of camouflaging equipment and vehicles, of positioning and terrain integration, the effects of light and shadow, and the use of decoy and dummy positions.

Featuring meticulous full-color artwork and specially selected period photographs, this absorbing study casts new light on the camouflaging techniques developed by the major armies of World War II on a host of European battlefields.


Author updates

As infantry units advanced across Europe the only support they could rely on from day to day was that provided by the heavy weapons of their own units. While thundering tanks struck fear into the hearts of their enemies it was the machine guns, mortars and light cannon that proved to be most important, causing the majority of casualties suffered during World War II. Common principles were shared across units but the wide variety of weapons available to the different armies altered the way they were used in battle.

Focusing on the US, British, German and Soviet troops, this title offers a comprehensive guide to infantry fire support tactics used through World War II. Combat reports are complemented by specially commissioned artwork to show the way in which tactics varied, and highlight how developments obliged opposing armies to review their own methods.

Gordon L. Rottman’s classic western, The Hardest Ride, is the winner of the Western Fictioneers Peacemaker Award for Best Western Novel 2014, Western Fictioneers Peacemaker Award Finalist for Best First Western Novel 2014, Western Writers of America Spur Award Finalist for Best Traditional Western Novel for 2013.
The Texas-Mexico border, the winter of 1886—The Great Die Up. A raw rift separates Mexicans and Anglos. A loner cowpoke and a mute Mexican girl fight man and nature to reunite.
An out of work cowpoke, Bud Eugen, comes across Marta, a mute sixteen-year old Mexican girl whose family has been killed by Indians. Bud reluctantly takes her along, even though he’s never had to accommodate another person in his simple life. He’s unable to find anyone willing to take her. In spite of his prejudices, Bud grows to like the spunky girl (and her excellent cooking).
Eventually, they both find work on a border ranch. Here, the relationship between the girl and the young cowboy hesitantly grows. But banditos raid the ranch, kidnapping the rancher’s daughters and Marta. Bud, with twelve other men, pursue the banditos into the most desolate reaches of Mexico. Ambushes and battles with banditos, Rurales, and traitors are constant, and the brutal weather is as much a threat as the man-made perils. Life and death choices are made at every turn as one side gains the advantage, then the other.
The rancher’s daughters are rescued, and the exhausted party turns back. But Bud presses on alone, against insurmountable odds, determined to fulfill his unspoken promise to Marta.

A USA TODAY and Amazon bestseller, author Gordon L. Rottman has finally given fans of The Hardest Ride and Ride Harder their beloved heroine Marta’s own tale, and in a way, her own voice.

The brutal 1886 winter on the Texas-Mexico border is a terrible time for a mute sixteen-year-old Mexican girl and her familia, who roam the trails and towns of the frontier, searching for work and struggling to survive. When her parents and siblings are murdered before her eyes, Marta is faced with a stark reality. Completely alone in the harsh Texas backlands, she realizes her own time in this world will be short, lonely, and possibly end in blood.

Marta has not lived and thrived in her hardscrabble life thus far to give up without a fight. And the arrival of an out of work cowboy from whom she grudgingly accepts help and protection gives her a sliver of hope. Besides she reasons, Güero—Blondie—as she’s named him, would be lost without her care, guidance, and decent meals. Despite the chasm between Mexicans and Anglos in this harsh age, the loner cowpoke and mute Mexican girl tentatively build a fragile trust.

Finding work on a welcoming ranch, the couple bonds, and their future appears brighter. But a raid by vicious bandits takes Marta, another Mexican girl, and the rancher’s two daughters on a journey into hell. Marta tells us a harrowing tale of terror and anguish as the women struggle to stay alive and hang on to their sanity. Her faith in Güero coming to their rescue rises and diminishes day-to-day as their circumstances change. In the end, there is a great deal more to Marta than we ever realized.


A Visual Guide to the Fake Fleets and Inflatable Armies of World War II

The image above depicts a clever trick played on battlefields during World War II: Bobbing next to a sturdy metal tank is a rubber inflatable copy meant to fool enemies. An army could look twice as large as it was thanks to elite divisions of the military that specialized in the art of decoys and deception.

Military units within both the Allied and Axis forces practiced and deployed an assortment of peculiar, yet effective tactics, from building inflated dummy tanks to constructing wooden artillery and straw airplanes. A fleet of dummy tanks could lead an enemy to overestimate a force’s actual strength or draw an attack away from a vulnerable area, explained Gordon Rottman in World War II Tactical Camouflage Techniques.

Two U.S. soldiers examine a fake tank made out of wood. It was built on top of a German four-ton truck. NARA/111-SC-196913-001

“Decoys are extremely important in deception planning,” stated an U.S. army field manual published in 1978. Something as simple as “a log sticking out of a pile of brush can draw a lot of attention and artillery fire.”

New photos uncovered by the National Archives reveal the elaborate artistry behind building a “fake army.” The featured photos taken between 1942 and 1945 depict the variety of creative deception tactics developed by the Japanese, German, and British military.

In Okinawa, these fake straw planes were innocently sitting along the edges of the airfields near Kadena Town. They caused many American pilots to send bursts of machine gun fire into them. NARA/111-SC-205559-001

During both World Wars, artists, filmmakers, scientists, and sculptors were handpicked by the military and called upon to use their visual and creative skills to design camouflage and decoys. Beginning in World War I, artists used “dazzle camouflage” and painted battleships with odd, multicolored patterns to distract far-off enemies, while female art students designed camouflage “rock” suits that they tested in Van Cortlandt Park in New York.

A dummy 155mm gun erected in Forte dei Marmi Area, Italy. These guns were used along with flash simulators to deceive the enemy.* NARA/111-SC-233236-001

The United States recruited over a thousand men from art schools and ad agencies for the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops, or “Ghost Army,” which staged more than 20 battlefield deceptions between 1944 and 1945. In England, a group of surrealist artists started the Industrial Camouflage Research Unit just after the war began in September 1939, wrote Peter Forbes in Dazzled and Deceived: Mimicry and Camouflage.

Japan’s advanced decoy techniques are well-illustrated by this view of a dummy tank found on Iwo Jima. It was constructed out of consolidated volcanic ash, which is soft and can easily be cut with a knife. NARA/111-SC-208998-001

The dummies took on many forms, including stationary structures that supplied the outline of machinery and a simulation that was mounted on a truck. Inventions could be simple and crude, such as stacking up old tires and propping up a log to simulate an artillery piece, explained Kenneth Blanks in his thesis on tactical decoys.

On the other hand, some deceptions were large-scale, such as fake roads and bridges made out of canvas and burlap. At a distance, the elaborate dummy tanks could easily be confused for the real thing. They were made of an assortment of canvas and plywood, inflated rubber, and drain pipes to form the gun. A Japanese fake tank constructed out of rubble and volcanic ash was commended for its attention to detail and artistry. Inflated tanks were not only used to trick the enemy, but also served to practice formations.

Many of the dummies were also easy to transport and assemble. An inflatable tank could be unfurled from a duffle bag, pumped with air from a generator, and completed in just 20 minutes.

Watch soldiers set up inflatable decoys in the video below:

Entire decoy airfields were made by Britain’s Royal Air Ministry. Instead of hiding the easily spotted structures, they designed dummy airfields filled with dummy planes that were imitations of satellite stations. The unit also lit oil fires, called “starfishes,” in harmless locations after the first wave of a bombing raid, making subsequent waves believe those areas were targets, explained Forbes. While preserving the real fleet, the tactic wasted the enemy’s bombs and ammunition.

This dummy plane stood beneath a shelter at Camp Chorrera in Panama. Taken in 1942. NARA/111-SC-237644-001

And these efforts proved to be extremely effective. For example, in the summer of 1940, Colonel J.F. Turner of the Royal Air Ministry organized 100 dummy airfields and built about 400 dummy aircrafts to confuse German aerial bombers. In one raid on August 4, 1940, three waves of bombs struck the decoy structures, leaving the real factory almost unscathed. Turner’s sophisticated dummy aircrafts “saved hundreds of lives and vital war production facilities,” wrote Blanks. Similarly, the U.S. military’s Ghost Army saved tens of thousands of soldiers’ lives, estimated The Atlantic.

A soldier stands next to a British dummy tank. NARA/111-SC-217854-001

This ingenious craft has since faded with time. Sophisticated surveillance technologies, such as satellites and drones, have since made ballooned tanks, straw airplanes, and other visual ruses less effective. But the decoy armies of World War II remain a captivating example of the intricate art of military deception and trickery in action.

Explore more dummy installations from World War II below.

A dummy bridge built out of canvas and burlap. It was partially destroyed by Germans who saw it above the city of Pisa. NARA/111-SC-219216-001 When deflated, these large dummy tanks are compact and easy to carry. NARA/111-SC-217851-001 Made by the British Army, this deflated rubber tank only needs 20 minutes to assemble. NARA/111-SC-216201-001 A British army engineer uses a forge pump to inflate the turret of a rubber dummy tank. The tanks were designed and used by the British to simulate tank positions in the field. Taken in Italy in 1944. NARA/111-SC-217856-001 Here, a soldier is inflating the body of the tank. NARA/111-SC-217852-001 A soldier stands next to an inflated dummy tank made of rubber. NARA/111-SC-217857-001 Two soldiers prop the tank on its side. NARA/111-SC-217853-001 British soldiers place a dummy tank into a camouflaged position. NARA/111-SC-216204-001 A fake Japanese AA gun constructed around a fish oil and acid producing factory off a beach in Japan. NARA/111-SC-213310-001 Dummy Japanese gun emplacements along the beach at Rendova Island. NARA/111-SC-18592-001 An American soldier looks at one of the German dummy tanks near Metz, France. NARA/111-SC-196519-s-001 A pole camouflaged as a gun left behind by the Nazis. NARA/111-SC-201374-001 A dummy pontoon bridge made out of wood frames covered with cloth. It took the 84th Engineers 12 hours to build the bridge across the Rhine River at Petersau, Germany. It was meant to fool the Germans into thinking there were more bridges across the river than there actually were. NARA/111-SC-222564-001

*Correction: An earlier version of this story misspelled a location in Italy. It is Forte dei Marmi, not Forte dei Maimi.


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