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Legendary Black Knights: Mysterious Medieval Entities of Neutrality


Black Knights began to appear in history during the Middle Ages. Since the 13th century, a series of legends mentioning the mysterious Black Knights emerged. Although the Black Knights were said to have carried out good deeds and fought to protect cities from unjust rulers and other threats, texts referring to these legends were censored and banned by the Church during the medieval period. Nevertheless, the story of the legendary black knight Ashor endured over the centuries.

Black Knights in Arthurian Legends

The figure of the Black Knight appears in several Arthurian legends as an ambiguous motif who often emerges as a competitor for one of the better-known Arthurian knights . It’s also the role that a couple of the Arthurian knights have had.

As an example of the first, Sir Percival fights a Black Knight after exchanging rings with the other knight’s wife, creating confusion and conflict. In the second reference to the Arthurian Black Knight, we see Sir Lancelot dressing up as a black knight as a disguise. But the best known example of a Black Knight in Arthurian legends is undoubtedly Sir Morien, the son of Sir Agrovale and a Moorish princess, causing him to be referred to by this title due to his African lineage .

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Old metal knight armor on a black background . ( Ivan Kurmyshov /Adobe Stock)

Ashor the King Killer and Priest Savior

The origin of Black Knights is closely linked to the legend of Ashor, a knight who had remained skilled and strong, despite his advanced age, and who specialized in the killing of kings and other nobles. Sometime around the 13th or 14th century there was a king with a powerful enemy – a king of another land who oppressed his people.

Desperate to defeat his opponent, the good king sent a message calling Ashor to his court. One night, the king woke up to find Ashor near his bed. The assassin had entered his castle without detection – proving his skill.

Ashor asked the king who he needed to kill and the king gave his order. Ashor accepted the task, but said that he would first check the king’s claims that his enemy was an evil oppressor. Ashor entered the fortress city of the king’s enemy, and witnessed for himself the cruelty of the ruler; his task to assassinate the king would proceed as planned.

‘The Black Knight.’ ( theflickerees / deviantart)

Ashor discovered that an old priest who had once risen up against the cruelty of the evil king was being held prisoner in the dungeon. After fulfilling his order to kill the king, Ashor, who was moved by the priest’s story, decided to free him from the prison. He entered the dungeon and found the man in a very bad state.

The imprisoned priest was very weak and could barely stand. Unfortunately, the priest proved to be a burden, making it difficult for Ashor to escape. While carrying the old man out of the dungeon, the knight was injured. Nevertheless, the two got up on a horse, escaped the city, and made for the woods.

The black knight had freed the city from its evil king and he had escaped. However, with people in pursuit, Ashor understood that he could not tend to his wounds in time and he descended from the horse, telling the priest that he would not slow him down and he must continue. The priest thanked him, gave him his blessing and left as instructed.

The Fight for the Legendary Knight’s Soul

Ashor waited for his end near a tree. Soon, as blood left the knight’s body, a demon appeared before him telling the knight that his soul belonged to him and he had come to claim him. Before the demon could take Ashor’s soul, an angel also appeared, saying that the knight’s soul belonged to him and that he had come to take it with him to Heaven. Apparently, the knight’s good deeds had been just a little more numerous than his bad ones and he had been forgiven.

As the two entities were getting ready to clash over the human’s soul, a third entity appeared. At this time, the angel and the demon had stopped fighting as if they had been frozen. The third entity had no form.

In order to be visible, it had appeared as a figure in a black cloak. However, nothing could be seen coming out of the cloak: no hands, no feet, no face. This third entity was Il Separatio , the Anonymous one, the keeper of universal balance, the one who cannot be named.

Il Separatio Confronts the Black Knight

Anonymous is the personification of perfect neutrality. He is neither good, nor evil, he is beyond all divisions. Il Separatio spoke and said that the knight had done just as much good as he had done evil. Therefore, neither the angel nor the demon could claim his soul. He belonged to Il Separatio. At that moment, both the angel and the demon disappeared and Anonymous turned to the knight.

A statue of the Anonymous One, Il Separatio, Budapest, Hungary. ( Vajdahunyad Castle )

Ashor’s wounds had been healed. He got up and talked to Il Separatio. The entity told Ashor that he had become free and no longer belonged to ‘the system’. He was outside it, beyond it. Il Separatio told the knight that he could do whatever he wanted, that he could live for as long as he wanted, that he could travel anywhere (including other planets). When he was to become bored of all of this, then he was to call upon Il Separatio to stand before him once again and tell him about the true purpose of their existence.

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Ashor was told that, as he was no longer part of the system, his actions no longer mattered for the world. Should he do good deeds, other would do bad deeds and the universal balance would remain unchanged. Should he do bad deeds, others would do good deeds and, again, the balance of the universe would remain the same.

According to legend, Il Separatio disappeared once he finished his explanation, while the knight Ashor still lives among humans today. It is said that he had chosen to do good deeds as a black knight, even though his actions no longer mattered for the world. Ashor, the Immortal, remains the prototype for the image of the black knight.

A black knight with a long cloak stands holding a sword against a blue Eclipse. ( warmtail /Adobe Stock)


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The Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog

For centuries, the Quest for the Holy Grail has parabled the elusive quest for success. With mystical power, the Grail adapts to each searchers unique (and often changing) goal. In the US — lacking medieval history, and with capitalism as a national religion — we favor epic entrepreneurial tales over allegorical myth. Most recently, unicorn hunts. Still, the Holy Grail, and quests for it, are easy business metaphors —with relevant teachings for both startups and incumbents. Its’ best-known telling, for a generation anyway, is the movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

In case you’re wondering about business lessons from a Monty Python satire, know that John Cleese — when he hung up his comedy cleats — became a (highly paid) management consultant. He has a library of business training videos. Like the film — and unlike most business training — they’re informative and fun. In Cleese’s management training, the lessons are obvious. But anyone can play the easy chord — in this blog, we do the work. Better for retention.

To me, Monty Python is side-splitting. I know not everyone agrees. Monty Python is like truffles. Relished by some, abhorred by others — and a 3rd group doesn’t understand what all the fuss is about. With truffles, it’s a chemical thing — androstenone specifically, and whether someone has a negative hyper-sensitivity, positive affinity, or a complete inability to smell it. With Monty Python, I can’t say.

The genesis of the (non-satirical) grail story is Celtic mythology. If, like me, you ignored mythology since high school (what class was that anyway?), you might take a fresh look. Mythology’s ancient authors had minds like modern humans — capable of sophisticated thinking, albeit less our sophisticated technology. No smart phones, yet every bit as smart.

Mythology is the product of observing — and striving to make sense — of the world. Ancient folklore was fodder for monumental thinkers who — lacking electron microscopes and fMRIs and the Hadron Collider and the Hubble Telescope and Facebook — divined and codified explanations for the world around them: why winds blow violently, the sun rises daily, seasons recur endlessly — and where did we come from? Plus — importantly — why people should cooperate, pay taxes, repress primal urges, and refrain from lopping-off each others heads. Also, when and why people should lop-off heads (as directed).

Homer, Euripides, and Sophocles drew from millennia of oral tradition for their tales. For a couple millennia afterwards, writers incorporated and modified these early myths into new ones. Including the Grail myth.

In Monty Python and the Holy Grail, the Legendary Black Beast of Arrrghhh lives in the Cave of Caerbannog — Arrrghhh being the final utterance of anyone who encounters the creature. Guarding that cave is a mysterious and vicious creature — so terrifying that the mere description has Sir Robin soiling his armor.

Guided by a strange looking wizard named Tim, King Arthur and his knights arrive at the cave — to find the feared beast is a cuddly-looking rabbit.

Even without watching the movie (or excerpted clip), you can deduce that the seemingly harmless bunny is the proverbial wolf in sheep’s clothing. After decapitating Roundtable knight Bors — who’d swaggered over to slay the “beast” — the carnage continues until King Arthur’s signature retreat call: “Run Away!”

As it turns out, a knight fleeing a rabbit was a common mediaeval visual metaphor for cowardice — and Monty Python’s inspiration for the Killer Bunny. The picture below is from a frieze on the Notre Dame cathedral.

While this carving is about morality — specifically, the vice of cowardice — this post isn’t. It’s about business in the midst of societal liminality when everyone knows the “old way” is dead, yet nobody quite knows the new one.

The last time we saw today’s level of technology-driven upheaval, Blockbuster ruled in-home movies, Kodak dominated photography, Borders was the most respected brand in books, and Blackberry owned the Fortune 500.

Those companies all had globally-recognized brands, superior operational expertise, defensive moats, scale, and world-class technical talent. Three of the four even had adoring customers.

The common disease of these once-iconic brands? Institutionalized narcissism. Borders was sure e-commerce couldn’t supplant their in-store experience. Kodak, that nothing could replace the quality of film and loyalty to their beloved brand. Blackberry, that email was everything, and corporations would never risk less secure platforms. Blockbuster, that they’d conquered in-home movie rentals (dismissing Netflix when they approached them about a sale) and whatever was to follow.

Creative destruction is part of business, and life — it’s not breaking news. Companies learn and adapt. These brands’ demise taught survivors to nurture awareness of emerging technologies, and to urgently develop digital transformation chops (which requires open-mindedness). The fate of these four companies was extraordinary because each was digitally aware — and somewhat adept — at a time most weren’t. They were each positioned to dominate, even to define, emerging, technology-driven replacement markets. Technical innovation didn’t kill them. Arrogance did.

Just as King Arthur’s knights died ignoring expert advice (it happened to come from a wise elder — the hubris could just as easily be an elder ignoring a young knight), after idolizing a superficial image, with ensuing folly. Plus impatiently jumping to a conclusion without considering consequences. All are vices portrayed alongside cowardice on Notre Dame’s facade.

Which brings us back to mythology — and to Rome. The ancient Romans were attuned to the perils of narcissism. The myth of Narcissus is the root of the word. It actually predates the Romans — originating in ancient Greece.

In ancient Roman society, evidence suggests there was a unique role: the Auriga, a trusted, high-status slave who chauffeured leaders and — in the staged pageantry of Roman Triumphs — stood behind a conquering Commander whispering Memento homo (“remember you are only a man”) to check his ego against over-inflation. The kind of over-inflation that makes a leader obsess over crowd size at the equivalent of his Roman Triumph.

In 2018, organizations don’t have Auriga’s. Maybe that explains the Google Trends chart below. “Compassion,” in red, is flat. “Sinus Infection,” in gold, climbs steadily around its seasonal fluctuation. “Narcissism,” in blue, has tripled — with all-time highs for a brief peak in March 2015, and again this year. If the trend continues, more people will soon search for help with narcissism than for stuffy noses.

Like their still-in-use aqueducts, ancient Rome’s humanistic understanding stands and remains relevant. Latin etymologies make Roman mythology seem particularly familiar, but the giants of psychology both considered mythology transcendent. Sigmund Freud said: “The theory of the instincts is so to say our mythology. Instincts are mythical entities magnificent in their indefiniteness”. His long-time collaborator Carl Jung wrote: “Mythological motifs are facts they never change only theories change.”

It is through mythology that Jung developed his archetypal framework for human behavior, since engrained in — amongst other things — the Myers-Briggs Personality Index and pretty much all major advertising. Archetypes are dynamic, ebbing and flowing through our minds and cultures. In Part 2 we’ll dive into the evolution of archetypes in 4IR, along with strategies to defend against becoming the next Borders Books — or getting decapitated by cute bunnies.


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Knighthood As It Was, Not As We Wish It Were Origins

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  • In Chivalry in Medieval England, Nigel Saul aspires to these aims as he discusses one of the most distorted topics in medieval history: the code of chivalry
  • Although not without its minor faults, Saul delivers on his promise to separate the common impression of chivalry as a fantastical code of conduct for brave and heroic knights from the

Clothing, Armor, and Weapons of a Mid Thirteenth-Century

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  • By the middle of the 13th century, padded armours like the cuisses had been fully developed and these were widely used on various parts of the body
  • This knight is wearing a gambeson which will be covered in mail, while the lesser ranks of foot-soldier would use them as their only form of protection in battle.

Knight and Medieval Jousting Short history website

  • The medieval tournament is one of the enduring images of the Middle Ages, with knights fighting to impress beautiful and unattainable ladies
  • In reality, jousting was a dangerous sport and participants undertook years of training before risking their safety in a tournament
  • Jousting was most popular between the tenth and fifteenth centuries.

Knights and Chivalry in Medieval England

  • Knights After the lord on the social ladder came the knight
  • The path to knighthood began at the age of seven when a vassal sent his son to the lord's house to become a page
  • For seven years a page was cared for by the women of the house, who instructed him …

Medieval Occupations and Jobs: Knight. The training to

  • Medieval knights had to go through years of training in the use of weapons, horsemanship, and warfare
  • Frequently, members of the noble class, knights were responsible for defending their feudal lord’s territory from rivals and keeping the local serfdom in line with the lord’s rule.

Fascinating Medieval Knight Armor History Ancient Pages

  • Different Parts Of A Medieval Knights Armor
  • Generally, it was basic knowledge that during the medieval period and in history, the gallant knights represented a group of elite warriors
  • This was the reason why blacksmiths established an armor that was crafted to …

Amazon.com: The Knight in History (Medieval Life

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From the Knights Templars and English knighthood to the crusades and chivalry, The Knight in History, by acclaimed medievalist Frances Gies, bestselling coauthor of Life in a Medieval Castle, paints a remarkable true picture of knighthood—exploring the knight’s earliest appearance as an agent of lawless violence, his reemergence as a dynamic social entity, his eventual disappearance from the European …

Middle Ages for Kids: Knight's Coat of Arms

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Medieval Monasteries Glossary and Terms Knights and Castles Becoming a Knight Castles History of Knights Knight's Armor and Weapons Knight's coat of arms Tournaments, Jousts, and Chivalry: Culture Daily Life in the Middle Ages Middle Ages Art and Literature The Catholic Church and Cathedrals Entertainment and Music The King's Court Major Events

What It Was Like to be a Knight During Medieval Times

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When we think of knights during the medieval times, we think of valiant men who chose to defend their honor in feats of jousting, chivalry, and dragon slayin


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White Nights, Mikhail Baryshnikov & Gregory Hines

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  • White Nights, Mikhail Baryshnikov & Gregory Hines - tap dance
  • Music: Prove Me Wrong by David Pack

A Definitive List of Notable and Famous Medieval Knights

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  • A Definitive List of Notable and Famous Medieval Knights
  • King Arthur's men were just some of the notable knights who with their tales of courage and camaraderie, romanticized the pages of medieval history
  • Browse through this article to find out more about knighthood and these men of valor.

White Nights in St. Petersburg, Russia

  • From late May to early July the nights are bright in St
  • Petersburg, with the brightest period, the White Nights, normally lasting from June 11 th to July 2 nd.The White Nights (Beliye Nochi) are a curious phenomenon caused by St
  • Petersburg's very northerly geographical location - at 59 degrees 57' North (roughly on the same latitude as Oslo, Norway, the southern tip of Greenland and Seward

10 Terrible Bigots in Modern History

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  • Samuel Bowers Samuel Bowers was the Imperial Wizard (leader) of the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, a particularly violent branch of the Klan that was active in Mississippi during the Civil Rights Movement
  • He formed the group in 1963 and within a …

White Nights [Original Soundtrack]

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  • In the vapid video age, music often overshadowed the accompanying movie
  • While most of these soundtracks slipped through the cracks and into obscurity or the delete bins, some (Footloose, Flashdance) became blockbusters.White Nights definitely belongs to that elite second group, because unlike most vinyl film collections, the platter actually survived the transition to CD.

The Knights Templar and Knights Hospitaller

  • Knights were the most visible branch of the order, and wore the famous white mantles to symbolize their purity and chastity
  • Some of the Order's most senior positions were reserved for sergeants, including the post of Commander of the Vault of Acre, who was the de facto Admiral of the Templar fleet.

Watch Baryshnikov Do 11 Pirouettes in "White Nights"

  • Pure cinema gold—and one of the most famous dance movie scenes of all time
  • In this clip from the 1985 hit movie White Nights, Misha combines his technical prowess with his effortless cool
  • Raymond, played by legendary tapper Gregory Hines, challenges Kolya, a Soviet dancer who has defected (played by Baryshnikov) to a bet.

Thousands of NAMES OF KNIGHTS AND TITLES for your dog or

  • White Knight Black Knight (Dane Whitman) Wolfdietrich Yuber WHITE KNIGHTS: Don Quixote Joan of Arc
  • The Lone Ranger Crusader Rabbit LINKS: 1066 LIST OF KNIGHTS List of those accompanying William the Conqueror on his Invasion of England in 1066 LIST OF KNIGHTS

Thomas Asbridge’s top 10 knights in literature Books

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  • Yet he was from far being the only knight, whether historical or fictional, to leave his mark on the middle ages
  • Here are 10 of the best works revealing the careers of other famous

Complete list of all active hate groups in the U.S. WTTV

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Members of Fraternal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan in Pulaski, Tennessee (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) This is an archived article …

Mikhail Baryshnikov in White Nights_ So moving dance scene

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"White nights" 1985Mikhail BaryshnikovAn incredible and so moving film!!-HIGHLIGHTS-0:440:521:011:191:361:441:582:02☆SHARE THIS VIDEO BY THIS LINK :https://y

Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron-165 [HMM-165]

  • The White Knights returned home from Saudi Arabia in March of 1991
  • HMM-165 was the "last squadron in the Philippine Islands" when they supported the …

White Knight, White Teeth: Medieval Dentistry

  • As it turns out, the medieval dentistry era saw many people with teeth in shades similar to the bright armor of famous white knights! Societal Influence
  • White teeth (and pleasant breath) was a desirable trait at all levels of medieval society, from the lowest peasant to the highest lord
  • As many of us know, societal and peer pressure is a

Evercreech Falls, White Knights Walk and Epic Camping at

  • Initially, Evercreech Forest Reserve was intended to be a quick stop to check out Evercreech Falls and the famous “White Knights of Evercreech”
  • However, after seeing just how beautiful the reserve was, and the fact that we’d have it all to ourselves, we couldn’t help but stay the night.

Middle Ages for Kids: History of the Medieval Knight

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  • The Knights Templar - The Knights Templar were established in the 1100s
  • They wore white mantles with red crosses and were famous fighters during the Crusades
  • Their headquarters was in the Al-Aqsa Mosque on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.

Laguman Gurung's Blog: The White Knight

  • The White Knight – Eric Nicol
  • Genre: Allegory Point of view: The story is narrated in Third Person
  • Setting: The story is based on the concept of medieval role of the knights and takes place in forest of life
  • Protagonist: White knight: White knight in the story represent good, Champion of virtue, honour, and justice.In addition, symbolizes ignorance.

Two Years Ago, They Marched in Charlottesville. Where Are

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In each of these cities, white supremacist murderers acted on the threat embodied in the chant made famous in Charlottesville: “Jews will not replace us! Klan members from the Rebel Brigade Knights, Global Crusader Knights, Confederate White Knights, and Knights Party racist skinheads from the Hammerskins, Crew 38,

Imperial Knight Warhammer 40k Wiki Fandom

An Imperial Knight, or Questor Imperialis in High Gothic, is a type of robotic combat walker in the service of the Imperium and sometimes the Adeptus Mechanicus.Each Knight is piloted by a single human warrior drawn from an ancient feudal aristocratic culture that stretches across the galaxy.However, a Knight is smaller and less capable in combat than even the smallest class of true Titan

White Knight (Fitzgibbon family)

  • The White Knight is one of three Hiberno-Norman hereditary knighthoods within Ireland dating from the medieval period
  • The title was first conferred upon Maurice Fitzgibbon in the early 14th century
  • The other two knighthoods are Fitzgerald: Knight of Glin (also called the Black Knight), which has become dormant after 700 years (since the passing of the 29th Knight, September 2011), and

Marine Medium Tilt Rotor Squadron 165

  • Sergeant Major, Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 165
  • Charles La Tour was born in Blythe, California and raised in Phoenix, Arizona
  • He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps August 10, 1999
  • Upon completion of training at Recruit Depot San Diego and School of Infantry West, he was assigned to 1st Battalion, 6th Marines (1/6) in Camp

Ku Klux Klan: Origin, Members & Facts

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  • The Ku Klux Klan (KKK) is an American white supremacist terrorist hate group founded in 1865
  • It became a vehicle for white southern resistance to the Republican Party’s Reconstruction-era

Twitter White Knights Against Sexy Female Comic Characters

  • Home / Social / Twitter White Knights Against Sexy Female Comic Characters The latest attempt to take shots at the artist comes in the form of another artist’s “fixes” of one of his most famous and beloved pieces
  • The cover was for The Amazing Spider-Man #601 and featured Peter’s love, Mary Jane Watson, sitting on a couch and

I'm done with the Knights of Columbus National Catholic

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  • I'm done! I'm done with the Knights of Columbus
  • I have been a member of the Knights of Columbus for 33 years
  • I am a fourth degree Knight, which is as far up the ranks as I …

The White Knight's Song by Lewis Carroll

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  • Read, review and discuss the The White Knight's Song poem by Lewis Carroll on Poetry.com
  • Poetry.com is a huge collection of poems from famous and amateur poets from around the world — collaboratively published by a community of authors and contributing editors.

White Nights by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

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  • White Nights is a short story by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, originally published in 1848
  • The short story is divided into six sections: First Night, Second Night, Nastenka's Story, Third Night, Fourth Night, Morning
  • First Night: The narrator describes his experience walking in the streets of St
  • He loves the city at night, and feels

40 Hate Organizations Active In Pennsylvania, Map Shows

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Ku Klos Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, Meadville: Ku Klux Klan Image: In this April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in cross and swastika burnings after a "white


Relics Are Perplexing Objects of the Past

Few people outside of South America have ever heard of this most mysterious and controversial emblem of power, which according to some sources, may be the ultimate source of mysteries.

Tradition holds that the Baton of Command (a direct translation of its Spanish name, Bastón de Mando, which in turn translates as Simihuinqui — the name given to it by the South American tribesmen) was crafted some eight thousand years ago by Multán (also known as Voltán), a mighty chieftain of the Comechingones tribe, from a piece of black basalt. The occult powers of this ancient artifact were legendary among the tribes of the modern Argentinean Chaco and the Bolivian lowlands, and in the 1830’s, an Araucanian warlord named Calfucurá–well steeped in his people’s traditions–led a massive search for the object in the mountain ranges of Tandil, Balrcarce, San Luis and Córdoba which did not turn up the Baton of Command.

It is at this point that we must delve into the other esoteric tradition linked to this black basalt wand: students of the occult believe that aside from its neolithic age, the Baton of Command is tied in to the European tradition of the Holy Grail, which has been handed down to us through Arthurian legend and Wagnerian opera and is far removed from fiction.

These esoterics, like the late Argentinean scholar Guillermo Terrera, believe that the 12th century chansons de geste of Chretien de Troyes and Wolfram Von Eschenbach make allusions to the Baton of Command and to the existence of South America–a landmass whose existence Medieval man could not have suspected.

While these allegations would quite rightly be dismissed as crankery in the hallowed halls of academe, Terrera and his followers nevertheless make an intriguing case for their beliefs. According to these esoteric revisionists, mythological sources in Central and Eastern Asia make reference to a mysterious character entrusted with the custody of two sacred items: one of them the so-called Holy Grail o Sangraal, and the other being “the Stone of Wisdom”, which they identify as the Baton of Command.

The enigmatic custodian of these items would have begun his career thousands of years ago, and is only known as the “Man from Persia” — the Parsifal of Eschenbach’s songs, and the Sir Perceval of the Arthurian Cycle. According to the German minstrel’s epic, the enigmatic Parsifal travelled to the land of Argentum (“…the secret gates of a silent land named Argentum and will always be…”) to lay the objects under his care in the sacred hill known as Vlarava. Extrapolating from the epic poem, these esotericists have identified Argentum with Argentina and the sacred mount Vlarava with Mount Uritorco in the country’s northern reaches.

Putting aside their reliance on late Medieval epic for a moment, Terrera and his colleagues further noted that the knighthood of the Grail mentioned in the songs is none other than that of the Knights Templar, about whom much has already been written. Their belief is borne out by the fact that the Templars seemed obsessed with recovering a holy relic which was variously known as the “Stone of Wisdom” or the “Talking Stone” — could this have been the Baton of Command?

In 1934, a mystic named Orfelio Ulises, who had just returned to Argentina after having spent eight years in Tibet as an adept of lamaism, came across upon the mysterious Baton of Command, allegedly “guided” by the mental powers of his Tibetan masters, and dug the object out of the slopes of Mount Uritorco in Capilla del Monte. While all of this smacks of Madame Blavatsky in all her glory, other more credible events would also come to pass.

Much like Spielberg’s Indiana Jones, Ulises would come to realize that other parties were interested in his discovery: The Nazi Ahnenerbe (“Ancestral Heritage Society”), founded by Heinrich Himmler in 1935 with the aim of supporting the theories put forth by the notorious Thule Society, had already secured paranormal objects like the Spear of Longinus–also known as the Spear of Destiny–in 1938, and a year earlier had started to send out worldwide expeditions in search of Noah’s Ark, Atlantis, and bizarre medicines used by South American natives. It was only a matter of time before these twisted forces had fixed their predatory gaze on the Baton of Command. To their aid came then-colonel Juan Domingo Perón–Argentina’s future dictator. Perón spent the late 1930’s as a military observer in Italy and Germany and was also fascinated by the occult.

Orfelio Ulises and a number of “hermetic scholars” managed to conceal the periapt from the Nazis and keep in Argentina, where it remained under Ulises’ care until his death, and then passed on to Professor Guillermo Terrera in 1948. It is currently in the custody of Dr. Fernando Fluguerto Martí and his Delphos Group.

Also in 1948, Baron Georg Von Hauenschild, an archaeologist and Grail scholar, prepared an exhaustive report on the Baton of Command for the Institute of Archaeology, Linguistics and Folklore of the University of Cordoba, showing that the object’s estimated age was indeed 8000 years and of clearly neolithic manufacture. Great care was taken by prehistoric craftsmen in polishing the object, rounding off its base and tapering its head into a soft conical shape. The volcanic basalt that it is made of gives it a metallic look, and when struck, the Baton of Command makes a ringing sound. Subsequent electromagnetic and spectroscopic analyses proved that the Baton emits an electromagnetic field students of the occult have construed this to mean that a properly trained adept, under the right conditions, might be able to establish a paraphysical link to other realities or unlock the wand’s secrets.

This is where the Baton of Command’s powers apparently lie: it was designed, according to Professor Terrera, as a means of regenerating humanity and patiently awaits the right person to come and make use of it. As of this writing, that person has apparently not come.

Author Luis Alberto Vence makes the following curious note. According to historical sources and the beliefs of contemporary smiths and armorers, the mythical blade Excalibur would have measured approximately 1.10 meters — the exact length of the Simihuinqui or Baton of Command.

Metaphysical claptrap or occult truth? You be the judge. In his book E l Valle de los Espíritus (Buenos Aires, Kier, 1989) Terrera sums up the situation thus: “We must bear in mind that all that science has discovered up until yesterday as an absolute truth could be corrected either today or tomorrow, since all human knowledge is subject to change, as part of the dynamic process that accompanies it.”

Rings of Power and Other Finery

In 1997, moviegoers were treated to John Cameron’s Titanic and its subplot concerning an intriguing blue diamond. Jewels such as the one shown in the film have often been ascribed remarkable talismanic powers, and in other cases, qualities that make them lethal to the user, much like the One Ring in J.R.R. Tolkien’s saga.

Not many of these items have survived down to our time, but we know that Alexander the Great was particularly fond of an unusual opal which kept him from being wounded in battle. Upon embarking on his conquest of the Persian Empire, the Macedonian king (whose own armor would become talismanic over the centuries, as mentioned earlier) made a quick stop at the ruins of Troy to secure a sacred shield, which had belonged to one of the heroes of Homeric legend, in an effort to bolster his invulnerability an extra notch. But neither the exotic opal nor the ancient shield were much help when an arrow pierced Alexander’s lungs while storming the walls of a city in the Punjab.

Rings occupy a privileged position among all articles of jewelry: Apollonius of Tyana received a ring of amber from one of the initiates in the fabled city of Iarchas somewhere in Central Asia (or another dimension?). The amber stone allegedly kept its wearer from harm and enabled him or her to have foreknowledge of any dangers ahead–a faculty that the legendary Apollonius employed more than once. Charlemagne possessed an unusual ring whose stone was supposed to preserve all of a warlord’s conquests. Naturally, this amulet quickly taken by the Frankish monarch’s son Lewis and in turn squabbled over by Charlemagne’s nephews, who divided up their grandfather’s empire.

But the powers ascribed to these adornments mainly reflect the wishes of the human wearer rather than any true supernatural powers. However, what are we to make of the ring worn by Charles XII of Sweden? This Scandinavian monarch ruled an empire built around the Baltic Sea and was one of Russia’s most implacable foes. Author Brad Steiger notes in his book Atlantis Rising (Dell, 1976) that the Swedish king’s rise to power had apparently been aided an abetted by his dealings with a “little grey man” who had given him a ring that would vanish on the day of Charles’ death. The monarch appears to have gladly accepted this gift and embarked on his military career. In the heat of battle, shortly after one of his officers noted that the ring had vanished from his fingers, the monarch received a mortal wound.

Emeralds held a particular fascination for the infamous Emperor Nero, according to the historian Pliny, who wrote that the lyre-strumming despot owned a flat, nameless specimen imbued with supernatural powers, which he even used as a magnifying glass. While antiquity was fascinated by colored stones like sapphires and rubies, diamonds acquired importance in more recent centuries–some of them having names and histories as bizarre as any fictional object, and the Hope, Star of India and Kolhinoor diamonds have been featured on silver screen.

The Regent diamond is one of the more fascinating ones. A slave in an Indian mine found the precious stone sometime during the 1600’s and escaped bondage, only to be slain by a sailor to whom he had shown the diamond. The sailor took the stone to France, where he died a suicide. The Regent changed hands from one French aristocrat to the next, bringing misfortune to all of them. Napoleon Bonaparte had the Regent embedded in the pommel of his sword, which he later surrendered upon being exiled to Elba in 1814.

The Emerald Tablet of Hermes Thrice Great

God or human wizard? All books of esoteric lore speak reverently of Hermes Trismegistus or Hermes Thrice Great and his coveted “Emerald Tablet”. Worshipped by the Greek residents of the Egyptian city of Alexandria, and identified with the ancient deity Thoth, the scribe of the underworld, Hermes Trismegistus was believed to have been a human monarch who ruled for three thousand years and wrote an amazing thirty-five thousand books — a useful way of filling up three millennia. Yet only fragments of this mythic figure’s writings have been handed down from hoary antiquity, ironically through the works of Christian authors.

Although some modern scholars agree that Hermes Thrice Great was in fact the title given to the proto-chemist in charge of refining gold–a seemingly “magical” process to the ancients–medieval alchemists and thinkers considered Trismegistus to have handed down secrets preserved by the aptly-named “hermetic” schools of knowledge.

The most significant of these works was a document referred to as the Emerald Tablet, which was supposedly buried along with Trismegistus’s mummy under the Great Pyramid of Gizeh. The Tablet allegedly reveals the secrets of alchemy. Although the Hermes Thrice Great’s mummy still waits patiently for archaeologists to find it (although the “Tomb of Osiris” discovered in 1998 does offer fascinating possibilities), part of the Emerald Tablet’s metallurgical secrets can be found in the Leyden Papyrus–brought back to Europe in the 1820’s by Johann d’Anastasi–which escaped the destruction of alchemical texts mandated by the Emperor Diocletian in 298 A.D..

Based on this historical assessment, one could hardly consider the Emerald Table a holy relic…unless the theories of Argentinean author Fabio Zerpa are taken into consideration.

Zerpa, better known for his work in ufology, cites the Count de Gebélin’s belief that the Emerald Tablet is merely another name for the legendary Book of Thoth — a forbidden book some ten thousand years old which would have been the basis of Egyptian civilization and occultism, as well as the key to “mastering the secrets of the air, the sea, the earth and the heavenly bodies”. In Primitive World, his treatise on Egypt, de Gebélin remarks that the Book of Thoth survived destruction because it was cleverly disguised as a game, as we shall see below.

An Egyptian priest, Nefer-Ka-Ptah, retrieved the book, which had been sealed in a series of nested sarcophagi and kept in the bottom of Nile. Upon studying it, the priest was able to learn the art of numerology, communication with entities living across space and time, clairvoyance, and the art of building “magic mirrors” which do not reflect the viewer’s countenance, but rather other worlds inhabited by loathsome beings.

Nefer-Ka-Ptah died a suicide, according to the story, and the Book of Thoth was spirited out of Egypt. Its magical powers and hidden knowledge would spread around the world in the form of the Minor and Major Arcana of the Tarot, which first appeared around 1200 A.D. in Italy as carticellas (“little cards”) and were banned in 1240 and 1329 by bishops across Europe as malign. In his book The Black Art (Paperback Library, 1968) Rollo Ahmed, notes that the High Priestess card represents the Egyptian goddess Isis–perhaps the most tangible link to its Egyptian origin.

So, if Zerpa is right, the Tarot deck in your drawer could harken back to mythological times, placing it among the oldest relics known to mankind.

Magic Mirrors and Scrying Stones

Mathematician, astrologer, alchemist, spy, close advisor to queens and emperors: these are the impressive credentials of Dr. John Dee, one of the 16th century’s most influential personages. Although he is best remembered for his work in the esoteric arts, mainly the development of the Enochian language employed in magical rituals, it is possible to find endless references to Dee’s importance as political and scientific figure without a single mention of the aspects which have made him a household name in occult circles.

John Dee’s achievements in esoterica–alleged communication with an order of angelic beings–were achieved through the technique known as “scrying”, looking into mirrors or similar reflective surfaces such as bowls filled with water, mercury or oil, in order to have clairvoyant experiences. Dr. Dee himself lacked this ability, and depended on his assistant Edward Kelley to do the viewing (a technique very similar to a modern-day Remote Viewer and his handler). The techniques involved in the process of speaking to otherworldly entities are contained in Dee’s Libri Mysteriorum.

The reflective surfaces employed in the scrying were a globe of rock crystal–a precursor of the “crystal ball”–and a flat surface which Dee referred to as his “jet shewstone”. These items are important relics of the paranormal tradition and survive to this very day, currently displayed in the British Museum.

Where Dr. Dee acquired his objects of power is a mystery. Nevertheless, there has been the suggestion–posited by paranormal researcher and playwright Eugenia Macer-Story–that the good doctor may have obtained them, by means of the activities of English “seadogs” raiding Spanish galleons, from the place they were most available at the time: Aztec Mexico, only recently conquered by Spain.The Aztec priesthood had fashioned a great many magic mirrors out of obsidian, and some of them are in museums, like the legendary black mirror of the evil deity Tezcatlipoca, on display in the Mexico City’s Instituto Nacional de Antropología.

There exist other objects allegedly employed for the purpose of communication with other levels of existence. One of them leads us into a discussion of the ever-controversial Knights Templar, the monastic order of warriors whose activities had a major impact on Europe and the Mediterranean Basin during almost two centuries. The Templars are perhaps better known for their activities during the Crusades and the tragic end of their order at the hands of the kings of France, but a number of scholars have focussed on the occult aspects of their work. George Andrews cites French paranormalist Guy Tarade’s research into a document dating back to the year 1310, which contains the “transcript” of the torture of knight Templar by Church authorities. The tormented warrior-monk speaks of time travel, fiery chariots, wells of darkness in the heavens and realms of existence around unknown stars. Logically, this can be dismissed as pain-induced delirium, but the transcript hints at these things being seen through a “chest made of an unknown metal” tentatively identified with the Ark of the Covenant.

Here we take another flying leap into speculation: aside from all the powers ascribed to it over the millennia, could the Ark have been a means of seeing into other places and times? Andrews suggests that the “well of darkness in the heavens” is an unspecialized description of the astronomical phenomenon our scientists term a Black Hole–something utterly unknown in the 14th century.

Mysterium Tremendum: The Ark of the Covenant

It is with some trepidation that any writer approaches the subject of the Ark, since theories about its nature branch out like the leaves of a tree into unsuspected directions, making a cursory examination nearly impossible. In the limited space available to us here, we shall try to examine some of the most provocative thoughts on this, the most spoken-of relic that is out of our hands.

Viewers of Steven Spielberg’s Raiders of the Lost Ark already know the basics: the Ark was a transportable device given by Yahweh to the ancient Israelites as a means of communication and occasionally as a weapon. The holy object was stored in the Temple of Jerusalem where presumably only members of the priesthood had access to it, and was kept safe from capture during the various invasions of Palestine by foreign powers (Egyptians, Assyrians and Hellenic Syrians). Although the Emperor Titus successfully conquered Jerusalem in 70 A.D., his triumphal arch in Rome, which shows Roman legionaries on parade with their captured booty from the temple (the Menorah, sacred trumpets and tables), does not include the Ark–a sculptor’s oversight, perhaps? These objects remained in Rome until the city was sacked by the marauding Vandals in the 5th century and taken to their capital, Carthage. The Byzantine armies of Belisarius shipped the objects to Constantinople after the conquest of the Vandal kingdom, but the superstitious emperor Justinian, fearing that the captured “treasure of the Jews” would spell the ruin of Constantinople, had it objects sent to Jerusalem in 555 A.D.

Modern writers of occult history suggest that the Knights Templar discovered the Ark in the ruins of Solomon’s temple and took custody of it, eventually shipping it back to Europe. A number of hiding places have been suggested for it:one of them is Rennes le Chateau in France, certain European forests and even remote Abyssinia. Some authors have raised the possibility that before reaching its ultimate resting place, the Ark may have been guarded in a very unusual location: the fortress known as Castel del Monte, located in the “heel” of the boot-shaped Italian peninsula.

Castel del Monte was built in 1240 A.D. at the command of the Frederick II, holder of an impressive number of titles, including Holy Roman Emperor and King of Jerusalem. A patron and ally of the Knights Templar, the emperor decreed that his strange, octagonal castle be built to precise measurements having magical significance and enclosing a main hall known, suggestively, as the Master’s Chamber. The late Robert Charroux suggested that Castel del Monte was meant to be “a castle of Templar alchemists, governed by the figure 8, which when written horizontally, is the symbol of infinity and universal domination.” (Charroux, Legacy of the Gods, NY: Berkeley, 1974).

Lacking all the typical inner structures of a castle, such as armories, refectories and living quarters, this octagonal fortress was not meant to repel invaders or serve as a garrison. In the light of all of its mystical associations, could we not speculate that this, in fact, was the special place built to receive the ultimate relic–the Ark of the Covenant? Under the protection of the powerful German emperor and the Knights Templar, it is hard to conceive of a safer location, or as Charroux points out, a more symbolic one, since Castel del Monte is located halfway from the greatest points of pilgrimage in the Mediterranean world: Santiago de Compostela in the west and Jerusalem in the east.

Objects of such mystical prowess often conferred legitimacy upon the wearer: the crown of Constantine hung in full view above the altar of Constantinople’s Hagia Sophia church, from where it was taken many times by anyone inclined to make a bid for the Byzantine throne. The successful coup-de-etat was seen as a sign of divine favor and the crown returned to its proper place.

Humanity has certainly shown a flair for imbuing physical objects with unsuspected magical or supernatural powers, but can we casually dismiss their existence as flights of fancy? Certainly some of them existed, and some of them have astonishing stories to tell.


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The Life of Medieval Knights (Collection)

  • In the Middle Ages, knights were at the top of the social ladder
  • With the best training, the best clothes, the best weapons and, supposedly, the best manners, they were what everyone else aspired to be
  • Tales of daring deeds and chivalry were told in poems and popular songs so that lasting fame awaited those knights who rose above their peers.

Daily Life of a Knight in the Middle Ages

  • Daily Life of a Knight in the Middle Ages The daily life of a knight in the Middle ages followed a similar schedule to that of his lord or the noble he served
  • The Daily life of a Knight during the Middle ages centred around castles or Manors or fighting for his lord and the King during times of war.

A Knight's Daily Life In The Middle Ages

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  • Many have imagined going back in time and becoming a real medieval knight or lady
  • Life for knights is assumed to have been brimming with jousting, courting, and slaying dragons
  • However, most of this isn't true
  • Jousting took some time to become popular, chivalry was a list of rules about whom not to abuse, and dragons didn't exist.

A Day in the Life of a Medieval Times’ Knight Myrtle

A Day in the Life of a Medieval Times’ Knight Knight Zach Walker prepares for the show’s opening sequence, when he and other knights and nobility are first introduced to the cheering crowd.

What did a knight do in the medieval times

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  • Originally knights were attendants or specialized foot-soldiers, but the status of knights was elevated around 800 A.D
  • Likewise, what was it like to be a knight in medieval times? The Daily life of a Knight during the Middle ages centred around castles or Manors or fighting for his lord and the King during times

Middle Ages for Kids: Becoming a Medieval Knight

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  • History >> Middle Ages for Kids
  • There were two ways that a man could become a knight during the Middle Ages
  • The first was earning the right on the battlefield
  • If a soldier fought particularly bravely during a battle or war, he may be awarded knighthood by the king, a lord, or even another knight.

Random Deaitls About Life of A Knight During Medieval

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  • Knight originally refers to the cavalry who received formal military training in the Middle Ages in Europe, and later became a social class
  • The identity of the knight is often not inherited
  • In the Middle Ages, the knight served in the army of the lord and obtained a fief
  • Both kings and nobles need soldiers who have an overwhelming advantage in war.

What was It Actually Like to Be a Knight in Medieval Times

There are a variety of myths about what it was like to be a knight during medieval times, not just spread by Hollywood, but even by the contemporary legends during medieval times themselves- in both featuring widespread depictions of the chivalric knight rushing to the aid of damsels in distress and generally spending their time being bastions of all that is good and the very definition …

Medieval Times: What's It Like to Be a Knight

  • Medieval Times: A Day in the Life of a Knight
  • "Dragon slaying" might be an odd skill to list on a résumé, but Robert Idrizi—a knight at Medieval Times Dinner and Tournament—knows that you can never be too prepared
  • When we first met Idrizi, he was dressed in his average work clothes: a full suit of medieval armor with a streak of black

Middle Ages Knights: Medieval Times Medieval Times

  • Knights were medieval gentleman-soldiers, usually high-born, raised by a sovereign to privileged military status after training as a page and squire
  • Originally knights were attendants or specialized foot-soldiers, but the status of knights was elevated around 800 A.D.

A Day in the Life of an Early Medieval Knight

  • A Day in the Life of an Early Medieval Knight
  • The image of the chivalrous, medieval knight in shining plate armor with he and his horse outfitted in heraldic symbols is typically what many envision when they think of knights throughout history
  • But that ideal evolved from the 13th to 15th centuries, after such warriors had

Medieval Occupations and Jobs: Knight. The training to

  • Medieval Knight Medieval knights had to go through years of training in the use of weapons, horsemanship, and warfare
  • Frequently, members of the noble class, knights were responsible for defending their feudal lord’s territory from rivals and keeping the local serfdom in line with the lord’s rule.

6 reasons why being a medieval knight would have sucked

  • Between the tall tales of heroic deeds and depictions of gleaming, glorious suits of armor, the life of a knight has been made into something grander than it actually was
  • The desire to take up sword and shield and live the life of a knight immediately goes out the window once you learn a little more about what that life was actually like.

The Life & Times of the Medieval Knight: A Vivid

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  • The Life & Times of the Medieval Knight: A Vivid Exploration Of The Origins, Rise And Fall Of The Noble Order Of Knighthood, Illustrated With Over 220 Fine Art Paintings And Photographs [Phillips, Charles] on Amazon.com
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  • The Life & Times of the Medieval Knight: A Vivid Exploration Of The Origins, Rise And Fall Of The Noble Order Of Knighthood

Knight History, Orders, & Facts Britannica

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  • The first medieval knights were professional cavalry warriors, some of whom were vassals holding lands as fiefs from the lords in whose armies they served, while others were not enfeoffed with land
  • (See also knight service.) The process of entering knighthood often became formalized.

The Daily Life of Knights During The Middle Ages: ages

  • The knights almost never had a family, now that they were at war, but they did show admiration regardless of their martial state
  • Combined with the "Code Of Chilvary" ladies often gave tokens to knights
  • Knights in medieval times were threatened by poor hygiene, broken bones, wounds, abcesses, and

Medieval Times: A Day in the Life of a Knight

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Medieval Times: A Day in the Life of a Knight BY: Stephanie McDaniel | Aug 6, 2018 "Dragon slaying" might be an odd skill to list on a résumé, but Robert Idrizi—a knight at Medieval Times Dinner and Tournament—knows that you can never be too prepared.

What was Life Like for a Medieval Knight

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My book about the Crusades:http://www.amazon.com/Why-Does-Heathen-Rage-Crusades/dp/152395762X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1461105827&sr=8-1&keywords=why+does+the+

What It Was Like to be a Knight During Medieval Times

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When we think of knights during the medieval times, we think of valiant men who chose to defend their honor in feats of jousting, chivalry, and dragon slayin

Medieval times from a knight’s perspective

  • Medieval times from a knight’s perspective
  • There were several barriers that medieval warriors had to overcome that were not closely related to battles and fights
  • Middle Ages are considered to start from the fall of the Western Roman Empire (476) until the discovery of America (1492)
  • However, the heroic age of knights began in the 10th

A look at the life of a knight at Medieval Times WGN

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As part of WGN’s ‘Your Hometown’ celebration of Schaumburg, Edward Maciejczyk -Head Knight at Medieval Times in Scottsdale- joins Steve Bertrand on Chicago’s Afternoon News to talk about getting his start in Schaumburg, what the training and life of a knight are like, and to talk about the preparations being made to reopen safely when the state deems it safe.


Inexplicata-The Journal of Hispanic Ufology

Few people outside of South America have ever heard of this most mysterious and controversial emblem of power, which according to some sources, may be the ultimate source of mysteries.

Tradition holds that the Baton of Command (a direct translation of its Spanish name, Bastón de Mando, which in turn translates as Simihuinqui -- the name given to it by the South American tribesmen) was crafted some eight thousand years ago by Multán (also known as Voltán), a mighty chieftain of the Comechingones tribe, from a piece of black basalt. The occult powers of this ancient artifact were legendary among the tribes of the modern Argentinean Chaco and the Bolivian lowlands, and in the 1830's, an Araucanian warlord named Calfucurá--well steeped in his people's traditions--led a massive search for the object in the mountain ranges of Tandil, Balrcarce, San Luis and Córdoba which did not turn up the Baton of Command.

It is at this point that we must delve into the other esoteric tradition linked to this black basalt wand: students of the occult believe that aside from its neolithic age, the Baton of Command is tied in to the European tradition of the Holy Grail, which has been handed down to us through Arthurian legend and Wagnerian opera and is far removed from fiction.

These esoterics, like the late Argentinean scholar Guillermo Terrera, believe that the 12th century chansons de geste of Chretien de Troyes and Wolfram Von Eschenbach make allusions to the Baton of Command and to the existence of South America--a landmass whose existence Medieval man could not have suspected.

While these allegations would quite rightly be dismissed as crankery in the hallowed halls of academe, Terrera and his followers nevertheless make an intriguing case for their beliefs. According to these esoteric revisionists, mythological sources in Central and Eastern Asia make reference to a mysterious character entrusted with the custody of two sacred items: one of them the so-called Holy Grail o Sangraal, and the other being "the Stone of Wisdom", which they identify as the Baton of Command.

The enigmatic custodian of these items would have begun his career thousands of years ago, and is only known as the "Man from Persia" -- the Parsifal of Eschenbach's songs, and the Sir Perceval of the Arthurian Cycle. According to the German minstrel's epic, the enigmatic Parsifal travelled to the land of Argentum (". the secret gates of a silent land named Argentum and will always be. ") to lay the objects under his care in the sacred hill known as Vlarava. Extrapolating from the epic poem, these esotericists have identified Argentum with Argentina and the sacred mount Vlarava with Mount Uritorco in the country's northern reaches.

Putting aside their reliance on late Medieval epic for a moment, Terrera and his colleagues further noted that the knighthood of the Grail mentioned in the songs is none other than that of the Knights Templar, about whom much has already been written. Their belief is borne out by the fact that the Templars seemed obsessed with recovering a holy relic which was variously known as the "Stone of Wisdom" or the "Talking Stone" -- could this have been the Baton of Command?

In 1934, a mystic named Orfelio Ulises, who had just returned to Argentina after having spent eight years in Tibet as an adept of lamaism, came across upon the mysterious Baton of Command, allegedly "guided" by the mental powers of his Tibetan masters, and dug the object out of the slopes of Mount Uritorco in Capilla del Monte. While all of this smacks of Madame Blavatsky in all her glory, other more credible events would also come to pass.

Much like Spielberg's Indiana Jones, Ulises would come to realize that other parties were interested in his discovery: The Nazi Ahnenerbe ("Ancestral Heritage Society"), founded by Heinrich Himmler in 1935 with the aim of supporting the theories put forth by the notorious Thule Society, had already secured paranormal objects like the Spear of Longinus--also known as the Spear of Destiny--in 1938, and a year earlier had started to send out worldwide expeditions in search of Noah's Ark, Atlantis, and bizarre medicines used by South American natives. It was only a matter of time before these twisted forces had fixed their predatory gaze on the Baton of Command. To their aid came then-colonel Juan Domingo Perón--Argentina's future dictator. Perón spent the late 1930's as a military observer in Italy and Germany and was also fascinated by the occult.

Orfelio Ulises and a number of "hermetic scholars" managed to conceal the periapt from the Nazis and keep in Argentina, where it remained under Ulises' care until his death, and then passed on to Professor Guillermo Terrera in 1948. It is currently in the custody of Dr. Fernando Fluguerto Martí and his Delphos Group.

Also in 1948, Baron Georg Von Hauenschild, an archaeologist and Grail scholar, prepared an exhaustive report on the Baton of Command for the Institute of Archaeology, Linguistics and Folklore of the University of Cordoba, showing that the object's estimated age was indeed 8000 years and of clearly neolithic manufacture. Great care was taken by prehistoric craftsmen in polishing the object, rounding off its base and tapering its head into a soft conical shape. The volcanic basalt that it is made of gives it a metallic look, and when struck, the Baton of Command makes a ringing sound. Subsequent electromagnetic and spectroscopic analyses proved that the Baton emits an electromagnetic field students of the occult have construed this to mean that a properly trained adept, under the right conditions, might be able to establish a paraphysical link to other realities or unlock the wand's secrets.

This is where the Baton of Command's powers apparently lie: it was designed, according to Professor Terrera, as a means of regenerating humanity and patiently awaits the right person to come and make use of it. As of this writing, that person has apparently not come.

Author Luis Alberto Vence makes the following curious note. According to historical sources and the beliefs of contemporary smiths and armorers, the mythical blade Excalibur would have measured approximately 1.10 meters -- the exact length of the Simihuinqui or Baton of Command.

Metaphysical claptrap or occult truth? You be the judge. In his book E l Valle de los Espíritus (Buenos Aires, Kier, 1989) Terrera sums up the situation thus: "We must bear in mind that all that science has discovered up until yesterday as an absolute truth could be corrected either today or tomorrow, since all human knowledge is subject to change, as part of the dynamic process that accompanies it."


Rings of Power and Other Finery

In 1997, moviegoers were treated to John Cameron's Titanic and its subplot concerning an intriguing blue diamond. Jewels such as the one shown in the film have often been ascribed remarkable talismanic powers, and in other cases, qualities that make them lethal to the user, much like the One Ring in J.R.R. Tolkien's saga.

Not many of these items have survived down to our time, but we know that Alexander the Great was particularly fond of an unusual opal which kept him from being wounded in battle. Upon embarking on his conquest of the Persian Empire, the Macedonian king (whose own armor would become talismanic over the centuries, as mentioned earlier) made a quick stop at the ruins of Troy to secure a sacred shield, which had belonged to one of the heroes of Homeric legend, in an effort to bolster his invulnerability an extra notch. But neither the exotic opal nor the ancient shield were much help when an arrow pierced Alexander's lungs while storming the walls of a city in the Punjab.

Rings occupy a privileged position among all articles of jewelry: Apollonius of Tyana received a ring of amber from one of the initiates in the fabled city of Iarchas somewhere in Central Asia (or another dimension?). The amber stone allegedly kept its wearer from harm and enabled him or her to have foreknowledge of any dangers ahead--a faculty that the legendary Apollonius employed more than once. Charlemagne possessed an unusual ring whose stone was supposed to preserve all of a warlord's conquests. Naturally, this amulet quickly taken by the Frankish monarch's son Lewis and in turn squabbled over by Charlemagne's nephews, who divided up their grandfather's empire.

But the powers ascribed to these adornments mainly reflect the wishes of the human wearer rather than any true supernatural powers. However, what are we to make of the ring worn by Charles XII of Sweden? This Scandinavian monarch ruled an empire built around the Baltic Sea and was one of Russia's most implacable foes. Author Brad Steiger notes in his book Atlantis Rising (Dell, 1976) that the Swedish king's rise to power had apparently been aided an abetted by his dealings with a "little grey man" who had given him a ring that would vanish on the day of Charles' death. The monarch appears to have gladly accepted this gift and embarked on his military career. In the heat of battle, shortly after one of his officers noted that the ring had vanished from his fingers, the monarch received a mortal wound.

Emeralds held a particular fascination for the infamous Emperor Nero, according to the historian Pliny, who wrote that the lyre-strumming despot owned a flat, nameless specimen imbued with supernatural powers, which he even used as a magnifying glass. While antiquity was fascinated by colored stones like sapphires and rubies, diamonds acquired importance in more recent centuries--some of them having names and histories as bizarre as any fictional object, and the Hope, Star of India and Kolhinoor diamonds have been featured on silver screen.

The Regent diamond is one of the more fascinating ones. A slave in an Indian mine found the precious stone sometime during the 1600's and escaped bondage, only to be slain by a sailor to whom he had shown the diamond. The sailor took the stone to France, where he died a suicide. The Regent changed hands from one French aristocrat to the next, bringing misfortune to all of them. Napoleon Bonaparte had the Regent embedded in the pommel of his sword, which he later surrendered upon being exiled to Elba in 1814.

The Emerald Tablet of Hermes Thrice Great

God or human wizard? All books of esoteric lore speak reverently of Hermes Trismegistus or Hermes Thrice Great and his coveted "Emerald Tablet". Worshipped by the Greek residents of the Egyptian city of Alexandria, and identified with the ancient deity Thoth, the scribe of the underworld, Hermes Trismegistus was believed to have been a human monarch who ruled for three thousand years and wrote an amazing thirty-five thousand books -- a useful way of filling up three millennia. Yet only fragments of this mythic figure's writings have been handed down from hoary antiquity, ironically through the works of Christian authors.

Although some modern scholars agree that Hermes Thrice Great was in fact the title given to the proto-chemist in charge of refining gold--a seemingly "magical" process to the ancients--medieval alchemists and thinkers considered Trismegistus to have handed down secrets preserved by the aptly-named "hermetic" schools of knowledge.

The most significant of these works was a document referred to as the Emerald Tablet, which was supposedly buried along with Trismegistus's mummy under the Great Pyramid of Gizeh. The Tablet allegedly reveals the secrets of alchemy. Although the Hermes Thrice Great's mummy still waits patiently for archaeologists to find it (although the "Tomb of Osiris" discovered in 1998 does offer fascinating possibilities), part of the Emerald Tablet's metallurgical secrets can be found in the Leyden Papyrus--brought back to Europe in the 1820's by Johann d'Anastasi--which escaped the destruction of alchemical texts mandated by the Emperor Diocletian in 298 A.D..
Based on this historical assessment, one could hardly consider the Emerald Table a holy relic. unless the theories of Argentinean author Fabio Zerpa are taken into consideration.

Zerpa, better known for his work in ufology, cites the Count de Gebélin's belief that the Emerald Tablet is merely another name for the legendary Book of Thoth -- a forbidden book some ten thousand years old which would have been the basis of Egyptian civilization and occultism, as well as the key to "mastering the secrets of the air, the sea, the earth and the heavenly bodies". In Primitive World, his treatise on Egypt, de Gebélin remarks that the Book of Thoth survived destruction because it was cleverly disguised as a game, as we shall see below.

An Egyptian priest, Nefer-Ka-Ptah, retrieved the book, which had been sealed in a series of nested sarcophagi and kept in the bottom of Nile. Upon studying it, the priest was able to learn the art of numerology, communication with entities living across space and time, clairvoyance, and the art of building "magic mirrors" which do not reflect the viewer's countenance, but rather other worlds inhabited by loathsome beings.

Nefer-Ka-Ptah died a suicide, according to the story, and the Book of Thoth was spirited out of Egypt. Its magical powers and hidden knowledge would spread around the world in the form of the Minor and Major Arcana of the Tarot, which first appeared around 1200 A.D. in Italy as carticellas ("little cards") and were banned in 1240 and 1329 by bishops across Europe as malign. In his book The Black Art (Paperback Library, 1968) Rollo Ahmed, notes that the High Priestess card represents the Egyptian goddess Isis--perhaps the most tangible link to its Egyptian origin.

So, if Zerpa is right, the Tarot deck in your drawer could harken back to mythological times, placing it among the oldest relics known to mankind.

Magic Mirrors and Scrying Stones

Mathematician, astrologer, alchemist, spy, close advisor to queens and emperors: these are the impressive credentials of Dr. John Dee, one of the 16th century's most influential personages. Although he is best remembered for his work in the esoteric arts, mainly the development of the Enochian language employed in magical rituals, it is possible to find endless references to Dee's importance as political and scientific figure without a single mention of the aspects which have made him a household name in occult circles.

John Dee's achievements in esoterica--alleged communication with an order of angelic beings--were achieved through the technique known as "scrying", looking into mirrors or similar reflective surfaces such as bowls filled with water, mercury or oil, in order to have clairvoyant experiences. Dr. Dee himself lacked this ability, and depended on his assistant Edward Kelley to do the viewing (a technique very similar to a modern-day Remote Viewer and his handler). The techniques involved in the process of speaking to otherworldly entities are contained in Dee's Libri Mysteriorum.

The reflective surfaces employed in the scrying were a globe of rock crystal--a precursor of the "crystal ball"--and a flat surface which Dee referred to as his "jet shewstone". These items are important relics of the paranormal tradition and survive to this very day, currently displayed in the British Museum.

Where Dr. Dee acquired his objects of power is a mystery. Nevertheless, there has been the suggestion--posited by paranormal researcher and playwright Eugenia Macer-Story--that the good doctor may have obtained them, by means of the activities of English "seadogs" raiding Spanish galleons, from the place they were most available at the time: Aztec Mexico, only recently conquered by Spain.The Aztec priesthood had fashioned a great many magic mirrors out of obsidian, and some of them are in museums, like the legendary black mirror of the evil deity Tezcatlipoca, on display in the Mexico City's Instituto Nacional de Antropología.

There exist other objects allegedly employed for the purpose of communication with other levels of existence. One of them leads us into a discussion of the ever-controversial Knights Templar, the monastic order of warriors whose activities had a major impact on Europe and the Mediterranean Basin during almost two centuries. The Templars are perhaps better known for their activities during the Crusades and the tragic end of their order at the hands of the kings of France, but a number of scholars have focussed on the occult aspects of their work. George Andrews cites French paranormalist Guy Tarade's research into a document dating back to the year 1310, which contains the "transcript" of the torture of knight Templar by Church authorities. The tormented warrior-monk speaks of time travel, fiery chariots, wells of darkness in the heavens and realms of existence around unknown stars. Logically, this can be dismissed as pain-induced delirium, but the transcript hints at these things being seen through a "chest made of an unknown metal" tentatively identified with the Ark of the Covenant.

Here we take another flying leap into speculation: aside from all the powers ascribed to it over the millennia, could the Ark have been a means of seeing into other places and times? Andrews suggests that the "well of darkness in the heavens" is an unspecialized description of the astronomical phenomenon our scientists term a Black Hole--something utterly unknown in the 14th century.

Mysterium Tremendum: The Ark of the Covenant

It is with some trepidation that any writer approaches the subject of the Ark, since theories about its nature branch out like the leaves of a tree into unsuspected directions, making a cursory examination nearly impossible. In the limited space available to us here, we shall try to examine some of the most provocative thoughts on this, the most spoken-of relic that is out of our hands.

Viewers of Steven Spielberg's Raiders of the Lost Ark already know the basics: the Ark was a transportable device given by Yahweh to the ancient Israelites as a means of communication and occasionally as a weapon. The holy object was stored in the Temple of Jerusalem where presumably only members of the priesthood had access to it, and was kept safe from capture during the various invasions of Palestine by foreign powers (Egyptians, Assyrians and Hellenic Syrians). Although the Emperor Titus successfully conquered Jerusalem in 70 A.D., his triumphal arch in Rome, which shows Roman legionaries on parade with their captured booty from the temple (the Menorah, sacred trumpets and tables), does not include the Ark--a sculptor's oversight, perhaps? These objects remained in Rome until the city was sacked by the marauding Vandals in the 5th century and taken to their capital, Carthage. The Byzantine armies of Belisarius shipped the objects to Constantinople after the conquest of the Vandal kingdom, but the superstitious emperor Justinian, fearing that the captured "treasure of the Jews" would spell the ruin of Constantinople, had it objects sent to Jerusalem in 555 A.D.

Modern writers of occult history suggest that the Knights Templar discovered the Ark in the ruins of Solomon's temple and took custody of it, eventually shipping it back to Europe. A number of hiding places have been suggested for it:one of them is Rennes le Chateau in France, certain European forests and even remote Abyssinia. Some authors have raised the possibility that before reaching its ultimate resting place, the Ark may have been guarded in a very unusual location: the fortress known as Castel del Monte, located in the "heel" of the boot-shaped Italian peninsula.

Castel del Monte was built in 1240 A.D. at the command of the Frederick II, holder of an impressive number of titles, including Holy Roman Emperor and King of Jerusalem. A patron and ally of the Knights Templar, the emperor decreed that his strange, octagonal castle be built to precise measurements having magical significance and enclosing a main hall known, suggestively, as the Master's Chamber. The late Robert Charroux suggested that Castel del Monte was meant to be "a castle of Templar alchemists, governed by the figure 8, which when written horizontally, is the symbol of infinity and universal domination." (Charroux, Legacy of the Gods, NY: Berkeley, 1974).

Lacking all the typical inner structures of a castle, such as armories, refectories and living quarters, this octagonal fortress was not meant to repel invaders or serve as a garrison. In the light of all of its mystical associations, could we not speculate that this, in fact, was the special place built to receive the ultimate relic--the Ark of the Covenant? Under the protection of the powerful German emperor and the Knights Templar, it is hard to conceive of a safer location, or as Charroux points out, a more symbolic one, since Castel del Monte is located halfway from the greatest points of pilgrimage in the Mediterranean world: Santiago de Compostela in the west and Jerusalem in the east.

Objects of such mystical prowess often conferred legitimacy upon the wearer: the crown of Constantine hung in full view above the altar of Constantinople's Hagia Sophia church, from where it was taken many times by anyone inclined to make a bid for the Byzantine throne. The successful coup-de-etat was seen as a sign of divine favor and the crown returned to its proper place.

Humanity has certainly shown a flair for imbuing physical objects with unsuspected magical or supernatural powers, but can we casually dismiss their existence as flights of fancy? Certainly some of them existed, and some of them have astonishing stories to tell.


Watch the video: Knight Artorias VS Firelink Shrine (January 2022).