Information

Morris DD- 417 - History


Morris
(DD-417; dp. 1,570; 1. 348'2"; b. 36'1"; dr. 13'6"; sp. 35 k.; cpl. 192; a. 5 5'', 8 21'' tt. cl. Sims)

Morris ( DD-417) was laid down at the navy yard, Norfolk, Va., 7 June 1938; launched 1 June 1939; sponsored by Mrs. Charles R. Nutter, great-granddaughter of Commodore Charles Morris, and commissioned 5 March 10, Comdr. H. B. Jarrett in command.

Morris , flagship of DesRon 2, followed her shakedown with routine training schedules until the summer of 1941 ~when she joined the North Atlantic Patrol. With the entry of the United States into World War II, she entered the Charleston, N.C., Navy Yard, where she was equipped with the first fire control radar to be installed on a destroyer. By 3 January 1942 she was underway for Pearl Harbor, rejoining her squadron there at the end of February. Attached to TF 17, the destroyer sailed 16 March for Noumea, and into her first major enemy engagement, the Battle of Coral Sea. Prior to the battle, she guarded the carriers of the task force as their planes struck at enemy shipping in Tulagi Harbor and in the Lousiade Archipelago. During the 4-day battle, 4 to 8 May, she splashed one enemy plane and damaged two while screening Yorktown and Lexington and, when the latter was heavily damaged, pulled alongside to rescue some .500 survivors. Damage received during the rescue forced her back to Pearl Harbor where hurried repairs put her back into condition for the Battle of Midway a month later. In that action she again pulled alongside a sinking carrier, Yorktown, to rescue over 500 survivors.

Morris 's next action came in late August when she joined TF 81 in support of the Guadalcanal campaign. For the next 2 months she screened carriers and patrolled among the Solomons. On 25 October, following a 3-day independent sweep through the Gilberts, she rejoined TF 17 and took part in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands. During the action she destroyed six aircraft and once more came to the rescue of a sinking carrier, this time Hornet from which she took on 550 survivors. As in other rescue operations her superstructure was damaged, but, after repairs at Espiritu Santo, she was back in the Guadalcanal area, first operating with Enterprise and then as supply unit escort to the Ruseel.

In May 1943 Morris departed the southern Pacific and sailed north to support the capture and occupation of Attu and Kiska, the Aleutian end of the Japanese ribbon defense. Thence, after the Riska operation, she returned to San Francisco for a 7-week overhaul. In November she again joined an air support group escorting Lisoome Bay, Coral Sea, and Corregidor in the Gilbert Islands offensive, during which, for a fourth time, she went to aid a sinking carrier, Liscome Bag. As the task forces pressed further into the central Pacific, Morris sailed with them into the Marshalls. On 30 January 1944 she led a column of warships in a shore bombardment mission against Wotje. Thence she steamed to Kwajelein Atoll, where, while providing close fire support off Namur, she wiped out a Japanese counterattack force from an adjacent island. In mid-February she departed Kwajelein and moved with TG 51.11 to support the seizure and occupation of Eniwetok Arriving on the 17th, she continued carrier operations through the 24th when she sailed for Pearl Harbor.

DD-417 returned to combat in April 1944, when a~ a unit of the 7th Fleet she took part in all the western New Guinea landings, beginning with Hollandia. In May and June she give are support in the Toem-Wakde-Sarmi areas and then during the Biak Island operation. In July she went against enemy guns on Noemfoor Island and then at Cape Sansapor. In August she participated in operations against Halmahera and Morotai and then began preparations for the initial invasion of the Philippines.

On 16 October, with TG 8.G, she got underway for Leyte Gulf. Safely delivering her charges, transports with the first reinforcement groups aboard, on the 21st, she took up anti-aircraft station and, for several days, experienced meetings with the newest Japanese tactics, the kamikaze Throughout the next month she continued to escort troops and supplies to Leyte. With the dawn of the new year, 1945, she was enroute north for the Luwn operations. Arriving within the week she participated in preinvasion bombardment and then provided fire support during the landings on the 9th. For 18 days she patrolled, bombarded and fought off kamikazes.

Detached from the 7th Fleet after Luson, Morris reJoined the 5th Fleet and prepared for Okinawa. On 1 April she arrived off Kerama Retto with TG 51.11. For the next 5 days she escorted transports and oilers and cruised in various assigned sectors on antiaircraft and antisubmarine patrols. On the 6th, while patrolling station A-11, A "Kete," carrying either a heavy bomb or torpedo, closed in on her. Morris guns scored hits and set the plane afire, but could not stop it. Shortly after 1815 it crashed into the ship on the portside, between the No. 1 and No. 2 guns. Fires caused by the explosions spread quickly. Two hours were needed to bring them under control with another 30 minutes to extinguish them. Morris then returned to Kerama Retto where temporary repairs somewhat corrected her demolished bow and subsequent draft of 18 feet 3 inches, her large protrusion of plating on the starboard side and her damaged steering. On 22 May she started out across the Pacific and on 18 June entered the Hunters Point Drydock, San Francisco. Declared neither seaworthy nor habitable, she was decommissioned 9 November, struck from the Naval Register 28 November; scrapped and sold to Franklin Shipwrecking 2 August 1947 and then resold to the National Metal & Steel Corp., Terminal Island, Calif., 17 July 1949.

Morris received 15 battle stars for her action in World War II.


Morris DD- 417 - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

The DD-417 was the seventh vessel named in honor of Robert Morris, patriot, signer of the Declaration of Independence, and financier of the American Revolution. She was launched on 1 June 1939 and was commissioned on 5 March 1940.

As the flagship of Destroyer Squadron 2, the MORRIS joined the North Atlantic Patrol in the summer of 1941 and in early November, she and the squadron escorted a major convoy transporting 22,000 British troops from Britain to Nova Scotia, the first leg of its voyage to Basra in the Near East. Following Pearl Harbor, she went into the Charleston naval shipyard to be fitted out with the first fire control radar installed on a destroyer and on 3 January 1942, was underway for the Pacific. The MORRIS joined Task Force 17 and on 16 March, sailed for the Coral Sea to guard the carriers as their planes struck enemy shipping at Tulagi and in the Lousiade Archipelago. During the Battle of the Coral Sea, from 4 to 8 May, she splashed one enemy plane and damaged two others while screening the YORKTOWN (CV-5) and LEXINGTON (CV-2). When the latter was heavily damaged, she pulled alongside to rescue some 500 survivors. Damage received during the rescue forced her to return to Pearl Harbor where hurried repairs readied her for the Battle of Midway a month later. In that action, she again went to the aid of a sinking carrier and rescued more than 500 survivors of the YORKTOWN.

In late August 1942, she joined Task Force 61 for the landings on Guadalcanal. For the next two months, she screened carriers and patrolled among the Solomons. On 25 October, following a three-day independent sweep through the Gilberts, she rejoined Task Force 17 and took part in the Battle of Santa Cruz. During the battle, she destroyed six aircraft and once more rescued the crew of a sinking carrier, this time the HORNET, from which she took on 550 survivors. After retiring to Espiritu Santo for repairs to her superstructure damaged during the rescue, she was back in the Guadalcanal area, as screen and plane guard for the ENTERPRISE (CV-6) and on escort duty with the RUSSELL (DD-414).

In May 1943, she took part in the capture and occupation of Attu and Kiska in the Aleutians, and then returned to San Francisco for overhaul. In November, she joined the FRANKS (DD-554), HUGHES (DD-410), MAURY (DD-401), GRIDLEY (DD-380), and HULL (DD-350), escorting the LISCOME BAY, CORAL SEA, and CORREGIDOR during the Gilbert Islands offensive. For a fourth time, she was called to rescue survivors of a doomed carrier when, on 23 November 1943, an enemy submarine torpedoed the LISCOME BAY, which took 650 of her crew with her to the bottom.

The MORRIS continued with the task force as it pushed north to the Marshall Islands. There, on 30 January 1944, she led a column of warships in a shore bombardment mission against Wotje. Later, in action off Kwajalein Atoll, she provided close fire support off Namur, wiping out a Japanese force attempting a counter attack from an adjacent island. In mid-February, the MORRIS left Kwajalein and steamed with Task Group 51.11 to support the occupation of Eniwetok. Arriving on 17 February, she continued carrier operations through the 24th when she sailed for Pearl Harbor.

On 16 October 1944, with Task Group 8.6, she escorted transports bound for the Leyte Gulf. After safely delivering the transports and their reinforcements on the 21st, she took up her antiaircraft station and for several days, faced her first kamikaze attacks. Throughout the next month, the MORRIS continued to escort troops and supplies to Leyte. With the dawn of 1945, she was en route to Luzon. Arriving in early January, she participated in the pre-invasion bombardment and then provided fire support during the landings on 9 January. For 18 days, she patrolled, bombarded, and fought off kamikazes.


Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

Morris ( DD-417) was laid down at the navy yard, Norfolk, Va., 7 June 1938 launched 1 June 1939 sponsored by Mrs. Charles R. Nutter, great-granddaughter of Commodore Charles Morris, and commissioned 5 March 1940, Comdr. H. B. Jarrett in command.

Morris, flagship of DesRon 2, followed her shakedown with routine training schedules until the summer of 1941 when she joined the North Atlantic Patrol. With the entry of the United States into World War II, she entered the Charleston, N.C., Navy Yard, where she was equipped with the first fire control radar to be installed on a destroyer. By 3 January 1942 she was underway for Pearl Harbor, rejoining her squadron there at the end of February. Attached to TF 17, the destroyer sailed 16 March for Noumea, and into her first major enemy engagement, the Battle of Coral Sea. Prior to the battle, she guarded the carriers of the task force as their planes struck at enemy shipping in Tulagi Harbor and in the Lousiade Archipelago. During the 4-day battle, 4 to 8 May, she splashed one enemy plane and damaged two while screening Yorktown and Lexington and, when the latter was heavily damaged, pulled alongside to rescue some 500 survivors. Damage received during the rescue forced her back to Pearl Harbor where hurried repairs put her back into condition for the Battle of Midway a month later. In that action she again pulled alongside a sinking carrier, Yorktown, to rescue over 500 survivors.

Morris's next action came in late August when she joined TF 81 in support of the Guadalcanal campaign. For the next 2 months she screened carriers and patrolled among the Solomons. On 25 October, following a 3-day independent sweep through the Gilberts, she rejoined TF 17 and took part in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands. During the action she destroyed six aircraft and once more came to the rescue of a sinking carrier, this time Hornet, from which she took on 550 survivors. As in other rescue operations her superstructure was damaged, but, after repairs at Espiritu Santo, she was back in the Guadalcanal area, first operating with Enterprise and then as supply unit escort to the Russel.

In May 1943 Morris departed the southern Pacific and sailed north to support the capture and occupation of Attu and Kiska, the Aleutian end of the Japanese ribbon defense. Thence, after the Kiska operation, she returned to San Francisco for a 7-week overhaul. In November she again joined an air support group escorting Liscome Bay, Coral Sea, and Corregidor in the Gilbert Islands offensive, during which, for a fourth time, she went to aid a sinking carrier, Liscome Bay. As the task forces pressed further into the central Pacific, Morris sailed with them into the Marshalls. On 30 January 1944 she led a column of warships in a shore bombardment mission against Wotje. Thence she steamed to Kwajelein Atoll, where, while providing close fire support off Namur, she wiped out a Japanese counterattack force from an adjacent island. In mid-February she departed Kwajelein and moved with TG 51.11 to support the seizure and occupation of Eniwetok. Arriving on the 17th, she continued carrier operations through the 24th when she sailed for Pearl Harbor.

DD-417 returned to combat in April 1944, when, as a unit of the 7th Fleet, she took part in all the western New Guinea landings, beginning with Hollandia. In May and June she give are support in the Toem-Wakde-Sarmi areas and then during the Biak Island operation. In July she went against enemy guns on Noemfoor Island and then at Cape Sansapor. In August she participated in operations against Halmahera and Morotai and then began preparations for the initial invasion of the Philippines.

On 16 October, with TG 8.G, she got underway for Leyte Gulf. Safely delivering her charges, transports with the first reinforcement groups aboard, on the 21st, she took up anti-aircraft station and, for several days, experienced meetings with the newest Japanese tactics, the kamikaze. Throughout the next month she continued to escort troops and supplies to Leyte. With the dawn of the new year, 1945, she was enroute north for the Luzon operations. Arriving within the week she participated in preinvasion bombardment and then provided fire support during the landings on the 9th. For 18 days she patrolled, bombarded and fought off kamikazes.

Detached from the 7th Fleet after Luzon, Morris rejoined the 5th Fleet and prepared for Okinawa. On 1 April she arrived off Kerama Retto with TG 51.11. For the next 5 days she escorted transports and oilers and cruised in various assigned sectors on antiaircraft and antisubmarine patrols. On the 6th, while patrolling station A-11, a "Kate," carrying either a heavy bomb or torpedo, closed in on her. Morris' guns scored hits and set the plane afire, but could not stop it. Shortly after 1815 it crashed into the ship on the portside, between the No. 1 and No. 2 guns. Fires caused by the explosions spread quickly. Two hours were needed to bring them under control with another 30 minutes to extinguish them. Morris then returned to Kerama Retto where temporary repairs somewhat corrected her demolished bow and subsequent draft of 18 feet 3 inches, her large protrusion of plating on the starboard side and her damaged steering. On 22 May she started out across the Pacific and on 18 June entered the Hunters Point Drydock, San Francisco. Declared neither seaworthy nor habitable, she was decommissioned 9 November, struck from the Naval Register 28 November stripped and sold to Franklin Shipwrecking 2 August 1947 and then resold to the National Metal & Steel Corp., Terminal Island, Calif., 17 July 1949.

Morris received 15 battle stars for her action in World War II. Transcribed and formatted for HTML by Patrick Clancey, HyperWar Foundation


Happy Hour

When Betty reached out to me in hopes that The Progress-Index would write a story about her cherished neighbor, she was elated because none of the other media outlets she contacted had any interest in sharing Wawner's story.

After much reluctance, Wawner finally permitted the Hales to record him during their happy hours while he recounted moments of his life. Joe took it upon himself to compile his friend's tales of which Colonial Heights Mayor Gregory Kochuba presented at the American Legion Post 284.

Wawner's first ship was the destroyer USS Morris [DD-417] from March 4, 1940 to April 16, 1943. His ship was based in Iceland and protected cargo convoys taking war materials to England. Although the US was not yet in the war, they were in combat with German submarines going both ways. During one storm in the North Atlantic, his ship was almost lost when it rolled over 73 degrees.

When Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, the Morris was reoutfitted and sent through the Panama Canal [the first of four times] to the Pacific. During his time on the Morris, the ship was involved in the following battles: Coral Sea, Midway, Capture and Defense of Guadalcanal, Buin-Faisi-Tonolai Raid, Santa Cruz Island, Guadalcanal [Third Savo], and Consolidation of Soloman Islands.

During Wawner's time on the Morris, they picked up survivors of five aircraft carriers: Lexington, Yorktown, Lipscomb Bay, Wasp, and Hornet.

Aug. 31 through Dec. 16 of 1943, Wawner served on the aircraft carrier USS Corregidor [CVE-58] and took part in the Gilbert Islands Operations.

On the Minesweeper YMS-468 between Aug. 31, 1944 and Nov. 29, 1945, Wawner took part in two campaigns: Third Fleet operations against Japan and Minesweeping Operations Pacific [Honshu area].

One of Wawner's more riveting stories involved a typhoon.

"His ship the Morris - of which he was the last surviving crew member - was berthed in a harbor during a typhoon when a line broke loose and the ship was banging against another ship and the line was tangled on the propeller," shared Joe. "He was the senior person on the damage control for that part of the ship and dove down several times with a hacksaw until he was finally able to cut the line and untangle it from the propeller."

Due to problems caused by ingesting the filthy water, Wawner was treated for several years.


MORRIS DD 417

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Sims Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid June 7 1938 - Launched June 1 1939

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


USS Morris (DD-417) (1939-1946)

Request a FREE packet and get the best information and resources on mesothelioma delivered to you overnight.

All Content is copyright 2021 | About Us

Attorney Advertising. This website is sponsored by Seeger Weiss LLP with offices in New York, New Jersey and Philadelphia. The principal address and telephone number of the firm are 55 Challenger Road, Ridgefield Park, New Jersey, (973) 639-9100. The information on this website is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to provide specific legal or medical advice. Do not stop taking a prescribed medication without first consulting with your doctor. Discontinuing a prescribed medication without your doctor’s advice can result in injury or death. Prior results of Seeger Weiss LLP or its attorneys do not guarantee or predict a similar outcome with respect to any future matter. If you are a legal copyright holder and believe a page on this site falls outside the boundaries of "Fair Use" and infringes on your client’s copyright, we can be contacted regarding copyright matters at [email protected]


USS Morris (DD-417)

Morris was laid down at the navy yard, Norfolk, Virginia, 7 June 1938 launched 1 June 1939 sponsored by Mrs. Charles R. Nutter, great-granddaughter of Commodore Charles Morris and commissioned 5 March 1940, Commander H. B. Jarrett in command.

Morris, flagship of DesRon 2, followed her shakedown with routine training schedules until the summer of 1941 when she joined the North Atlantic Patrol. With the entry of the United States into World War II, she entered the Charleston, N.C., Navy Yard, where she was equipped with the first fire control radar to be installed on a destroyer. By 3 January 1942 she was underway for Pearl Harbor, rejoining her squadron there at the end of February. Attached to TF 17, the destroyer sailed 16 March, for Noumea, and into her first major enemy engagement, the Battle of the Coral Sea. Prior to the battle, she guarded the carriers of the task force as their planes struck at enemy shipping in Tulagi Harbor and in the Lousiade Archipelago. During the 4-day battle, 4&ndash8 May, she splashed one enemy plane and damaged two while screening Yorktown (CV-5) and Lexington (CV-2) and, when the latter was heavily damaged, pulled alongside to rescue some 500 survivors. Damage received during the rescue forced her back to Pearl Harbor where hurried repairs put her back into condition for the Battle of Midway a month later. In that action she again pulled alongside a sinking carrier, Yorktown, to rescue over 500 survivors.

Morris 's next action came in late August when she joined TF 61 in support of the Guadalcanal campaign. For the next 2 months she screened carriers and patrolled among the Solomon Islands. On 25 October, following a 3-day independent sweep through the Gilbert Islands, she rejoined TF 17 and took part in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands. During the action she destroyed six aircraft and once more came to the rescue of a sinking carrier, the Hornet (CV-8), from which she took on 550 survivors. As in other rescue operations her superstructure was damaged, but, after repairs at Espiritu Santo, she was back in the Guadalcanal area, first operating with Enterprise (CV-6) and then as supply unit escort to the Russell (DD-414).

In May 1943 Morris departed the southern Pacific and sailed north to support the capture and occupation of Attu and Kiska, the Aleutian end of the Japanese ribbon defense. Thence, after the Kiska operation, she returned to San Francisco for a 7-week overhaul. In November she again joined an air support group escorting Liscome Bay (CVE-56), Coral Sea (CV-43), and Corregidor (CVE-58) in the Gilbert Islands offensive, during which, for a fourth time, she went to aid a sinking carrier, Liscome Bay. As the task forces pressed further into the central Pacific, Morris sailed with them into the Marshall Islands. On 30 January 1944 she led a column of warships in a shore bombardment mission against Wotje Atoll. Thence she steamed to Kwajalein Atoll, where, while providing close fire support off Namur, she wiped out a Japanese counterattack force from an adjacent island. In mid-February she departed Kwajalein and moved with TG 51.11 to support the seizure and occupation of Eniwetok. Arriving on the 17th, she continued carrier operations through the 24th when she sailed for Pearl Harbor.

Morris returned to combat in April 1944, when as a unit of the 7th Fleet she took part in all the western New Guinea landings, beginning with Hollandia. In May and June she give fire support in the Toem-Wakde-Sarmi areas and then during the Biak Island operation. In July she went against enemy guns on Noemfoor Island and then at Cape Sansapor. In August she participated in operations against Halmahera and Morotai and then began preparations for the initial invasion of the Philippines.

On 16 October, with TG 8.6, she got underway for Leyte Gulf. Safely delivering her charges, transports with the first reinforcement groups aboard, on the 21st, she took up anti-aircraft station and, for several days, experienced meetings with the newest Japanese tactics, the kamikaze. Throughout the next month she continued to escort troops and supplies to Leyte. With the dawn of the new year, 1945, she was enroute north for the Luzon operations. Arriving within the week she participated in preinvasion bombardment and then provided fire support during the landings on the 9th. For 18 days she patrolled, bombarded and fought off kamikazes.

Detached from the 7th Fleet after Luzon, Morris rejoined the 5th Fleet and prepared for Okinawa. On 1 April she arrived off Kerama Retto with TG 51.11. For the next 5 days she escorted transports and oilers and cruised in various assigned sectors on antiaircraft and antisubmarine patrols. On the 6th, while patrolling station A-11, a Nakajima B5N (Allied designation: "Kate"), carrying either a heavy bomb or torpedo, closed in on her. Morris 's guns scored hits and set the plane afire, but could not stop it. Shortly after 1815 it crashed into the ship on the portside, between the No. 1 and No. 2 guns. Fires caused by the explosions spread quickly. Two hours were needed to bring them under control with another 30 minutes to extinguish them. Morris then returned to Kerama Retto where temporary repairs somewhat corrected her demolished bow and subsequent draft of 18 feet 3 inches, her large protrusion of plating on the starboard side and her damaged steering. On 22 May she started out across the Pacific and on 18 June entered the Hunters Point Drydock, San Francisco. Declared neither seaworthy nor habitable, she was decommissioned 9 November struck from the Naval Vessel Register 28 November stripped and sold to Franklin Shipwrecking 2 August 1947 and then resold to the National Metal & Steel Corp., Terminal Island, Calif., 17 July 1949.

Morris received 15 battle stars for her action in World War II. This article includes text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships.


USS Morris (DD-417)

The destroyer USS Morris (DD-417) was the seventh Morris to serve with U.S. naval forces. Built by Norfolk Navy Yard, she was launched on 1 June 1939 and commissioned on 5 March 1940.

The Morris served as flagship DesRon 2 and with the North Atlantic Patrol before World War II. She was upgraded with the first fire-control radar to be installed on a destroyer, and quickly began operations against the Japanese Navy in the Battle of Coral Sea, where she took part in screening duties of the carriers USS Lexington (CV-2) and USS Yorktown (CV-5). Following heavy damage to the Lexington, the Morris provided vital assistance rescuing survivors. During this operation, the Morris herself was damaged. She was back in service the following month in the Battle of Midway, where the Morris rescued survivors from the Yorktown.


Mục lục

Morris được đặt lườn tại Xưởng hải quân Norfolk ở Portsmouth, Virginia vào ngày 7 tháng 6 năm 1938. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 1 tháng 6 năm 1939 được đỡ đầu bởi bà Charles R. Nutter, chắt của Thiếu tướng Morris và nhập biên chế cùng Hải quân Mỹ vào ngày 5 tháng 3 năm 1940 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Trung tá Hải quân Harry B. Jarrett.

1940-1942 Sửa đổi

Khi đưa vào hoạt động, Morris được đặt làm soái hạm của Hải đội Khu trục 2, và tiến hành các hoạt động huấn luyện thường lệ cho đến mùa Hè năm 1941, khi nó tham gia hoạt động Tuần tra Trung lập tại vùng biển Bắc Đại Tây Dương. Sau khi Hoa Kỳ tham gia Thế Chiến II, nó đi đến Xưởng hải quân Charleston, nơi nó được trang bị một trong những bộ radar kiểm soát hỏa lực đầu tiên dành cho một tàu khu trục. Đến ngày 3 tháng 1 năm 1942, nó lên đường đi Trân Châu Cảng, gia nhập trở lại hải đội của nó vào cuối tháng 2.

Được phân về Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 17, Morris khởi hành vào ngày 16 tháng 3 để đi Nouméa, và tham gia trận chiến lớn đầu tiên của nó, Trận chiến biển Coral. Trước trận chiến, nó bảo vệ cho các tàu sân bay của lực lượng đặc nhiệm trong khi máy bay của chúng tấn công tàu bè đối phương tại cảng Tulagi và quần đảo Louisiade. Từ ngày 4 đến ngày 8 tháng 5, nó đã bắn rơi một máy bay đối phương và làm hư hại hai chiếc khác trong khi bảo vệ cho YorktownLexington, và khi Lexington bị hư hại nặng, nó đã cặp mạn chiếc tàu sân bay và cứu vớt khoảng 500 người sống sót. Những hư hại gây ra trong quá trình cứu hộ buộc nó phải quay lại Trân Châu Cảng để được sửa chữa khẩn cấp, đưa nó trở về trạng thái sẵn sàng chiến đấu trước Trận Midway một tháng sau đó. Trong trận này, chiếc tàu khu trục lại cặp mạn Yorktown để cứu vớt khoảng 500 người từ chiếc tàu sân bay bị đánh chìm.

Hoạt động tiếp theo của Morris diễn ra vào cuối tháng 8, khi nó gia nhập Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 61 để hỗ trợ cho Chiến dịch Guadalcanal. Trong hai tháng tiếp theo, nó hộ tống các tàu sân bay và tuần tra tại khu vực quần đảo Solomon. Vào ngày 25 tháng 10, sau ba ngày càn quét một cách độc lập suốt khu vực quần đảo Gilbert, nó gia nhập trở lại Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 17 và tham gia Trận chiến quần đảo Santa Cruz. Trong hoạt động này, nó bắn rơi sáu máy bay đối phương và một lần nữa đi đến để giải cứu cho tàu sân bay Hornet, cứu vớt được 550 người sống sót. Cấu trúc thượng tầng của nó bị hư hại trong quá trình giải cứu, nhưng sau khi được sửa chữa tại Espiritu Santo, nó quay trở lại khu vực Guadalcanal, thoạt tiên hoạt động cùng tàu sân bay Enterprise, và sau đó như một tàu hộ tống tiếp liệu cho Russell.

1943 Sửa đổi

Vào tháng 5 năm 1943, Morris rời khu vực Nam Thái Bình Dương đi lên phía Bắc, tham gia vào Chiến dịch quần đảo Aleut nhằm tái chiếm các đảo Attu và Kiska, nằm trong chuỗi quần đảo Aleut thuộc phạm vi phòng thủ ngoại vi Nhật Bản. Sau đó nó quay trở về San Francisco, California, được đại tu trong bảy tuần. Đến tháng 11, nó tham gia thành phần hộ tống cho các tàu sân bay Liscome Bay, CorregidorCoral Sea trong cuộc chiếm đóng quần đảo Gilbert, nơi nó đã trợ giúp cho Liscome Bay. Khi lực lượng đặc nhiệm tiếp tục hoạt động ở hướng Trung tâm Thái Bình Dương, chiếc tàu khu trục di chuyển cùng lực lượng đến khu vực quần đảo Marshall.

1944 Sửa đổi

Vào ngày 30 tháng 1 năm 1944, nó dẫn đầu một đội hình tàu chiến làm nhiệm vụ bắn phá đảo san hô Wotje. Sau đó nó đi đến đảo san hô Kwajalein, nơi nó bắn pháo hỗ trợ cho cuộc tấn công tại Namur đồng thời đánh trả cuộc phản công của lực lượng Nhật Bản từ một đảo lân cận. Vào giữa tháng 2, nó rời Kwajalein di chuyển cùng Đội đặc nhiệm 51.11 để hỗ trợ cho việc tấn công và chiếm đóng Eniwetok. Đến nơi vào ngày 17 tháng 2, nó hoạt động cùng các tàu sân bay cho đến ngày 24 tháng 2, khi nó lên đường quay trở về Trân Châu Cảng.

Morris quay trở lại khu vực chiến sự vào tháng 4 như một đơn vị thuộc Đệ Thất hạm đội, tham gia các cuộc đổ bộ lên bờ biển phía Tây của New Guinea, khởi đầu từ Hollandia. Trong tháng 5 và tháng 6, nó bắn pháo hỗ trợ tại khu vực Toem-Wakde-Sarmi cũng như trong hoạt động tại đảo Biak. Đến tháng 7, nó đối đầu với các khẩu đội pháo đối phương tại đảo Noemfoor rồi tại mũi Sansapor. Sang tháng 8, nó tham gia các hoạt động tấn công Halmahera và Morotai, rồi bắt đầu chuẩn bị cho các hoạt động đầu tiên nhằm tái chiếm Philippines.

Vào ngày 16 tháng 10, cùng với Đội đặc nhiệm 8.6, Morris lên đường hướng đến vịnh Leyte. Nó đưa được những tàu vận chuyển chất đầy lực lượng tăng viện đến nơi an toàn vào ngày 21 tháng 10, rồi trong nhiều ngày đã làm nhiệm vụ tuần tra phòng không, đối phó lại mối đe dọa từ chiến thuật mới nhất của Nhật Bản: tấn công tự sát kiểu kamikaze. Trong suốt tháng sau, nó hộ tống các đoàn tàu chuyển binh lính và tiếp liệu đến Leyte.

1945 Sửa đổi

Sang đầu năm 1945, Morris đi lên phía Bắc cho các chiến dịch tại Luzon, tham gia các cuộc bắn phá chuẩn bị, rồi bắn pháo hỗ trợ cho cuộc đổ bộ diễn ra vào ngày 9 tháng 1. Trong gần ba tuần, nó tuần tra, bắn phá các vị trí trên bờ và chống trả nhiều đợt tấn công kamikaze.

Được tách khỏi Đệ Thất hạm đội sau chiến dịch Luzon, Morris gia nhập trở lại Đệ Ngũ hạm đội và chuẩn bị để hoạt động tại Okinawa. Vào ngày 1 tháng 4, nó đi đến ngoài khơi Kerama Retto cùng với Đội đặc nhiệm 51.11, và trong năm ngày tiếp theo, nó hộ tống các tàu vận chuyển và tàu chở dầu trong những nhiệm vụ khác nhau, cũng như tuần tra phòng không và chống tàu ngầm. Vào ngày 6 tháng 4, đang khi tuần tra, một chiếc máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi Nakajima B5N "Kate", mang theo một quả ngư lôi hay bom hạng nặng đã tiếp cận nó. Hỏa lực phòng không của con tàu đã bắn cháy nó, nhưng không thể ngăn chặn, và lúc 18 giờ 15 phút, nó đâm vào con tàu bên mạn trái giữa các tháp pháo 1 và 2. Đám cháy do vụ nổ lan rộng nhanh chóng phải mất đến hai giờ để kiểm soát đám cháy và thêm nữa giờ để dập tắt hoàn toàn. Nó rút lui về Kerama Retto, nơi việc sửa chữa tạm thời được thực hiện cho phần mũi bị biến dạng, bánh lái hư hại và nhiều phần lườn tàu hư hỏng bên mạn phải.

Vào ngày 22 tháng 5, Morris bắt đầu vượt Thái Bình Dương để quay trở về Hoa Kỳ, về đến Xưởng hải quân San Francisco vào ngày 18 tháng 6. Được xem không còn phù hợp để tác chiến hay sử dụng, con tàu được cho xuất biên chế vào ngày 9 tháng 11. Tên nó được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 28 tháng 11, và nó được bán cho hãng vào ngày Franklin Shipwrecking 2 tháng 8 năm 1947 rồi được bán lại cho hãng National Metal and Steel Corporation tại Los Angeles, California vào ngày 17 tháng 7 năm 1949 để được tháo dỡ.

Morris được tặng thưởng mười lăm Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


Odkazy [ editovat | editovat zdroj ]

Reference [ editovat | editovat zdroj ]

  1. ↑ abcdDD-417 Morris [online]. Globalsecurity.org, rev. 2005-04-26 [cit. 2011-01-19]. Dostupné online. (anglicky)  
  2. ↑ PEJČOCH, Ivo NOVÁK, Zdeněk HÁJEK, Tomáš. Válečné lodě 4. Praha: Naše vojsko, 1993. ISBN80-206-0357-3 . S.𧈆.  
  3. ↑ abcdefUSS Morris [online]. Destroyer History Foundation [cit. 2011-01-19]. Dostupné online. (anglicky)  

Literatura [ editovat | editovat zdroj ]

  • HRBEK, Ivan HRBEK, Jaroslav. Loďstva států účastnících se druhé světové války. Praha: Naše vojsko, 1994. 231 s. ISBN80-206-0245-3 .  
  • PEJČOCH, Ivo NOVÁK, Zdeněk HÁJEK, Tomáš. Válečné lodě 4. Praha: Naše vojsko, 1993. 374 s. ISBN80-206-0357-3 . (česky)  

Externí odkazy [ editovat | editovat zdroj ]

V tomto článku byl použit překlad textu z článku USS Morris (DD-417) na anglické Wikipedii.


Watch the video: Винтовка Бертье. Часть 1. (January 2022).