Information

Alcyone-AK-24 - History


Alcyone

Alcyone is the brightest star in the constellation Pleiades.

(AK-24: dp. 14,225, 1. 459'1"; b. 63'; dr. 26'5", s. 16.5 k.; cpl.399; a. 1 5", 4 3"; cl. Areturus; T. C2)

Mormacgull was laid down under a Maritime Commission eontraet (MC hull 30) on 12 January 1939 at Chester, Pa., by the Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 28 August 1939;
sponsored by Miss Barbara Ann Moore; owned and operated as a cargo vessel by the Moore-MeCormack Lines, purchased by the Navy on 31 May 1941, renamed Alcyone and designated Ak-24 on 3 June 1941; converted for naval service by the Boston Navy Yard, and placed in commission on 15 June 1941, Comdr. D. M. McGurl in command.

The cargo ship then reported for duty to Commander, Train, Atlantie Fleet. F ollowing shakedown training, she departed New York City on 4 September and shaped a course for Ieeland. The vessel arrived at Reykjavik on the 16th and began disembarking passengers and discharging cargo. Upon the completion of this task, she left Icelandic waters on 5 October sailed southwestward across the Atlantic and arrived at Charieston, S.C., on the 13th. After one month of voyage repairs, the ship moved, via Norfolk, Va., to New York City to take on cargo and sailed on 28 November for the Caribbean. Among her ports of call during the cruise were Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Jamaica, San Juan and Vieques Puerto Rico, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, Antigua; and Trinidad before she arrived back at New York on 27 December.

During the first three months of 1942, Alcyone made two more voyages from New York and Norfolk to various points in the Caribbean. Among her assignments during these trips was the evacuation of civilians from Antigua to the United States. On one occasion, her convoy was attacked by German submarines. Although three consorts fell victim to torpedo attacks, Alcyone completed her trip unscathed and arrived back at Charleston on 12 April where she underwent availability.

Alcyone was assigned to the Naval Transportation service on 1 June and set sail trom Norfolk on the 10th in a convoy bound for New Zealand with troops and equipment of the 1st Marine Division which would land on Guadaleanal early in August. She transited the Panama Canal on 18 June, joined the Pacific Fleet, and reached Wellington on 11 July. After discharging her cargo the ship moved to Auckland, New Zealand, to take on material for transportation to advanced bases in the Pacific.

Aleyone sailed independently from Auckland on 31 July and proceeded to Noumea, New Caledonia, and Espiritu Santo to distribute her cargo. Following these stops, she arrived at Sydney, Australia, on the 28th and underwent voyage repairs. On 8 September, the vessel left Australia, shaped a course for the west coast of the United States, and reached San Franeiseo Calif, on 29 September. She then entered the Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, Calif, for conversion to an attack cargo ship. During the yard work, three 30-ton booms, a boat repair shop, and additional berthing space were added. Alcyone was redesignated AKA-7 on 26 November and was reassigned to Amphibious Forees, Pacific Fleet.

The conversion work was completed early in November, and Alcyone departed San Franeiseo on the 6th. She was then involved in amphibious exercises and shakedown training off San Diego, Calif The ship left California on 21 December and headed for the east coast of the United States. She retransited the Panama Canal on 2 March, arrived at the Charleston Navy Yard on the 9th, and underwent repairs for a month before sailing to Norfolk in mid-April.

Soon after reaching Norfolk, Alcyone began a period of training exercises in the Chesapeake Bay which lasted until early June. She sailed with Task Foree 65 on the 8th for the Medi- Her convoy repulsed several enemy attacks en route before arriving safely at Oran, Algeria on 22 June. She took part in amphibious landing exercises an] loaded her cargo holds m preparation for the upcoming assault on Sicily.

Alcyone got underway on 5 July; arrived off Scoglitti, Sicily, five days later; and began discharging her cargo despite rough seas and frequent enemy air harassment. She landed her equipment and troops with the loss of only a few small boats, left the area on the 13th, and arrived back at Oran on 16 July. From there, the vessel moved on to Norfolk, where she arrived on 3 August.

A er a brief period in port, the attack cargo ship proceeded onee again to the Pacific. She transited the Panama Canal on the last day of August and stopped at San Franeiseo before eontinuing on to Hawaii. Alcyone touched at Pearl Harbor on 30 September and participated in training exercises off Maui during October. She got underway on 10 November with Task Group (TG) 52.11 to participate in the invasion of Makin Island, Gilbert Islands. On the 20th, the vessel reached the transport area off that island and began unloading her cargo. Members of her crew also assisted other vessels in discharging their passengers and supplies. Despite heavy enemy resistance, Aleyone suecessfully completed her operations and left the area on the 24th.

After a brief layover at Pearl Harbor, Alcyone continued on to San Diego, where she arrived on 19 December. She remained there through the Christmas holidays and sailed for Hawaii on 13 January 1944. Upon reaching Pearl Harbor, the ship made final preparations for the assault on Kwajalein. She sortied from Oahu on 22 January and reached the transport area off Kwajalein on the 31st. Alcyone unloaded her cargo and assisted in the landing of troops from other ships as well. Enemy shore fire and dangerous coral reefs somewhat delayed her operations, and Alcyone remained in the area until mid-February.

The cargo ship made a port call at Pearl Harbor before continuing on to the California coast. She reached San Pedro on 26 February and proceeded to a shipyard at Terminal Island for overhaul. A series of amphibious landing exercises followed the completion of the yard work, and Alcyone left the west coast on 18 April, bound for Hawaii. She reached Pearl Harbor and joined forces preparing to attack Guam in the Marianas.

The cargo ship anchored off that island on 22 July and commenced unloading operations. Upon completing this assignment, she got underway to return to Hawaii. She arrived at Pearl Harbor on 10 August and, shortly thereafter, entered drydock for minor repairs. The ship got underway again on 15 September and sailed to Manus, Admiralty Islands. After approximately a month of preparations and training, she sailed on 14 October as a member of TG 79.2, which was scfieduled to begin the liberation of the Philippine Islands.

The attacking force reached waters off the beaches of Leyte on the 20th and began the landing operations that same day. Alcyone discharged her cargo while undergoing enemy air attack and mortar fire from shore batteries. She completed her unloading operations on the 22d and proceeded to kollandia, New Guinea, to reprovision. On 14 November, the ship sailed for Leyte to resupply the beachhead which had been established there.

After unloading her cargo at Leyte, she retired to the Admiralties and reached Manus on the 24th. From that island, she moved to Cape Gloucester, New Britain, to take on units of the 40th Infantry Division. The ship carried these troops back to Manus where she joined TG 79.4. On 16 December the group sailed to Huon Gulf, New Guinea, for a series of amphibious landing exercises. Upon their completion, the ships returned to Manus for final loadout prior to the invasion of Luzon, the largest island of the Philippines.

On the last day of 1944, Alcyone sortied with TG 79.4, for the assault on the Lingayen beaches which began on 9 January 1945. The task of unloading her cargo was made more difficult by rough seas, Japanese suicide boat attacks, and enemy air raids. Alcyone remained in the area for five days before she finished emptying her holds. On the 13th, she set a course for Leyte where she replenished her stores before returning to Luzon on the 29th with a small attacking force for a landing at Zambales. The assault was unopposed, and operations were completed on 31 January.

Alcyone left Philippine waters on 11 February bound for the United States. She made port calls at Manus and at Pearl Harbor before reaching San Francisco on 12 March. The ship then entered the Moore Drydock Co., Oakland, Calif, for overhaul. During this yard period, her kingposts were replaced by quadruped masts, her troop berths were removed, and temporary cargo storage cages were installed.

Upon completion of the yard work on 2 June, the ship was assigned to Service Forces, Pacific Fleet. On the 8th, Alcyone was routed to Seattle, Wash., for loading. She departed Seattle on 21 June and shaped a course for Ulithi. After pausing there briefly on 9 July, she got underway to rendezvous with logistic support ships provisioning the warships of the Fast Carrier Task Force in waters off the Japanese home islands.

Alcyone completed unloading at sea on 2 August and set sail for Guam to replenish. While the ship was in the Marianas Japan capitulated. Alcyone rejoined the logistics group on 23 August; and, three days later, she and her consorts entered Tokyo Bay. After unloading, Alcyone left Japan and returned to Guam to take on more cargo and supplies. She arrived back in Tokyo Bay on 1 October and began replenishing ships of the occupation forces.

Alcyone remained in Japanese waters through early March 1946. She shuttled supplies and equipment among the ports of Yokosuka, Ominato, Aomori, Otaru, Wakayama, Sasebo, and Kure. The ship departed Yokosuka on 11 March and headed back to the United States. She arrived at San Francisco on 29 March and began a period of upkeep. On 15 May, the vessel proceeded to San Diego where she remained for two weeks. Alcyone continued sailing southward and transited the Panama Canal on 9 June. Five days later, she made port at Norfolk, Va.

Preparations to deactivate the ship soon began. Alcyone was decommissioned at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Va., on 23 July 1946 and was transferred to the War Shipping Administration on 24 July 1946 for disposal. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 15 August 1946. She was sold later that same year and was refitted for service as a merchant vessel.

Alcyone earned eight battle stars for her World War II service.

FS-195 was acquired from the Army on 8 December 1951. She was named Alcyone, designated AKL-37, and was transferred to the Republic of Korea on 12 December 1951. The ship served Korea until early in 1960 when—while still in the Orient—she was returned to the custody of the American Navy. Her name was struck from the Navy 11st on 1 February 1960, and she was sold to Hong Kong Rolling Mills, Ltd., in June 1960 for scrapping.


News From Fort Schuyler

EARLY RISER - Word of the recent promotion of JUSTIN MILLER '08 to the post of commercial coordinator for the West Coast Industrial Express (WCIE) joint service operated by Industrial Maritime Carriers and Associated Transport Line, was announced on January 21 in Heavy Lift and Project Forward International News. Since graduation Justin has worked in operational and technical assignments within the Intermarine Americas services, serving as Port Captain in Houston. According to his new boss: "Justin's solid operational experience, technical skills and enthusiasm make him, a perfect fit for our WCIE service." (http://www.heavyliftpfi.com/content/NewsItem.aspx?id=1111)

BRAVO ZULU - The New York Container Terminal's four-year full scholarship to attend SUNY Maritime College was awarded this past December to DARA KOVARSKY 4/C. Cadet Kovarsky, a resident of Stony Brook, is a member of the Maritime College Sailing Team. She arrived at the college sporting a 97% high school average. According to a posting on the Maritime College website, this is the fifth year that such an award has been made by the New York Container Terminal, which is located in Staten Island. (For more go to www.sunymaritime.edu and to www.nycterminal.com)

FOOD FOR THOUGHT - There is a series of muckraking reports on the contribution of cruise ships to ocean pollution in the newsletter of the DC Bureau, an organization staffed by investigative reporters who write on overlooked news stories of significance. A recent report, David Rosenfeld's "Dirty Waters: Cashing in on Ocean Pollution" note that there has not been much government oversight of the industry for the past decade. In the late 1990's 3 cruise ship lines were fined $52 million for dumping and entered into an agreement to maintain environmental officers with a direct line to management for a probationary period. "The probationary period has since expired and the federal government now had no authority to determine in the environmental officers are qualified and monitoring cruise line compliance with environmental laws."

Rosenfeld continues: "One of the environmental officers hired as a result of the probation was WALTER NADOLNY '78, who worked on board Carnival Cruises and Norwegian Cruise Lines. He is now assistant professor at the State University of New York Maritime College. Nadolny says it's the pure volume of materials discharged into the ocean that concerned him most. Aside from sewage, Nadolny says that food waste - which isn't regulated at all - strikes him as a greater concern. The average cruise ship serves between 10,000 and 12,000 meals per day. On a ship of 5,000 [with] people eating four to five meals a day, the total is closer to 25,000 meals. Food waste is then ground up, put into a holding tank and discharged as food slurry'. 'This massive amount of food starts self digesting and becomes this extremely acidic mess, probably worse than raw sewage,' Nadolny said'.'It's not such much feeding the fish as it is dumping an acidic mass into the water that can harm coral reefs.'" (For this article and others in the series go to www.dcbureau.org)

EBB TIDE - A graduate from the war years, CAPT JERE C. AUSTIN '40, died September 18, 2009 at the age of 88. He was a resident of Salisbury, NC. During the course of World War II he sailed to Europe, Africa and the Pacific. In an interview about his war experiences for the University of North Carolina oral history project "To Honor a Generation", he recounted his time aboard the then state-of-the-art ship, USS ALCYONE AK-24 (ex-M/S MORMACGULL), from 1941 to 1944. "I was assigned to her as Assistant Engineer Officer by the Navy in October 1941, two months before Pearl Harbor. I was not yet 21, too young to vote and not old enough to register for the draft. But I had three plus years of maritime and naval reserve training and held a full-time job as Third Engineer on steam-powered, merchant ships with both Moore-McCormack and the Atlantic, Gulf & West Indies lines. When the Navy requisitioned that ship, I was unemployed for a few days until the Navy requisitioned me. They needed an engineer for ALCYONE, which was diesel-powered, and I had a diesel 'ticket' that authorized me to operated any sized motor ship afloat." For the next year or so the ALCYONE operated as a military cargo ship outbound/sugar carrier inbound. She was then converted into an Attack Cargo ship (AKA-7) for service in the Pacific "She began her new assignment by carrying US Marines to the beaches of the Solomon Islands, in the South Pacific, where they took the first territory back from Japan, and she carried on until V-J Day marked the end for the Axis Powers." Jere, who retired from the U.S. Naval Reserve as a Captain after 20 years, is survived by his second wife, Mary, two children, three grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. ("To Honor a Generation" can be found at www.unctv.org/WWII/veterans/navy/jaustin.html)

RONALD JAMES PECK '59 died at the age of 71 in Baltimore, MD on September 21, 2009. He is survived by his four children and three grandchildren. According to an obituary published in TheLehigh Valley Express Times on October 10, he grew up on a farm in Pennsylvania. "He was the first in his family to attend college, winning a full scholarship from NROTC and graduating from SUNY Maritime College with a Bachelor of Engineering in 1959. Ron served in the Navy. During his Navy and engineering careers he was fortunate to enjoy a lifetime of travel to exotic and unique countries. Through his travels and experiences he has maintained his family roots, his home, in the Lehigh Valley. (The full obituary is found at http://obits.lehighvalleylive.com/obituaries/etpa/obituary.aspx?n=ronald-james-peck&pid=134216604)

GERARD ZINK Oct. '44 died in January 2009. According to the alumni roster he was a resident of Lynbrook, NY.


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        US FORCES IN NZ DURING 2nd WORLD WAR

        With the bombing of Pearl Harbour in December 1941 which lead to the direct involvement of the United States in what had become a global war, Australia and New Zealand looked to the United States for help in building up their depleted forces. About 1 in 12 of their populations were under arms but the majority of these were in the Middle East or Britain.

        Nothing seemed to be stopping the Japanese advance south through Asia, the Philippines and Indonesia. There was serious talk of abandoning Australia and New Zealand but Admiral Ernest King, US Navy Chief of Staff, told President Roosevelt "We cannot, in honour, let Australia and New Zealand down. They are our brothers, and we must not allow them to be overrun by Japan."

        At a meeting in late December 1941 between Prime Minister Churchill and President Roosevelt three recommendations were made which affected New Zealand. These were:-

        1. To secure the British Antipodes and the islands and sea lanes between them and the West Coast of North America and Panama

        2. To contain the Japanese where they were and attempt to reduce them with attrition tactics by submarine and aircraft carriers

        3. To give limited assistance to the defence of India/Burma/China.

        This last recommendation indirectly helped the South Pacific area as it was hoped that increased activity in the Asian area would help draw off Japanese forces from the South Pacific.

        Admiral King was not greatly in favour of the "Germany first" policy and did everything he could to ensure that the Pacific area of conflict received a fair share of war material and men. The US Joint Chiefs of Staff agreed at a meeting in March 1942 that Auckland would become a Naval Operations Base and Wellington was designated as an Amphibious Training Base.

        The 6th of January 1942 was a typical summer's day in Wellington with a fresh north-westerly blowing however in the higher echelons of Government there was considerable tension with news of Japanese successes in Malaysia and Indonesia. Harbour watchers saw an unusual ship berth at Queen's Wharf. Painted grey overall, her decks were covered with large crates, on top of which sat plane fuselages. It was the PRESIDENT POLK, the first US military vessel to arrive in New Zealand after the United States entered the war. It had sailed from San Francisco on 19 December 1941 with urgently needed supplies for the Philippines but because of the rapidly worsening situation had been directed to Wellington for fuel before continuing to Surabaya. Just as she was about to sail from Wellington 2 days later it was again redirected to Brisbane to unload the cargo of Boston bombers and Kittyhawk fighters. These aircraft and supplies were among the first American supplies to land in Australia and little did Wellingtonians know that the visit of the PRESIDENT POLK was the prelude to an enormous build-up of United States forces in the South Pacific.

        PRESIDENT POLK. Photo taken at end of war. When the President Polk first visited Wellington it was virtually on its maiden voyage and operated by American President Lines. It was taken over by US Navy in 1943.

        After the PRESIDENT POLK visit, Wellington and Auckland saw an increasing number of un-familiar ships. USS REPUBLIC (AP-33) on its way back to the US after landing refuges from Dutch East Indies in Australia passed through Wellington on 12 January and the next day the Dutch vessel BOSCHFONTEIN which had been operating in the Dutch East Indies and had just managed to escape the Japanese. It became a frequent visitor to both Auckland and Wellington carrying US troops to the Pacific and Burma was zones. USS PRESIDENT GRANT arrived on 17 January 1942 and like the REPUBLIC had sailed from San Francisco for Manila but had been diverted to Dutch East Indies and was on her way back to Los Angeles. Her route to America gives some idea of the concern for slower ships with no escorts. Leaving Wellington on 20 January she headed south of the Chatham Islands and across the Pacific to Talara, Peru.

        March saw a greater number of ships arrive at Wellington, among them USS MOUNT VERNON (AP-22) after delivering 5000 men of the 32 Infantry Division to Adelaide. USS TALAMANCIA (AF-15) made the first of many visits to New Zealand when she arrived in Wellington on 16 March.

        The 18 March 1942 saw the arrival of the WILLIAM CLARK, the first Liberty ship to visit New Zealand. She was followed 5 days later by MERIWETHER LEWIS, only the second Liberty ship delivered on the Pacific Coast and ROBERT GREY both from the same Kaiser yard of Oregon Shipbuilding Corp, Portland. These vessels were on their way to Brisbane. Sadly all these ship built within days of each other were torpedoed only weeks apart in the North Atlantic later that year and early 1943.

        The Liberty ship JOHN ADAMS called at Wellington on 16 April for engine repairs while on her way from San Francisco to Noumea and Brisbane. After unloading a part cargo in Noumea she left for Brisbane on 4 May. Next day she was torpedoed by the Japanese submarine I-21. Her remaining cargo of aviation fuel caught fire and after several explosions sank. Only 24 of her crew survived but this month old ship has the distinction of being the first Liberty ship sunk by enemy action.

        In the next 2 years Wellington was not only used as the Amphibian Training Base for the 1st and 2nd Marine Divisions but was also used as a bunkering stop for unescorted vessels running between the West Coast of the USA and Australia, India and the Middle East. Wellington had a greater number of ships calling than otherNew Zealand ports as it was more strategically located on the southern route. There was an acute lack of suitable escort ships which required the ships to sail as far south as possible across the Pacific. Harbour pilots in Wellington were kept very busy. Pilot Capt Fred Gell could recount stories of ships sailing right past Wellington and up through Cook Strait only to return the next day. Their first questions when he boarded were "Is this New Zealand, what is the local time and what is the date?". Many had a problem with the date having only recently crossed the date line An example of the enormous increase in ships and the difficulty of manning them with trained crews is shown in a contemporary log extract The crew that came aboard shortly before the ship left Vancouver, Washington were all green hands. There were six officers and about 70 men. None of the officers and only one of the men had ever been to sea in the past.

        On 20 May 1942 saw the first arrival of ships associated with the 1st Marine Division and which were to become familiar to Wellingtonians. USS AMERICAN LEGION (AP-35) and USS NEVILLE (AP-16) berthed at Aotea Quay. Two days later, the NEVILLE's sister ship USS FULLER (AP -14) and USS McCAWLEY (AP-10) arrived and the next day USS HUNTER LIGGETT (AP-27), a sister ship to AMERICAN LEGION. These 5 ships arrived virtually empty having unloaded the bulk of their cargo at Tonga but they did carry a number trucks, jeeps and landing craft.

        Vice Admiral R H Ghormley had been appointed Commander South Pacific Area and most of his staff arrived in Wellington on the former trans Atlantic liner AMERICA renamed USS WESTPOINT (AP- 25) on 31 May 1942.

        The first Marine units arrived on USS BELLATRIX (AK-20) from Norfolk, Virginia on 3 June 1942 followed by the DELBRASIL on 8 June. Three days later a further group arrived on USS ELECTRA (AK-21). All vessels carried large cargoes of trucks, bulldozers, guns, ammunition, petrol and landing craft.

        On a cold grey morning of 14 June, a large two funnelled liner berthed at Kings Wharf. The decks of USS WAKEFIELD were lined with over 6000 marines of the 1st Echelon of the 1st Marine Division.

        Click on the following link to see the arrival of WAKEFIELD and hear an interview with a marine who arrived in Wellington on that ship. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j__gXJpnd_

        Aotea Quay L - R BARNETT , LIBRA and FOMALHAULT

        USS FOMALHAULT (AK-22) and LIPCOMBE LYKES arrived at the end of the month with more cargo and on 11 July the 2nd Echelon arrived in a convoy of ships. These were USS JOHN ERICSSON, USS BARNETT (AP-11), USS GEORGE F ELLIOTT (AP-13), USS JUPITER (AK-43), USS ALCYONE (AK-24), USS ALCHIBA (AK-23), USS LIBRA (AK-53), and USS MIZAR (AF-12).

        JOHN ERICSSON exKungsholm

        To make room for these ships, those attack transports and cargo ships already loaded moved into the stream, some with troops embarked. USS HEYWOOD (AP-6) arrived on 16 July from Noumea to become part of an attack force that was being assembled in Wellington.

        On 22 July Task Force 62 sailed from Wellington for Guadalcanal. The following vessels made up that convoy:-

        FULLER, AMERICAN LEGION, BELLATRIX, McCAWLEY, BARNETT, GEORGE F ELLIOTT, LIBRA, HUNTER LIGGETT, ALCHIBA, FOMALHAULT, NEVILLE and HEYWOOD. They were accompanied by the following escort ships:- HMAS AUSTRALIA, HMAS CANBERRA, HMAS HOBART, CHICAGO (CA-29), SALT LAKE CITY (CA-25), PATTERSON (DD-392) and RALPH TALBOT (DD-390) which were joined in the next few days by JARVIS (DD-393), SELFRIDGE (DD-359), MUGFORD (DD-389), HENLEY (DD-391), BLUE (DD-387), BAGLEY (DD-386) and HELM (DD-388).

        Before leaving Wellington the heavy cruisers CHICAGO & SALT LAKE CITY both launched their Curtis Floatplanes. One of the aircraft flew across Cook Strait and landed on Kenepuru Sound opposite The Portage. No reason for the flight is known but at the time the Marlborough Sounds were being looked at as a possible Fleet anchorage, so probably the opportunity was taken to make use of the aircraft off these cruisers for a quick aerial reconnaissance of the whole area.

        Many of the above vessels suffered damage during the landings at Guadalcanal from the Japanese forces and the transport GEORGE F ELLIOT was sunk.

        Secrecy was important to the war effort and US servicemen were warned not to divulge any information relative to ships, movements or operations. One who did mention casually to his girlfriend a departure date for practice landing was tried by a US Navy Court-martial and received a severe sentence. The Wellington Harbourmaster, Captain P S Peterson, refused to attend the regular Harbour Board meetings because of questions from Board members about ship movements.

        After the bulk of the division had sailed for Guadalcanal, the next arrivals were on the BLOEMFONTEIN which arrived on 3rd August 1942. Most of these men sailed for the Solomon Islands on 26 August on FULLER which had returned after the initial landings.

        Major camps in Wellington were established at MacKay's Crossing, Pauatahanui, Judgeford, Paremata, TitahiBay, Trentham, Waterloo, Hutt Park, Gracefield, Stokes Valley, Kaiwharra, Anderson Park, Oriental Bay BoatHarbour, Central Park, Hataitai, Johnsonville and Takapu Road.

        After the landings in Guadalcanal by the 1st Marine Division the supply of material obtained in New Zealandwas carried out by USS ROAMER (AF-19), USS TALAMANCA (AF-15), CYGNUS (AF-23), DELPHINUS (AF-24), TAURUS (AF-25). They were joined by a number of small New Zealand ships which were requisitioned by the New Zealand Government.

        October 1942 saw the arrival in Wellington on the first of many visits by USS PRESIDENT JACKSON (AP-37), USS PRESIDENT HAYES (AP-39), USS PRESIDENT ADAMS (AP-38) and USS CRESCENT CITY (AP-40). These fours vessels were regular visitors to Wellington and Auckland until 1944 and during this time often carried New Zealand servicemen. They were all C3-AP & C type vessels as were POLK, MONROE and DELBRASIL

        During the later part of 1942, almost every ship calling at Wellington had on board LCVP and LCN landing craft which became a very common sight on Wellington Harbour during the build up to the departure of the 2nd Marine Division.

        Men of the 2nd Marine Division began arriving in Wellington in November 1942 on MATSONIA, MORMACPORT, BRASTAGI, AGUIPRINCE, PRESIDENT MONROE and WELTEVREDEN.

        Typical of many troop transports, the MORMACPORT was a C3 type merchant ship converted to troop carrying by the installation of three-high steel bunks in the 'tween decks, with very basic toilet and washing facilities housed in wooden erections on deck. There were limited galley facilities and fresh water supplies were really inadequate for the 2000 men they were designed to carry. The anti-aircraft armament was supplemented by the anti-aircraft guns the troops carried.

        The French liner ILE DE FRANCE arrived on 26 December 1942 with 9000 troops on board but they were only allowed ashore for a route march as they sailed for Bombay the following day.

        The Liberty ship PETER H BURNETT bought cargo to Wellington from United States on 30 December 1942 and then proceeded to Australia to load wool. She left Newcastle for San Francisco on 21 January 1943 and was torpedoed by the Japanese submarine I-21 south of Lord Howe Island the following day. This was one of I-21's successes. On 18 January she sank the Union Company KALINGO 110 miles from Sydney en-route to New Plymouth, 21 hours later the American tanker MOBILEUBE was damaged and shortly afterwards the Australian IRON KNIGHT was sunk. The activity of the Japanese submarines continued until June 1943 and 11 ships were sunk off the Australian east coast including Union Company's LIMERICK, the Australian Hospital Ship CENTAUR with heavy loss of life and the US Tank Landing ship LST-469 which had sailed from Wellington a few days earlier.

        The heavy cruiser LOUISVILLE (CA-28) arrived in Wellington on 17 March 1943 from Havannah Harbour, New Hebrides for crew leave and repairs remaining until 3 April. Apart from visit by SALT LAKE CITY and CHICAGO the previous year, this was the only visit by major warships during the war period although a large number of destroyers made regular calls.

        A strange convey arrived on 22 April 1943 consisting of 5 Landing Ship Tank (LST). They were the first to arrive in New Zealand and sailed some days later for Australia to be followed the next month by another 9.

        By June 1943, marine units in the Wellington Area were at full strength and fit. They were practising landings on the beaches of the Kapiti coast. Four ships, CRESCENT CITY, GEORGE CLYMER, HUNTER LIGGETT and AMERICAN LEGION were anchored just south of Kapiti Island conducting full scale landing exercises on 20 June. The landings included of live firing from shore, New Zealand warships HMNZS RATA and Fairmiles 400 and 403 patrolling to seaward as a submarine screen and RNZAF Kittyhawk aircraft from Woodbourne, Vincent aircraft from Rongotai and Harvard aircraft from Ohakea. The weather deteriorated with a gale, on-shore north westerly wind. Overnight a LCM broached and sank. 9 men were reported to have lost their lives although unconfirmed reports say the loss of life was much higher. In March 2009 Kathy Butcher supplied the following information. Her grandfather, H C Winfrey, was the only officer on the landing craft and was lost in the accident. The landing craft ran ashore onto a sand bank and was being towed back to the AMERICAN LEGION. The commanding officer of the ship said they were to remain on board the landing craft even though the seas were very rough. A large wave washed some of the men overboard and according to reports 13 men died. The landing craft did not sink.

        Other training areas used in 1943 were at Port Underwood and on the Mahia Peninsula.

        Click on the following link to see video clips of training exercises on Wellington Harbour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQY-fVMAHiE

        At midday on 1st November 1943, Wellington Harbour, which had been full of ships earlier that morning, was virtually empty. A whole division of marines had departed. They were part of Operation Galvanic &ndash the invasion of Tarawa &ndash and formed the Southern group of a convoy which consisted of 18 attack transports, 11 attack cargo ships, 7 merchant cargo ships, 38 LST's and 2 dock landing ships. They had between them 35,000 troops of the 2nd Marine Division and 27th Army Division. The supporting ships were made up of 13 battleships, 8 heavy cruisers, 4 light cruisers, 4 aircraft carriers, 4 light carriers, 4 jeep carriers, 1 carrier transport, 56 destroyers, 14 destroyer escorts, 3 minesweepers and 10 submarines.

        The following ships embarked the bulk of the Division in Wellington:-

        MONROVIA (APA-13), SHERIDAN (APA-51), HEYWOOD (APA-6), DOYEN (APA-1), VIRGO (AKA-20), LA SALLE (AP-102), ZEILIN (APA-3), ARTHUR MIDDLETON (APA-25), WILLIAM P BIDDLE (APA-8), HARRY LEE (APA-10), THUBAN (AKA-19), HARRIS (APA-2), ORMSBY (APA-49), J FRANKLIN BELL (APA-16), FELAND (APA-11) and BELLATRIX (AKA-3). They were escorted from Wellington by destroyers BAILEY (DD-492), FRAZIER (DD-607), GANSEVOORT (DD-608), MEADE (DD-602), RUSSELL (DD-414) and ANDERSON (DD-411).

        For the next few months Wellington continued to be used as a stores base and the floating dock was used continuously for repairs as were facilities in Auckland and occasionally Lyttelton and Port Chalmers. By the end of February 1944 Wellington had nearly returned to normal.

        Abbreviations used to describe ships are:-

        APH Transport fitted for evacuation of wounded

        The island nature of so much of the Pacific war gave rise to a whole array of landing craft. Most of the different types were at Wellington and some at Auckland. The troop carrying vessels ranged from small craft like the LCP or the LVT, which could crawl right up on the beach to the 200 man LCI.

        LVP - Landing Craft - Personnel


        LVT - Landing Vehicle Tracked

        The LCVP was big enough to carry a jeep as well as men, while the LCM and the LCT conveyed bulldozers, medium tanks and heavy trucks ashore.


        LCVP - Landing Craft Vehicle & Personnel

        LCM Landing Craft Mechanised

        All of these vessels were drawfed by the ocean going vessels, the LST and LSD. One of the most effective work horses, the LST carrried everything from troops and tanks to cargo and landing craft. The biggest of all the vessels was the LSD which had space for troops, landing craft up to LCT in size and could double as a repair ship. It is unknown if any LSD's called at New Zealand although the first one built ASHLAND (LSD-1) was on its way to Wellington in 1943 when it was diverted to Efate. It had on board the first Sherman tanks to be used bu the marines in action.


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        Inhoud

        Het vrachtschip meldde zich vervolgens voor dienst bij Commandant Train, Atlantic Fleet. Na een shakedown-training vertrok ze op 4 september uit New York City en vormde ze een koers naar IJsland . Het schip arriveerde op de 16e in Reykjavík en begon passagiers te ontschepen en vracht te lossen. Na voltooiing van deze taak verliet ze de IJslandse wateren op 5 oktober, zeilde in zuidwestelijke richting over de Atlantische Oceaan en arriveerde op de 13e in Charleston, South Carolina . Na een maand van reparaties aan de reis, verhuisde het schip, via Norfolk, Virginia , naar New York City om lading op te nemen en voer op 28 november uit naar de Caraïben . Onder haar aanloophavens tijdens de cruise waren Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Jamaïca San Juan en Vieques , Puerto Rico St. Thomas, Maagdeneilanden Antigua en Trinidad voordat ze op 27 december terugkwam in New York.

        Tijdens de eerste drie maanden van 1942 maakte Alcyone nog twee reizen vanuit New York en Norfolk naar verschillende punten in het Caribisch gebied. Een van haar opdrachten tijdens deze reizen was de evacuatie van burgers van Antigua naar de Verenigde Staten. Op een keer werd haar konvooi aangevallen door Duitse onderzeeërs . Hoewel drie consorten het slachtoffer werden van torpedo-aanvallen, voltooide Alcyone haar reis ongedeerd en kwam op 12 april terug in Charleston, waar ze beschikbaar was.

        Alcyone werd op 1 juni toegewezen aan de Naval Transportation Service en vertrok op 10 juni vanuit Norfolk in een konvooi op weg naar Nieuw-Zeeland met troepen en uitrusting van de 1st Marine Division dat begin augustus op Guadalcanal zou landen . Ze voer op 18 juni door het Panamakanaal , voegde zich bij de Pacifische Vloot en bereikte Wellington op H juli. Na het lossen van haar lading, verhuisde het schip naar Auckland , Nieuw-Zeeland, om materiaal in te nemen voor transport naar geavanceerde bases in de Stille Oceaan .

        Alcyone zeilde op 31 juli onafhankelijk van Auckland en begaf zich naar Nouméa , Nieuw-Caledonië en Espiritu Santo om haar lading te verdelen. Na deze stops arriveerde ze op de 28e in Sydney , Australië en onderging ze reparaties aan de reis. Op 8 september verliet het schip Australië vormde een koers voor de westkust van de Verenigde Staten en bereikte op 29 september San Francisco , Californië. Daarna ging ze naar de Mare Island Navy Yard , Vallejo, Californië, voor ombouw tot een aanvalsvrachtschip. Tijdens de werfwerkzaamheden werden drie 30-tons gieken, een bootreparatiewerkplaats en extra aanlegplaats toegevoegd. Alcyone werd op 26 november opnieuw aangewezen als AKA-7 en werd opnieuw toegewezen aan Amfibische Krachten, Pacific Fleet.

        De verbouwingswerkzaamheden waren begin november voltooid en Alcyone vertrok op de 6e uit San Francisco. Ze was toen betrokken bij amfibische oefeningen en shakedown-trainingen voor San Diego, Californië . Het schip verliet Californië op 21 december en zette koers naar de oostkust van de Verenigde Staten .

        Alcyone keerde op 2 maart terug over het Panamakanaal, kwam op 9 maart aan bij de Charleston Navy Yard en onderging reparaties gedurende een maand voordat hij half april naar Norfolk zeilde. Kort nadat hij Norfolk had bereikt, begon Alcyone aan een periode van trainingsoefeningen in de Chesapeake Bay, die tot begin juni duurde. Ze zeilde met Task Force 65 op de 8e voor de Middellandse Zee . Haar konvooi sloeg onderweg verschillende vijandelijke aanvallen af ​​voordat ze veilig aankwam in Oran , Algerije, op 22 juni. Ze nam deel aan amfibische landingsoefeningen en laadde haar laadruimen ter voorbereiding op de aanstaande aanval op Sicilië .

        Alcyone ging op 5 juli van start arriveerde vijf dagen later in Scoglitti, Sicilië en begon haar lading te lossen ondanks ruwe zee en frequente vijandelijke luchtaanvallen. Ze landde haar uitrusting en troepen met het verlies van slechts een paar kleine boten, verliet het gebied op de 13e en kwam op 16 juli terug in Oran. Van daaruit voer het schip verder naar Norfolk, waar het op 3 augustus aankwam.

        Na een korte periode in de haven voer het aanvalsvrachtschip opnieuw naar de Stille Oceaan. Ze voer op de laatste dag van augustus door het Panamakanaal en stopte in San Francisco voordat ze verder ging naar Hawaï . Alcyone bereikte Pearl Harbor op 30 september en nam in oktober deel aan trainingsoefeningen voor de kust van Maui . Ze begon op 10 november met Task Group (TG) 52.11 om deel te nemen aan de invasie van Makin Island , Gilbert Islands . Op de 20e bereikte het schip het transportgebied van dat eiland en begon met het lossen van haar lading. Leden van haar bemanning hielpen ook andere schepen bij het lossen van hun passagiers en voorraden. Ondanks zware vijandelijke weerstand voltooide Alcyone haar operaties met succes en verliet het gebied op de 24e.

        Na een korte tussenstop in Pearl Harbor, ging Alcyone verder naar San Diego, waar ze op 19 december aankwam. Ze bleef daar tijdens de kerstvakantie.

        Alcyone voer op 13 januari 1944 naar Hawaï. Bij het bereiken van Pearl Harbor maakte het schip de laatste voorbereidingen voor de aanval op Kwajalein . Ze kwam op 22 januari uit Oahu en bereikte op 31 januari het transportgebied bij Kwajalein . Alcyone loste haar lading en hielp ook bij het landen van troepen van andere schepen. Vijandelijke kustbranden en gevaarlijke koraalriffen vertraagden haar operaties enigszins, en Alcyone bleef in het gebied tot half februari.

        Het vrachtschip deed een aanloop naar Pearl Harbor voordat het verder ging naar de kust van Californië. Ze bereikte San Pedro op 26 februari en ging naar een scheepswerf op Terminal Island voor revisie. Een reeks amfibische landingsoefeningen volgde op de voltooiing van het werfwerk en Alcyone verliet de westkust op 18 april, op weg naar Hawaï. Ze bereikte Pearl Harbor en bundelde haar krachten om Guam in de Marianen aan te vallen .

        Het vrachtschip ging op 22 juli voor anker bij dat eiland en begon met lossen. Toen ze deze opdracht had voltooid, begon ze terug te keren naar Hawaï. Ze arriveerde op 10 augustus in Pearl Harbor en ging kort daarna het droogdok in voor kleine reparaties. Het schip ging op 15 september weer van start en voer naar Manus , Admiralty Islands . Na ongeveer een maand van voorbereiding en training voer ze op 14 oktober uit als lid van TG 79.2, dat volgens de planning zou beginnen met de bevrijding van de Filippijnse eilanden .

        De aanvallende troepenmacht bereikte op de 20e de wateren van de stranden van Leyte en begon diezelfde dag met de landingsoperaties . Alcyone loste haar lading terwijl ze vijandelijke luchtaanvallen en mortiervuur ​​van kustbatterijen onderging. Ze voltooide haar losoperaties op de 22e en begaf zich naar Hollandia , Nieuw-Guinea , voor herbevoorrading. Op 14 november voer het schip naar Leyte om het aldaar gevestigde bruggenhoofd te bevoorraden.

        Nadat ze haar lading in Leyte had gelost, trok ze zich terug bij de Admiraliteiten en bereikte Manus op de 24e. Vanaf dat eiland verhuisde ze naar Cape Gloucester , New Britain , om het op te nemen tegen eenheden van de 40th Infantry Division. Het schip bracht deze troepen terug naar Manus, waar ze zich bij TG 79.4 voegde. Op 16 december voer de groep naar de Golf van Huon , Nieuw-Guinea, voor een reeks amfibische landingsoefeningen. Na hun voltooiing keerden de schepen terug naar Manus voor de laatste uitrusting voorafgaand aan de invasie van Luzon , het grootste eiland van de Filippijnen.

        Op de laatste dag van 1944 sorteerde Alcyone met TG 79,4 voor de aanval op de stranden van Lingayen die begon op 9 januari 1945. Het lossen van haar lading werd bemoeilijkt door ruwe zee, Japanse zelfmoordbootaanvallen en vijandelijke luchtaanvallen . Alcyone bleef vijf dagen in het gebied voordat ze klaar was met het legen van haar ruimen. Op de 13e zette ze koers naar Leyte waar ze haar voorraden aanvulde voordat ze op de 29e terugkeerde naar Luzon met een kleine aanvalsmacht voor een landing op Zambales . De aanval was algemene stemmen, en de operaties werden op 31 januari afgerond.

        Alcyone verliet de Filippijnse wateren op 11 februari, op weg naar de Verenigde Staten. Ze deed aanloophavens bij Manus en Pearl Harbor voordat ze op 12 maart San Francisco bereikte. Het schip ging vervolgens de Moore Dry Dock Company , Oakland, Californië binnen voor revisie. Tijdens deze werfperiode werden haar koningsposten vervangen door viervoetige masten, werden haar ligplaatsen voor troepen verwijderd en werden tijdelijke kooien voor vrachtopslag geïnstalleerd.

        Na voltooiing van de werfwerkzaamheden op 2 juni werd het schip toegewezen aan Service Forces, Pacific Fleet. Op de 8e werd Alcyone omgeleid naar Seattle , Washington, om te laden. Ze vertrok op 21 juni uit Seattle en zette koers naar Ulithi . Na daar op 9 juli een korte pauze te hebben gehouden, begon ze aan een ontmoeting met logistieke ondersteuningsschepen die de oorlogsschepen van de Fast Carrier Task Force bevoorraden in de wateren van de Japanse thuiseilanden.

        Alcyone voltooide het lossen op zee op 2 augustus en zette koers naar Guam om aan te vullen. Terwijl het schip in de Marianen was, capituleerde Japan . Alcyone vervoegde de logistieke groep op 23 augustus en drie dagen later gingen zij en haar consorten de baai van Tokio binnen . Na het lossen verliet Alcyone Japan en keerde terug naar Guam om meer vracht en voorraden aan te nemen. Ze kwam op 1 oktober terug in de baai van Tokio en begon met het bevoorraden van schepen van de bezettingstroepen .

        Alcyone bleef tot begin maart 1946 in Japanse wateren. Ze vervoerde voorraden en uitrusting tussen de havens van Yokosuka , Ominato , Aomori , Otaru , Wakayama , Sasebo en Kure . Het schip vertrok op 11 maart uit Yokosuka en keerde terug naar de Verenigde Staten. Ze arriveerde op 29 maart in San Francisco en begon aan een periode van onderhoud. Op 15 mei voer het schip door naar San Diego waar het twee weken bleef. Alcyone zeilde verder naar het zuiden en voer op 9 juni door het Panamakanaal. Vijf dagen later maakte ze de haven in Norfolk, Virginia.

        De voorbereidingen om het schip te deactiveren begonnen al snel. Alcyone werd op 23 juli 1946 buiten dienst gesteld bij de Norfolk Navy Yard , Portsmouth, Virginia en werd op 24 juli 1946 overgedragen aan de War Shipping Administration voor verwijdering. Haar naam werd op 15 augustus 1946 van de marinelijst geschrapt.

        Het schip werd op 17 maart 1947 verkocht aan de Johnson Line en omgebouwd voor dienst als het koopvaardijschip Star Alcyone en later gesloopt in 1969.

        Alcyone verdiende acht strijdsterren voor haar dienst in de Tweede Wereldoorlog .


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        US Landing ships

        10717 ts, IJ,O,GD: 18004, GM,T: 18300, NO: 17706, I: 17515 tp 184,0×25,6/31,7×7,62/7,93 m 1 TPm Westinghouse (T: De Laval, I: General Electric), 2 k Combustion Engineering (GM: Babcock & Wilcox), 22000 KM, 1 śr, 23,5 w tr, 10000/20 8×76/50pl2 Mk 22, 20 śm. HUS-1 lub 9 śm. HR2S, 1999 ż., 900 tł pl ..×31,7 m, ph 70,1×.. m, 2 podn., 1500 tpl rdn SPS-10, rdp SPS-12, 4 ra Mk 34, snl SPN-35, swe URL-5 z. 609/667. 196.: 19 śm. Sea Knight lub 11 śm. Sea Stallion. O 1970: 1×8 wpkpl Sea Sparrow (..). T,I 1972, O,IJ,NO 1973, GD,GM 1974: 2×8 wpkpl Sea Sparrow (..), 4×76/50pl2 8×6 wcp Mk 36 SRBOC, 1 ppt SLQ-25 rn SPS-64, rodz SPS-65, rdn SPS-67, rdp SPS-40, ra Mk 115, swe SLQ-32 z. 609. 1982: dod. 2×20/536pr Phalanx, 4 kmpl. z. 650. 198.: 76pl à 2×25pl Mk 38 Bushmaster. I 5.96: 19780 tp zan. 9,14 m 21 w 4×25pl Mk 38 Bushmaster, 2×20/536pr Phalanx, 4×12,7pl, 10 śm. (8 MH-53E, 2 UH-46) z. 680+652.

        IWO JIMA/LPH 2 (2.4.59/17.9.60/26.8.61 PF 7.62: TF 8 10-12.62 Kuba 30.8.63: 7 F 11.63-4.64, 5-10.65, 6.66-6.67 Wietnam 1.7.67: 1 esk. OD, PF mod. 73 3.3.75 z‡ am. ODD „Nashville”/LPD 13 11.90-3.91 Kuwejt @ 14.7.93 § 24.9.93 §§ 18.12.95-11.96 Brownsville)

        OKINAWA/LPH 3 (1.4.60/14.8.61/14.4.62 AF 10-12.62 Kuba 24.1.67: PF 3-12.67, 11.68-6.69 Wietnam mod. 70 mod. 73 11.90-3.91 Kuwejt @ 17.12.92 § 18.8.00 †6.6.02, u wybrz. Kaliforni 31°27,0'N 119°42,6'W, jako cel, am. okr., sam. i OP „Portsmouth”/SSN 707, pkpo Maverick, Harpoon, bl, 1t)

        GUADALCANAL/LPH 7 (1.9.61/16.3.63/20.7.63 12 esk. OD, AF mod. 74 11.90-3.91 Kuwejt @ 31.8.94 § 16.3.01)

        GUAM/LPH 9 (15.11.62/22.8.64/16.1.65 12 esk. OD, AF 12.12.66: 8 esk. OD mod. 71-72 10.83 Grenada 11.90-3.91 Kuwejt @ 25.8.98 § 14.12.00 †16.10.01, 316 Mm na ESE od prz. Lookout 31°14,2'N 071°16,5'W, jako cel, am. okr. i sam., pkpo Hellfire, HARM, Harpoon i t)

        TRIPOLI/LPH 10 (15.6.64/31.7.65/6.8.66 PF 5-12.67, 7.68-3.69, 11.69-2.70, 3-6.70, 4-8.71, 4-10.73 Wietnam mod. 72 25.11.77: 7 F 1-3.91 Kuwejt ‡18.2.91, Zat. Perska, 1 mina napr. .. 12.93-94 Somali @ 8.9.95 § 15.8.95 26.6.97: OE, USArmy)

        NEW ORLEANS/LPH 11 (1.3.66/3.2.68/16.11.68 PF 8.69-5.70, 7.72-4.73 Wietnam 8.70: 1 F 17.7.72: 3 esk. OD mod. 73 12.90-8.91 Kuwejt 12.93-94 Somali @ 31.10.97 § 23.12.97 ?)

        INCHON/LPH 12, 96: MCS 12 (8.4.68/24.5.69/20.6.70 AF mod. 72 z‡16.12.75, W wybrz. Włoch, am. ZR „Caloosahatchee”/AO 98 napr. .. z‡3.80, Atl., am. OD „Spiegel Grove”/LSD 32 napr. .. 11.90-3.91 Kuwejt mod. 6.3.95-24.5.96: OBTR @ 20.2.02 § 20.6.02 ?)

        9773 ts, 13736 tp 186,0×24,4×6,6 m 2 TG General Electric, 45000 KM, 1 śr, 26 w tr, / 2×20/536pr Phalanx, 3 sam. Harrier, 14 śm. r3D SPS-52 z. 700.

        8 okrętów (proj. 1975 nie zam.)

        Landing helicopters & amphibious

        25120 ts, 39967 tp 254,2×32,5/38,4×7,9/8,38 m 2 TPm Westinghouse, 2 k Combustion Engineering, 70000 KM, 2 śr, 24 w tr, 10000/20 2(S: 1)×8 wpkpl Sea Sparrow (..), 4×127/54pl Mk 45, 6×20pl Mk 67, 8×12,7pl, 30+12 śm. Sea Knight lub 19+9 śm. Sea Stallion, 4×6 wcp SRBOC Mk 36, 1 ppt SLQ-25, . ppt SLQ-49 4 LCU lub 2 LCU, 3 LCM(8) lub 17 LCM(6) lub 1 LCAC 1 bpm (1903 ż, 5 cz, 8 wpkpl) pl 250,0×32,3 m, ph 80,8×23,8 m, 2 podn., dok 81,7×23,8 m rn SPS-10F, r3D SPS-52B, rdn SPS-67, rdp SPS-40B, ra SPG-53, rnrpl SPQ-9, swe SLQ-32V z. 892. 1991: wpkpl à 2×20/536pr Phalanx rn SPS-64. 1992/94: 2×127pl, dod. 2×21 wpkpl RIM-116A (..) ra Mk 23. 1994/. SPS-52B à r3D SPS-48E z. 930.

        TARAWA/LHA 1 (15.11.71/1.12.73/29.5.76 PF 11.90-3.91 Kuwejt 3-4.03 Irak)

        SAIPAN/LHA 2 (21.7.72/18.7.74/15.10.77 AF rem. 8.82-7.83 9.83 Grenada rem. 10.85-2.86 9.91-3.92 Kuwejt 3-4.03 Irak)

        BELLEAU WOOD/LHA 3 (5.3.73/11.4.77/23.9.78 ex „Philippine Sea” PF rem. 8.84-7.85 rem. 90 1-2.95 Somali)

        NASSAU/LHA 4 (13.8.73/21.1.78/28.7.79 ex „Leyte Gulf” AF 11.90-3.91 Kuwejt 3-4.03 Irak)

        PELELIU/LHA 5 (12.11.76/25.11.78/3.5.80 15.2.78 ex „Da Nang”, ex „Khe San” PF 11.01/02 Afganistan)

        bez nazw/LHA 6-LHA 9 (zam. an. 20.1.71)

        20116 ts, 29130 tp 218,6×54,3×7,7 m 4 TG General Electric, 90000 KM, 2 śr, 30 w tr, / 2×4 wpkpo Harpoon (.), 2×20/536pr Phalanx, 4 sam. Harrier, 16 śm. SH-53, 6 LAMPS r3D SPS-52 z. 959+628.

        1? okręt (proj. 1979 nie zam.)

        28233 ts, 41133 tp 257,3/237,1×32,3/42,7×8,13 m 2 TPm Westinghouse, 2 k Combustion Engineering, 77000 KM, 2 śr, 24 w 6200 tr, 9500/20 2×8 wpkpl Sea Sparrow (..), 3×20/536pr Phalanx, 8×12,7pl, 6 sam. Harrier, 32 śm. Sea Knight lub 20 sam. Harrier, 6 śm. Sea Hawk, 4/6×6 wcp Mk 36, 1 ppt SLQ-25 3 LCAC lub 12 LCM(6) lub 8 LCM(8), 4 LCPL, 1873 ż pl 249,6×32,3 m, ph . ×25,9 m, 2 podn., 1232 tpl, dok 81,4×15,2 m rn SPS-64, r3D SPS-48E (W: SPS-52C), rdn SPS-67, rdp SPS-49, Mk 23 TAS, 2 rnrpl Mk 57, snl SPN-35, SPN-43, SPN-47 z. 1080.

        WASP/LHD 1 (30.5.85/4.8.87/29.7.89 AF)

        ESSEX/LHD 2 (20.3.89/4.1.91/17.10.92 PF)

        KEARSARGE/LHD 3 (6.2.90/26.3.92/16.10.93 AF 9-11.01 Afganistan 3-4.03 Irak)

        BOXER/LHD 4 (8.4.91/13.8.93/11.2.95 PF 3-4.03 Irak)

        BATAAN/LHD 5 (22.6.94/.3.96/.5.97 8 dyw. amfibijny 11.01/02 Afganistan 3-4.03 Irak)

        BONHOMME RICHARD/LHD 6 (18.4.95/.3.97/.5.98 3-4.03 Irak)

        IWO JIMA/LHD 7 (../../15.3.01 ex „Hornet”)

        jw., lecz: 2 TGe General Electric, 70000 KM, 2+2 SE, +1360 KM, 23/12 w.

        ts, 36450 tp 253,2×31,8× m 2 TPm, 2 k, 140000 KM, 2 śr, 20+ w tr, / 2×. wpkpl ESSM (..), 3×20/536pr Phalanx, 8×12,7pl, 20 sam. Harrier, 42 śm. Sea Knight, 1894 ż z. 1108.

        TD Typ „Arcturus” (1939-41, 194.-4.) kadłub „C2”

        6190 ts, 13760 tp 139,9×19,2×7,85 m 1 SD., 6000 KM, 1 śr, 15,5 w 1202 tr, 18000/14 1×127/38pl, 8×40/56pl2 Bofors, 28×20/70pl2 Oerlikon, 10 LCVP, 8 LCM(3), 5120 tł z. .

        ARCTURUS/AK 18, . AKA 1 (../18.5.39/.. ex m/s „Mormachawk”)

        PROCYON/AK 19, . AKA 2 (../14.11.40/.. ex m/s „Sweepstakes”)

        BELLATRIX/AK 20, . AKA 3 (../..41/.. ex m/s „Raven” . per. „Independencia” ? 90/94)

        ELECTRA/AK 21, . AKA 4 (../..41/.. ex m/s „Meteor” 11.42 Afr. Płn. ‡15.11.42, Afr. Płn. 34°00'N 007°24'W, „U 173”, . t)

        ALCHIBA/AK 23, . AKA 6 (../6.7.39/.. ex m/s „Mormacdove” TG 62.18.42 8.42 Guadalcanal)

        ALCYONE/AK 24, . AKA 7 (../..39/.. ex m/s „Mormacgull”)

        ALGORAB/AK 25, . AKA 8 (../15.6.39/.. ex m/s „Mormacwren”)

        BETELGEUSE/AK 28, . AKA 11 (../18.9.39/.. ex m/s „Mormaclark”)

        ts, 11053 tp 125,6×18,6×7,2 m . SD., 4000 KM, 1 śr, 15 w 1256 tr, / 1×127/38pl, 4×76/50pl, 2×40/56pl Bofors, 10×20/70pl Oerlikon, 4118 tł z. .

        FOMALHAUT/AK 22, . AKA 5 (../25.1.41/..41 ex m/s „Cape Lookout”)

        ts, 15085 tp 146,3×20,1×8,2 m . TPm, . k, 6300 KM, 1 śr, 18 w 1807 tr, / 1×127/38pl, 8×40/56pl2 Bofors, 28×20/70pl2 Oerlikon, 8 LCM(3), 10 LCVP, 6084 tł z. .

        ALHENA/AK 26, . AKA 9 (../18.1.41/..41 ex ts/s „Robin Kettering”)

        TD Typ „Almaack” (1940) kadłub „C3-E”

        ts, 14895 tp, 6200 BRT 144,2×20,1×8,23 m . TPm, . k, 8800 KM, 1 śr, 18 w 1888 tr, / 1×127/38pl, 4×76/50pl, 28×20/70pl2 Oerlikon, .. LCVP, . LCM(3), . LCP(L), 4700 tł z. .

        ALMAACK/AK 27, . AKA 10 (../..40/.. ex ts/s „Executor” 11.42 Afr. Płn. ‡14.11.42, Afr. Płn. 36°19'N 007°52'W, „U 155”, . t)

        TD ex N Typ „Caldwell” (1917, 1940)

        TD ex N Typ „Little” (1918, 1940-43)

        TD Typ „Libra” (1941-42) kadłub „C2”

        ts, 13875 tp, 6085 BRT 139,9×19,2×7,85 m . TPm, . k, 6000 KM, 1 śr, 16 w 1135 tr, / 1×127/38pl, 4×76/50pl lub 8×40/56pl2 Bofors, 28×20/70pl2 Oerlikon, 10 LCVP, 8 LCM(3), 4800 tł z. .

        LIBRA/AK 53, . AKA 12 (../..41/.. ex ts/s „Jean Lykes” 6.43 Rendova)

        TITANIA/AK 55, . AKA 13 (../28.2.42/.. ex ts/s „Harry Culbreath”)

        OBERON/AK 56, . AKA 14 (../18.3.42/.. ex ts/s „Dalalba”)

        TD Typ „Harris” (1920-22, 1940-4.)

        Attack Transports. Zm. sygnatur 1.2.43.

        10000 ts, 21640 tk, 22250 tp 163,1×21,95×9,30/9,53 m 2 TPm Curtis, 8 k Yarrow lub Babcock & Wilcox, 12000 KM, 2 śr, 17,5 w 4520 tr, / 4×76/50pl, H: 4×40/56pl2 Bofors, 10×20/70pl Oerlikon Z: 6×40pl1×4,1×2, 20×20pl2 LW: 4×40pl2, 16×20pl 22 LCVP, 2-4 LCM(3), 3991 tł, 1650-1900 ż z. 693.

        HARRIS/AP 8 à APA 2 (../19.3.21 ex „President Grant”, ex ts/s „Pine Tree State” ws. 18.9.40 @ 16.4.46 §§ 20.7.48)

        ZEILIN/AP 9 à APA 3 (../11.12.20 ex „President Jackson”, ex ts/s „Silver State” ws. 3.1.42 ‡13.1.45, zat. Lingayen, kam. @ 19.4.46 § 5.6.46)

        LEONARD WOOD/AP 25 à APA 12 (../19.9.21 ex „Western World”, ex ts/s „Nutmeg State” ws. 10.6.41 AF 11.42 Afr. Płn. @ 22.3.46 §§ 20.6.48)

        HUNTER LIGGETT/AP 27 à APA 14 (../..22 ex „Pan America”, ex ts/s „Palmetto State” TG 62.18.42 8.42 Guadalcanal)

        TASKER H. BLISS/AP 42 (../.. ex „President Cleveland” †12.11.42, reda Fedala 33°40'N 007°35'W, „U 130”, . t)

        HUGH L. SCOTT/AP 43 (../.. ex „President Pierce” †12.11.42, reda Fedala 33°40'N 007°35'W, „U 130”, . t)

        Attack Transports. Zm. sygnatur 1.2.43.

        ts, 6720 tp 126,3×17,1×5,64 m 2 TPm Westinghouse, 2 k Babcock & Wilcox, 8000 KM, 2 śr, 19 w 1772 tr, / 4×76/50pl, 4×40/56pl2 Bofors, 8×20/70pl Oerlikon, 16 LCVP, 1100 ż z. 472.

        FELAND/AP 18 à APA 11 (../10.11.42/..)

        TD Typ „McCawley” (1927-28, 1940)

        Attack Transport. Zm. sygnatur 1.2.43.

        9900 ts, 13800 tp, 7712 BRT 148,3×19,4×7,78 m 2 SD. Sulzer, 8000 KM, 2 śr, 16 w 1100 tr, / 1×127/38pl, 4×76/50pl, 4×40/56pl2 Bofors, 18×20/70pl Oerlikon, 25 LCVP, 2 LCM(3), 1400 ż z. 197.

        McCAWLEY/AP 10 à APA 4 (../8.12.27 ex ts/s „Santa Barbara” ws. 11.9.40 AF 4.42: PF 8.42: TG 62.1 8.42 Guadalcanal 6.43 Rendova †30.6.43, koło Rendovy, jap. sam. i pomyłk. am. ŚT, 1 tl, 2 t, 15†)

        BARNETT/AP 11 à APA 5 (../..28 ex m/s „Santa Clara” TG 62.18.42 8.42 Guadalcanal)

        TD Typ „Heywood” (1918-19, 194.-4.)

        Attack Transports. Zm. sygnatur 1.2.43.

        ts, 13525 tp, 8378 BRT 154,5×17,1×7,70 m 1 TPm, . k, 9500 KM, 1 śr, 16 w 1905 tr, / 4×76/50pl, 4×40/56pl2 Bofors, 16×20/70pl2 Oerlikon, 19 LCVP, 4 LCM(3), 1621 tł, 1150 ż z. .

        HEYWOOD/AP 12 à APA 6 (../..19 ex ts/s „City of Baltimore”, ex „Steadfast”)

        GEORGE F. ELLIOT/AP 13 (../.. ex ts/s „?” TG 62.18.42 8.42 Guadalcanal †8.8.42, koło Guadalcanal, 1 kam., 45†)

        FULLER/AP 14 à APA 7 (../..19 ex ts/s „City of Newport News”, ex „Archer” TG 62.18.42 8.42 Guadalcanal)

        WILLIAM P. BIDDLE/AP 15 à APA 8 (../..19 ex ts/s „City of San Francisco”, ex „City of Hamburg”, ex „Eclipse”)

        NEVILLE/AP 16 à APA 9 (../..18 ex ts/s „City of Norfolk”, ex „Independence”)

        TD Typ „Harry Lee” (1931, 194.)

        ts, 15460 tp, 9359 BRT 144,5×18,8×8,69 m 1 TPm, . k, 8000 KM, 1 śr, 16 w 1720 tr, / 4×76/50pl, 4×40/56pl2 Bofors, 18×20/70pl Oerlikon, 15 LCVP, 2 LCM(3), 1000 ż z. .

        HARRY LEE/AP 17, 1.2.43: APA 10 (../..31 ex ts/s „Exochorda”)

        TD Typ „Dickman” (1920-21, 194.-4.)

        Attack Transports. Zm. sygnatur 1.2.43.

        10000 ts, 21300 tp 163,1×22,05×9,22 m 4 TPm Bethlehem, 8 k, 10000 KM, 2 śr, 16,7 w 4449 tr, / 4×76/50pl, 6×40/56pl1×4,1×2 Bofors, 20×20/70pl2 Oerlikon, 33 LCVP, 2-4 LCM(3), 3991 tł, 1650-1900 ż z. 693. HTA 1945: 4×76pl, 4×40pl2, 10×20pl.

        JOSEPH T. DICKMAN/AP 26 à APA 13 (../..22 ex „President Roosevelt”, ex ts/s „Peninsula State” 11.42 Afr. Płn.)

        HENRY T. ALLEN/AP 30 à APA 15, 45: AG 90 (../.. ex „President Jefferson” 45: JP)

        J. FRANKLIN BELL/AP 34 à APA 16 (../..21 ex „President McKinley”, ex ts/s „American Mail”)

        AMERICAN LEGION/AP 35 à APA 17 (../..20 ex ts/s bzn TG 62.18.42 8.42 Guadalcanal)

        TD Typ „President Jackson” (194.-4.) kadłub „C3-A” i „C3-P”

        Attack Transports. Zm. sygnatur 1.2.43.

        ts, 16744 tp 149,65×21,2×8,08 m 1 TPm, 2 k Foster-Wheeler, 8500 KM, 1 śr, 18,9 w 1700 (*1650) tr, 11000/15 4×76/50pl, 4×40/56pl2 Bofors, 14×20/70pl Oerlikon (*10×20pl), 31-32 (*25) LCVP, 2 LCM(3), 1550 (*1500) ż z. .

        PRESIDENT JACKSON/AP 37 à APA 18 (../..40/.. )

        PRESIDENT ADAMS/AP 38 à APA 19 (../..41/.. TG 62.18.42 8.42 Guadalcanal)

        PRESIDENT HAYES/AP 39 à APA 20 (../..40/.. )

        ARTHUR MIDDLETON/AP 55* à APA 25 (../28.6.41/7.6.42 ex „African Comet”, ex „American Banker” @ 21.10.46 § 1.10.58)

        SAMUEL CHASE/AP 56* à APA 26 (../23.8.41/13.6.42 ex „African Meteor”, ex „American Shipper” AF 11.42 Afr. Płn. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 8.44 Płd. Fr. . PF 4.45 Okinawa ‡20.5.45, rej. Okinawy, kam. @ 26.2.47 § 1.10.58)

        GEORGE CLYMER/AP 57* à APA 27 (../27.9.41/15.6.42 ex „African Planet”, ex „American Farmer” AF 11.42 Afr. Płn. 1.43: PF 2-12.43 W. Salomona 7.44 Guam 10.44 Leyte 1.45 Lingayen 4.45 Okinawa 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TG 1.3 1-7.48 Chiny 50-53 Korea 64-65 Wietnam @ 31.10.67 § 1.11.67)

        THOMAS STONE/AP 59 à APA 29 (../../.. 11.42 Afr. Płn. †7.11.42, 150 Mm na NW od Algieru, „U 205”, 1 t)

        THOMAS JEFFERSON/AP 60 à APA 30 (../..41/.. ex „President Garfield” 11.42 Afr. Płn.)

        TD Typ „Crescent City” (194.-4.) kadłub „C3-Delta”

        Attack Transports. Zm. sygnatur 1.2.43.

        ts, 14475 tp, 8000 BRT 149,7×20,0×7,82 m 1 TPm General Electric, 2 k Babcock & Wilcox, 8600 KM, 1 śr, 17 w 1935 tr, 15000/15 1×127/38pl, 4(*3)×76/50pl, 4×40/56pl2 Bofors, 11×20/70pl Oerlikon ChC: 4×40pl2, 18×20pl, bez 127pl M: 3×40pl1×2,1×1, 22×20pl2 C: 4×40pl2, 8×20pl2 26-30 LCVP, 2 LCM(3), 1200 ż z. 558-622. M 19. 2×40pl2, bez 20pl rdp SPS-40, rdn SPS-10B, swe WLR-1.

        CRESCENT CITY/AP 40 à APA 21 (../..40/.. ex ts/s „Del Orleans”)

        JOSEPH HEWES/AP .. à APA 22 (../../.. 11.42 Afr. Płn. †11.11.42, reda Fedala 33°40'N 007°20'W, „U 173”, . t czy ten typ ?)

        JOHN PENN/AP 51 à APA 23 (../.. † czy ten typ ?)

        EDWARD RUTLEDGE/AP .. à APA 24 (../../.. †12.11.42, reda Fedala 33°40'N 007°35'W, „U 130”, . t czy ten typ ?)

        CHARLES CARROLL/AP 58 à APA 28 (../24.3.42/13.10.42 ex ts/s „Del Uruguay” @ 27.12.46 § 29.10.58)

        MONROVIA/AP 64 à APA 31 (../19.9.42/1.12.42 ex ts/s „Del Argentino” AF 7.43 Sycylia J.43: PF 2.44 Kwajalein 6.44 Saipan 7.44 Guam 10.44 Leyte 1.45 Lingayen 4.45 Okinawa @ 26.2.47 30.11.50: AF 58 Liban 62 Kuba 64 Panama @ 31.10.68 § 1.11.68)

        CALVERT/AP 65 à APA 32* (../19.9.42/1.10.42 ex ts/s „Del Orleans” @ 26.2.47 § 1.8.66)

        TDàODS Typ „Ancon” (1938, 1942) ex JMH

        10105 ts, 14376 tp, 10021 BRT 150,3×19,5×8,08 m 1 TPm Bethlehem, 2 k Yarrow, 9000 KM, 1 śr, 19 w 1582 tr, 10852/15 2×127/38pl Mk 12, 8×40/56pl2 Bofors, 14×20/70pl Oerlikon Mk 4 6 LCVP, 4 LCPL, 2 LCPR, 2 LCC, 195 ż, 44 tr rdp SK, rdn SG z. 638.

        ANCON/AP 66, 26.2.43: AGC 4 (../24.9.38/.. 11.1.42 ex ts/s bzn JA 12.8.42: USN 11.42 Afr. Płn. przeb. 16.2-21.4.43: ODS 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 4.45 Okinawa 25.2.46: zwrot § 17.4.46)

        Landing Crafts, Infantry (Large)

        Zm. sygnatur .. (LCILàLSIL) i 7.2.55 (AMCUàMHC)

        194 ts, 387 tp 48,3×7,2×0,81d/1,52r/1,62d/1,80r m 2 SD. General Motors, 2320 KM, 2 śr, 15,5 w 130 tr, 4000/12 4×20/70pl Oerlikon, 188 ż lub 75 tł z. 24.

        LCI(M) (Mortar): 1×40/56pl Bofors, 3×105m.

        LCI(R) (Rocket): 1×40pl, 6 wpr 127.

        LCI(G) (Gun): 3×40pl, 4×20pl, ?×12,7pl, 10 wpr . *2×40pl, 4×20pl, 6×12,7pl, 10 wpr . **3×40pl, 2×20pl, 5×12,7pl, 8 wpr . ***2×40pl, 3×20pl, 6×12,7pl, 10 wpr . ****1×76/50pl, 1×40pl, 4×20pl, 6×12,7pl, ? wpr .

        LCI(L) 2-LCI(L) 19 à LSIL 2-LSIL 19 (../../..)

        LCI(G) 21-LCI(G) 24**** à? LSIL 21-LSIL 24 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 25-LCI(L) 31 à LSIL 25-LSIL 31 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 33-LCI(L) 66 à LSIL 33-LSIL 66 (../../..)

        LCI(G) 67-LCI(G) 69**** à? LSIL 67-LSIL 69 (../../..)

        LCI(G) 70**** à? LSIL 70 (../../.. ‡5.1.45, kam.)

        LCI(L) 71-LCI(L) 76 à LSIL 71-LSIL 76 (../../..)

        LCI(G) 77-LCI(G) 81*** à? LSIL 77-LSIL 81 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 86-LCI(L) 90 à LSIL 86-LSIL 90 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 94-LCI(L) 218 à LSIL 94-LSIL 218 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 220-LCI(L) 231 à LSIL 220-LSIL 231 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 233 à LSIL 233 (../../.. 19.2.54: tajw. „Lien Chu” § 70/75)

        LCI(L) 234-LCI(L) 262 à LSIL 234-LSIL 262 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 263 à LSIL 263 (../../.. 9.43 Salerno)

        LCI(L) 264-LCI(L) 326 à LSIL 264-LSIL 326 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 327 à LSIL 327 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LCI(L) 329 à LSIL 329 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LCI(L) 330-LCI(L) 338 à LSIL 330-LSIL 338 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 340-LCI(L) 344 à LSIL 340-LSIL 344 (../../..)

        LCI(G) 345-LCI(G) 348*** à? LSIL 345-LSIL 348 (../../..)

        jw., lecz: 209 ts, 387 tp zan. 0,86d/1,60r/1,73 m 110 tr, 8000/12 5×20pl, 205 ż, 32 tł z. 28.

        AMc(U): 260 ts, 387 (10,11: 393) tp 48,5(10,11: 47,8)×7,2×1,73 m 1800 KM, 14 w 2×20pl. z. 34.

        LCI(L) 351-LCI(L) 364 à LSIL 351-LSIL 364 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 367, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 367 (../../.. PF 4 fl. LCI, 11 gr. desant. 1.45 Lingayen 5-6.45 Okinawa 9-11.45 Jap. sprz. 28.2.51: ??)

        LCI(L) 368, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 368 (../../.. PF 5-6.44 Okinawa 9-11.45 Jap. § 28.8.48)

        LCI(L) 369, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 369 (../../.. PF 9-10.45 Jap. sprz. 10.10.46: ??)

        LCI(L) 370, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 370 (../../.. PF 16 fl. LCIR 4-6.45 Okinawa 9.45 Jap. 10-12.45 Chiny § 9.3.48)

        LCI(L) 374-LCI(L) 395 à LSIL 374-LSIL 395 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 397-LCI(L) 398 à LSIL 397-LSIL 398 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 399, 15.7.45: LC(FF) 399 (../../.. PF 9-12.45 Jap. k‡10.45, tajfun § 16.12.45)

        LCI(L) 400-LCI(L) 406 à LSIL 400-LSIL 406 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 407 à LSIL 407 (../../.. ‡16.4.45, rej. Okinawy, kam.)

        LCI(L) 408-LCI(L) 415 à LSIL 408-LSIL 415 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 417 à LSIL 417 (../../.. 19.2.54: tajw. „Lien Li” § 70/75)

        LCI(L) 418 à LSIL 418 (../../.. 19.2.54: tajw. „Lien Sheng” § 70/75)

        LCI(L) 420 (../../.. 50: hol. „Zeearend” 51: indon. „Piru” § 1974)

        LCI(L) 421-LCI(L) 422 à LSIL 421-LSIL 422 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 423, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 423 (../../.. PF 9-12.45 Jap. § 15.6.46)

        LCI(L) 424, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 424 (../../.. PF § 15.8.46)

        LCI(L) 425, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 425 (../../.. PF 2.45 Iwo Jima 4.45 Okinawa § 1.11.47)

        LCI(L) 426, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 426 (../../.. PF § 28.8.46)

        LCI(L) 427, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 427 (../../.. PF § 31.7.46)

        LCI(L) 428-LCI(L) 436 à LSIL 428-LSIL 436 (../../..)

        LCI(G) 437-LCI(G) 442** à? LSIL 437-LSIL 442 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 443-LCI(L) 448 à LSIL 443-LSIL 448 (../../..)

        LCI(G) 449-LCI(G) 453* à? LSIL 449-LSIL 453 (../../..)

        LCI(G) 458-LCI(G) 466 à? LSIL 458-LSIL 466 (../../..)

        LCI(G) 467 (../../.. 50: hol. „Tropenvogel” 51: indon. „Amahai” § 1974)

        LCI(G) 469-LCI(G) 473 à? LSIL 469-LSIL 473 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 476-LCI(L) 483 à LSIL 476-LSIL 483 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 484, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 484 (../../.. PF 5-6.45 Okinawa § 4.2.47)

        LCI(L) 485, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 485 (../../23.10.43 PF @ 20.7.46)

        LCI(L) 486, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 486 (../../.. PF § 2.11.46)

        LCI(L) 487-LCI(L) 496 à LSIL 487-LSIL 496 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 498-LCI(L) 502 à LSIL 498-LSIL 502 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 503, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 503 (../../.. PF § 12.2.48)

        LCI(L) 504-LCI(L) 514 à LSIL 504-LSIL 514 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 515, 10.3.45: AMc(U) 11, 1.55: BLACKBIRD à MHC 11 (../../.. . NM)

        LCI(L) 516-LCI(L) 530 à LSIL 516-LSIL 530 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 531, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 531 (../../.. PF sprz. 24.10.47: ??)

        LCI(L) 532, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 532 (../../.. PF 4-6.45 Okinawa § 30.1.48)

        LCI(L) 533, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 533 (../../.. PF § 31.7.46)

        LCI(L) 535, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 535 (../../.. PF 4-6.45 Okinawa § 8.8.56)

        LCI(L) 536, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 536 (../../19.2.44 PF § 5.6.46)

        LCI(L) 537-LCI(L) 548 à LSIL 537-LSIL 548 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 549 à LSIL 549 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LCI(L) 550-LCI(L) 552 à LSIL 550-LSIL 552 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 554-LCI(L) 567 à LSIL 554-LSIL 567 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 568 à LSIL 568 (../../.. ‡2.4.45, rej. Okinawy, kam.)

        LCI(L) 569, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 569 (../../.. PF § 31.7.46)

        LCI(L) 571, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 571 (../../.. PF § 23.6.46)

        LCI(L) 572, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 572 (../../.. PF 7.45 Mindanao § 28.3.46)

        LCI(L) 573-LCI(L) 574 à LSIL 573-LSIL 574 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 575, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 575 (../../.. PF 1-3.46 Chiny § 17.11.55)

        LCI(L) 576-LCI(L) 579 à LSIL 576-LSIL 579 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 580 à LSIL 580 (../../.. ‡28.4.45, rej. Okinawy, kam.)

        LCI(L) 581-LCI(L) 587 à LSIL 581-LSIL 587 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 588 (../../.. 50: hol. „Stormvogel” 51: indon. „Namlea” 61: JP)

        LCI(L) 589-LCI(L) 599 à LSIL 589-LSIL 599 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 601-LCI(L) 617 à LSIL 601-LSIL 617 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 618, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 618 (../../27.5.44 PF 22 fl. LCI 1.45 Lingayen 4.45 Mindanao 9-12.45 Chiny § 19.6.46)

        LCI(L) 619-LCI(L) 626 à LSIL 619-LSIL 626 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 627, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 627 (../../.. PF 3 fl. LCI 2.45 Iwo Jima 4-6.45 Okinawa § 7.8.56)

        LCI(L) 628, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 628 (../../.. PF 2.45 Iwo Jima 4.45 Okinawa § 4.8.56)

        LCI(L) 629-LCI(L) 651 à LSIL 629-LSIL 651 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 652 à LSIL 652, 52: ACCENTOR/AMCU 15, 1.7.54: LSIL 652 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 653 à LSIL 653, 52: AVOCET/AMCU 16 à MHC 16 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 654 à LSIL 654, 52: BLUE JAY/AMCU 17 à MHC 17 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 656, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 656 (../../.. PF § 17.11.55)

        LCI(L) 657, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 657 (../../.. PF 14 fl. LCI 4-6.45 Okinawa § 31.7.46)

        LCI(L) 658-LCI(L) 669 à LSIL 658-LSIL 669 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 671-LCI(L) 678 à LSIL 671-LSIL 678 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 679, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 679 (../../.. PF 2.45 Iwo Jima 4-6.45 Okinawa § 17.11.55)

        LCI(L) 680-LCI(L) 683 à LSIL 680-LSIL 683 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 685-LCI(L) 693 à LSIL 685-LSIL 693 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 694 à LSIL 694, 52: CHAFFINCH/AMCU 18 à MHC 18 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 695-LCI(L) 697 à LSIL 695-LSIL 697 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 698 à LSIL 698 (../../.. 51/53: fr. „L 9029” 56: wiet. „Long Dao”)

        LCI(L) 699 à LSIL 699 (../../.. 51/53: fr. „L 9034” 56: wiet. „Loi Cong” 75: fil. „Camarines Norte” § 80/89)

        LCI(L) 701 à LSIL 701, 52: CHEWINK/AMCU 19 à MHC 19 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 702 à LSIL 702 (../../.. 51/53: fr. „L 9035” 56: wiet. „Than Tien”)

        LCI(L) 703 à LSIL 703, 52: CHIMANGO/AMCU 20 à MHC 20 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 704-LCI(L) 708 à LSIL 704-LSIL 708 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 709 à LSIL 709, 52: COCKATOO/AMCU 21 à MHC 21 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 710 à LSIL 710 (../../.. 12.58: irań. „Larak” § 197.)

        LCI(L) 711-LCI(L) 738 à LSIL 711-LSIL 738 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 740-LCI(L) 767 à LSIL 740-LSIL 767 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 768 à LSIL 768 (../../.. 53: fr. „L 9037” 57: irań. „Hengam” § 197.)

        LCI(L) 769-LCI(L) 774 à LSIL 769-LSIL 774 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 775, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 775 (../../.. PF 1.45 Lingayen 4-6.45 Okinawa § 19.11.55)

        LCI(L) 776 à LSIL 776, 52: COTINGA/AMCU 22 à MHC 22 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 777 à LSIL 777, 52: DUNLIN/AMCU 23, 1.7.54: LSIL 777 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 778-LCI(L) 781 à LSIL 778-LSIL 781 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 782, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 782 (../../.. PF 4-6.45 Okinawa § 17.11.55)

        LCI(L) 783, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 783 (../../.. PF 4-6.45 Okinawa § 24.4.51)

        LCI(L) 784-LCI(L) 785 à LSIL 784-LSIL 785 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 786, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 786 (../../.. PF 4-6.45 Okinawa § 27.2.51)

        LCI(L) 788, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 788 (../../.. PF § 7.8.56)

        LCI(L) 789, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 789 (../../.. PF 6-7.45 Balikpapan § 17.2.47)

        LCI(L) 790, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 790 (../../.. PF 4.45 Okinawa § 28.7.56)

        LCI(L) 791, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 791 (../../.. PF 5-6.45 Okinawa § 7.8.56)

        LCI(L) 792, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 792 (../../.. PF § 8.8.56)

        LCI(L) 793, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 793 (../../.. PF § 18.9.56)

        LCI(L) 794-LCI(L) 868 à LSIL 794-LSIL 868 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 869 à LSIL 869, 52: GOLDCREST/AMCU 24 à MHC 24 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 870 à LSIL 870, 52: JACAMAR/AMCU 25 à MHC 25 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 871 à LSIL 871 (../../.. 51/53: fr. „L 9033” 56: wiet. „Tam Set” 75: fil. „Misamis Occidental” § 80/89)

        LCI(L) 872 à LSIL 872 (../../.. 51/53: fr. „L 9038” 56: wiet. „Thien Kich” 75: fil. „Seorsogon” § 80/89)

        LCI(L) 874 à LSIL 874, 52: KESTREL/AMCU 26 à MHC 26 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 875 à LSIL 875 (../../.. 51: fr. „L 9039” 57: kamb. „P 111” 17.4.74: Filipiny 17.11.77: fil. „Marinduque” § 80/89)

        LCI(L) 876-LCI(L) 882 à LSIL 876-LSIL 882 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 883 à LSIL 883, 52: KILDEER/AMCU 27, 1.7.54: LSIL 883 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 884 à LSIL 884, 52: LONGSPUR/AMCU 28 à MHC 28 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 885-LCI(L) 943 à LSIL 885-LSIL 943 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 944 à LSIL 944, 52: MAGPIE/AMCU 29 à MHC 29 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 945-LCI(L) 947 à LSIL 945-LSIL 947 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 948 (../../.. 50: indon. „Vogel” 51: indon. „Baruna” 61: JP)

        LCI(L) 949-LCI(L) 962 à LSIL 949-LSIL 962 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 963 à LSIL 963, 52: MALLARD/AMCU 30 à MHC 30 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 966 à LSIL 966, 52: MEDRICK/AMCU 31, 1.7.54: LSIL 966 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 969 à LSIL 969, 52: MINIVET/AMCU 32, 1.7.54: LSIL 969 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 970-LCI(L) 972 à LSIL 970-LSIL 972 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 973 à LSIL 973, 52: ORIOLE/AMCU 33 à MHC 33 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 974 (../../.. 1.45 Luzon †10.1.45, zat. Lingayen, jap. XT)

        LCI(L) 976 à LSIL 976, 52: ORTOLAN/AMCU 34 à MHC 34 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 977-LCI(L) 987 à LSIL 977-LSIL 987 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 988, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 988 (../../.. PF 2.45 Iwo Jima 4-6.45 Okinawa 12.45 Chiny § 19.6.46)

        LCI(L) 989-LCI(L) 993 à LSIL 989-LSIL 993 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 994, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 994 (../../.. PF 2.45 Iwo Jima 4-6.45 Okinawa § 8.8.56)

        LCI(L) 995, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 995 (../../.. PF 2.45 Iwo Jima 4-6.45 Okinawa § 8.8.56)

        LCI(L) 997 à LSIL 997 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCI(L) 998, 31.12.44: LC(FF) 998 (../../.. PF 2.45 Iwo Jima 4.45 Okinawa § 28.7.56)

        LCI(L) 999-LCI(L) 1000 à LSIL 999-LSIL 1000 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 1001 à LSIL 1001, 52: PARTRIDGE/AMCU 36, 1.7.54: LSIL 1 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 1002 à LSIL 1002, 52: RAIL/AMCU 37 à MHC 37 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 1003-LCI(L) 1007 à LSIL 1003-LSIL 1007 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 1008 à LSIL 1008, 52: SANDPIPER/AMCU 38 à MHC 38 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 1009-LCI(L) 1016 à LSIL 1009-LSIL 1016 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 1017 à LSIL 1017 (../../.. 58: tajw. „Lien Chang” § 1994)

        LCI(L) 1018-LCI(L) 1030 à LSIL 1018-LSIL 1030 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 1031, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 1031 (../../.. PF 4-6.45 Okinawa § 23.4.47)

        LCI(L) 1032-LCI(L) 1051 à LSIL 1032-LSIL 1051 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 1052 à LSIL 1052, 52: SENTINEL/AMCU 39 à MHC 39 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 1053 à LSIL 1053, 52: SHEARWATER/AMCU 40, 1.7.54: LSIL 1053 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 1056 à LSIL 1056 (../../.. 5.: kor. „Chung Jin” § 1962)

        LCI(L) 1057-LCI(L) 1061 à LSIL 1057-LSIL 1061 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 1062 à LSIL 1062 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCI(L) 1067 à LSIL 1067 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCI(L) 1068-LCI(L) 1078 à LSIL 1068-LSIL 1078 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 1079, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 1079 (../../25.7.44 PF 5-6.45 Okinawa § 17.7.47)

        LCI(L) 1080, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 1080 (../../.. PF 4-6.45 Okinawa § 4.8.56)

        LCI(L) 1081, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 1081 (../../.. PF 4-6.45 Okinawa § 13.8.56)

        LCI(L) 1082, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 1082 (../../.. PF 4.45 Okinawa § 13.8.56)

        LCI(L) 1083, 20.1.45: LC(FF) 1083 (../../.. PF § 7.8.56)

        LCI(L) 1084-LCI(L) 1090 à LSIL 1084-LSIL 1090 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 1091 à LSIL 1091 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCI(L) 1093 à LSIL 1093, 52: SKIMMER/AMCU 41 à MHC 41 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 1094-LCI(L) 1097 à LSIL 1094-LSIL 1097 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 1098 à LSIL 1098, 52: SPARROW/AMCU 42 à MHC 42 (../../.. 52: NM)

        LCI(L) 1099-LCI(L) 1115 à LSIL 1099-LSIL 1115 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 1116 à LSIL 1116 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCI(L) 1117-LCI(L) 1129 à LSIL 1117-LSIL 1129 (../../..)

        LCI(L) 1130 à LSIL 1130 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCI(L) 1131-LCI(L) 1139 à LSIL 1131-LSIL 1139 (../../..)

        LCI(L) . 10.3.45: AMc(U) 10 (../../.. § 1951)

        LCI(L) . à LSIL . 52: OWL/AMCU 35 à MHC 35 (../../.. § 1958)

        à 42 LCI(M), 36 LCI(R), 86 LCI(G)

        220 okr. dla WBr. 3 okr. . arg. 6 okr. 47: chil. 6 okr. . chiń. 2+1 okr. 48,52: domin. 1 okr. . syj., +1 okr. 51: fr., 30 radz.

        7 ts, 11 tp 11,0×3,2×0,46d/0,76r/0,66d/0,91r m 1 SD. Gray, 225 KM lub 1 SG. Hall-Scott, 250 KM, 1 śr, 9 w tr, 120/7, 68/9 2 km, 36 ż lub 1 pojazd lub 4,5 tł z. 3.

        Landing Crafts, Mechanized

        26 ts, tp 13,7×4,3×0,9 m 2 SG. Kermath, 200 KM, 2 śr, 7,5 w tb, 75/7,5 2×12,7pl, 1 cz lub 100 ż lub 13,6 tł z. 4.

        Landing Crafts, Vehicles & Personnel

        8 ts, 13 tp 11,0×3,2×0,66d/0,91r m 1 SD. Gray, 225 KM lub 1 SG. Hall-Scott, 250 KM, 1 śr, 8 w tr, 850/6,25 2 kmpl, 1 pojazd lub 36 ż lub 3,7 tł z. 3.

        34 okr. à gr. 30 okr. 52-72 à wł. „MTP 9703”-„MTP 9754” 22 okr. 47: chil. 71? okr. à hisz. 100-120 okr. . tajw. 12 okr. . syj. 24 okr. . indon. 12 okr. . tur. 2 okr. . et. 7 okr. 55/73: fil. 2 radz.

        Landing Crafts, Mechanised

        23,6 ts, 52 tp 15,2×4,3×0,91d/1,22r m 2 SD., 220-450 KM, 2 śr, 11 w tr, 850/6,25, 140/11 2×12,7pl, 1 cz lub 60 ż lub 27,2 tł z. 4.

        13 okr. przed 65 à gr. 20 okr. 48: eg. 20 okr. (LCM 3 i LCM 6) 52/53: wł. „MTM 9901”-„MTM 9929” 25 okr.: hisz. 8 okr. . tajw. 4 okr. . tur. 3 okr. . pol. 10 okr. bud. dla Birmy 56 radz.

        Landing Crafts, Personel (Large/Ramped)

        6,5 ts, 8,2 tp 11,2×3,3×0,76/1,07 m 1 SD. Hall-Scott, 250 KM lub Kermath, 225 KM lub 1 SG. Superior, 150 KM lub Gray, 165 KM lub Gray, 225 KM, 1 śr, 8 w 0,3 tr, 50/8-SG, 130/8-SD 2 km, 36 ż z. 3.

        jw., lecz: dł. 10,9 m 1 SD. Gray, 225 KM lub Buda, 105 KM lub 1 SG. Chrysler-Royal, 115 KM lub Palmer, 150 KM 69 lub 145 lub 104 lub 80/ .

        24 okr. 47: pol., 10 (2 LCPL) 47: chil.

        Landing Crafts, Personnel (Nested)

        0,6 ts, tp 9,8×2,4×0,25 m 1 SG4, 60 KM, 1 śr, 10 w tb, / 13 ż z. 2.

        23 ts, 30 tp 17,1×4,1×1,21 m 2 SD. Gray, 450 KM, 2 śr, 13,5 w 2 tr, 500/10, 240/13,5 6×12,7pl2 Browning St: psd 6 rdn SO, BK z. 14.

        ts, 30 tp 17,1×4,4×1,19 m 2 SD., 450 KM, 2 śr, 13,5 w tr, 500/10, 250/13,5 4×12,7pl2 Browning z. 14.

        TD ex N Typ „Wickes” (1917-19, 1942-44)

        10 okrętów (APD 7-9, 15, 16, 19-22, 25)

        TD ex N Typ „Clemson” (1918-20, 1942-44)

        14 okrętów (APD 10-13, 18, 23, 24, 29, 31-36 proj. APD 26-28)

        TD Typ „Frederick Funston” (1942-43) kadłub „C3-S1-A3”

        7500 ts, 14750 tp 144,2×20,1×7,62/8,30 m 1 TPm Bethlehem, 2 k Babcock & Wilcox, 8500 KM, 1 śr, 17,5 w 1980 tr, / 2×127/38pl, 8×40/56pl2 Bofors, 24×20/70pl2 Oerlikon, 24 LCVP, 2 LCM(3), 1 LCP(L), 1 LCP(R), 3895 tł, 1468 ż z. 466. późn. 1×127/38pl, 2×76/50pl, 4×40pl2, 22×20pl2, 27 LCVP, 2 LCM(3).

        FREDERICK FUNSTON/APA 89 (../27.9.41/..)

        JAMES O'HARA/APA 90 (../..42/.. ‡23.11.44, kam.)

        1625 ts, 4050 tp 99,9×15,3×0,76d/1,85r/1,19d/3,00r m 2 SD12V, 1800 KM, 2 śr, 12,1 w 607 tr, 24000/9, 19000/10 7×40/56pl2×2,3×1 Bofors (cz. 8×40pl2×2,4×1), 12×20/70pl Oerlikon 20 cz, 163 ż z. 60/111.

        LST 2 (../19.9.42/.. 11.42 Płn. Afr. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 29.11.44: br. bzn 13.4.46: USA)

        LST 3 (../19.9.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 8.44 Płd. Fr. 24.12.44: br. bzn 12.5.46: USA)

        LST 4 (../9.10.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 1.44 Anzio 8.44 Płd. Fr. 24.12.44: br. bzn 46: USA)

        LST 5 (../3.10.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 18.11.44: br. bzn § 19.2.46 s† Zat. Bengalska)

        (LST 8) (../29.10.42/- 23.3.43: br. bzn 4.5.46: USA)

        (LST 9) (../14.11.42/- 20.3.43: br. bzn 4.5.46: USA)

        LST 10 (../../.. . OWOD „Achelous”/ARL 1 - pn.)

        (LST 11) (../18.11.42/- 23.3.43: br. bzn 13.4.46: USA)

        (LST 12) (../7.12.42/- 26.3.43: br. bzn 5.1.46: USA)

        (LST 13) (../5.1.43/- 3.4.43: br. bzn 31.12.43: ONL „FDT 13” ?)

        LST 14 (../../.. . OBŚ „Varuna”/AGP 5 - pn.)

        LST 15 (../../.. . OW „Phaon”/ARB 3 - pn.)

        LST 33 (../../.. 18.8.43: gr. „Lesbos” b†6.1.44, koło Bizerty)

        LST 35 (../../.. 18.8.43: gr. „Lemnos” § 1977)

        LST 36 (../../.. 18.8.43: gr. „Samos” § 1977)

        LST 37 (../../.. 18.8.43: gr. „Chios” § 1977)

        LST 43 (../../.. k†21.5.44, Pearl Harbor, ekspl.)

        LST 47 (../../.. 13.9.76: fil. „Tarlac” ? 90/94)

        LST 52 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LST 53, . APL 59 (../../.. 55: kor. JP „Jung Su” §)

        (LST 62) (../23.11.42/- 4.3.43: br. bzn 10.6.46: USA)

        (LST 63) (../19.12.42/- 29.3.43: br. bzn 17.12.45: USA)

        (LST 64) (../8.1.43/- 2.4.43: br. bzn b‡26.2.44, koło Neapolu 15.10.45: USA)

        (LST 65) (../7.12.42/- 18.3.43: br. bzn 5.1.46: USA)

        LST 69 (../../.. k†21.5.44, Pearl Harbor, ekspl.)

        LST 76 (../14.4.43/.. 8.44 Płd. Fr. 24.12.44: br. bzn 23.4.46: USA)

        LST 77 (../21.4.43/.. 8.44 Płd. Fr. 24.12.44: br. bzn 12.5.46: USA)

        (LST 79) (../8.5.43/- 17.7.43: br. bzn †30.9.43, Ajaccio, Korsyka, nm. sam., 1 tl)

        (LST 80) (../18.5.43/- 19.7.43: br. bzn †20.3.45, koło Antwerpii, 2 min)

        (LST 81) (../28.5.43/- 30.7.43: br. bzn . „LSE 1” § 21.5.46)

        (LST 82) (../9.6.43/- 2.8.43: br. bzn 2.9.43: „LSE 2” § 21.5.46)

        LST 83 (../../.. . OWOD „Adonis”/ARL 4 - pn.)

        LST 85-LST 116 (rozp.? zam. an.)

        LST 132 (../../.. . OW „Zeus”/ARB 4 - pn.)

        LST 135 (../../.. . OBŚ „Orestes”/AGP 10 - pn.)

        LST 136 (../../.. . OWOD „Egeria”/ARL 8 - pn.)

        LST 142-LST 156 (rozp.? zam. an.)

        LST 157 (../31.10.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 30.11.44: br. bzn 13.4.46: USA)

        (LST 159) (../21.11.42/- 4.3.43: br. bzn 23.4.46: USA)

        (LST 160) (../30.11.42/- 10.3.43: br. bzn 4.5.46: USA)

        (LST 161) (../7.12.42/- 16.3.43: br. bzn 5.1.46: USA)

        (LST 162) (../3.2.43/- 25.3.43: br. bzn 1.2.46: USA)

        (LST 163) (../4.2.43/- 1.4.43: br. bzn § 15.2.46)

        (LST 164) (../5.2.43/- 5.4.43: br. bzn § 8.2.46)

        (LST 165) (../2.2.43/- 7.4.43: br. bzn 20.3.46: USA)

        LST 167 (../../.. †25.9.43, koło Vella Lavella, jap. sam., bl)

        LST 173 (../24.4.43/.. 8.44 Płd. Fr. 24.12.44: br. bzn 23.4.46: USA)

        LST 177 (../../.. 49/51: fr. „Laita” 62: OB)

        LST 178 (../23.5.43/.. 8.44 Płd. Fr. 24.12.44: br. bzn ‡21.1.45, koło Patras, 2 miny § 28.5.45)

        LST 179 (../../.. k†21.5.44, Pearl Harbor, ekspl.)

        (LST 180) (../3.6.43/- 9.7.43: br. bzn 17.12.45: USA)

        LST 187 (../../.. 50: eg. „Aka” s†1.11.56, jez. Timsah, Kan. Sueski, blokada ↑ 2.57 sb†)

        (LST 198) (../17.1.43/- 6.3.43: br. bzn § 23.1.46)

        (LST 199) (../7.2.43/- 20.3.43: br. bzn § 29.3.46)

        (LST 200) (../20.2.43/- 29.3.43: br. bzn 27.2.46: USA)

        LST 203 (../../.. b†2.10.43, Nanumea, W. Ellice, rafa)

        (LST 214) (../22.6.43/- 13.7.43: br. bzn 26.1.46: USA)

        (LST 215) (../26.6.43/- 20.7.43: br. bzn 6.45: „LSE(LC) 51” § 27.7.46)

        (LST 216) (../4.7.43/- 4.8.43: br. bzn 13.2.44: ONL „FDT 216” †7.7.44, koło Barfleur, nm. sam., 1 tl)

        (LST 217) (../13.7.43/- 7.8.43: br. bzn 13.2.44: ONL „FDT 217” § 16.4.46)

        LST 218 (../../.. wyp. 5.55: kor. „Bi Bong”)

        LST 220 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LST 222 (../../.. 15.7.72: fil. „Mindoro Occidental” ? 90/94)

        LST 223 (../../.. 49/51: fr. „Rance” § 57/62)

        LST 227 (../../.. 3.55: kor. „Duk Bong” b‡89 § 1989)

        LST 230 (../../.. 13.9.76: fil. „Laguna”)

        LST 231 (../../.. . OWOD „Atlas”/ARL 7 - pn.)

        LST 232-LST 236 (rozp.? zam. an.)

        (LST 237) (../8.6.43/- 12.7.43: br. bzn 16.3.46: USA)

        (LST 238) (../13.6.43/- 16.7.43: br. bzn 12.2.46: USA)

        (LST 239) (../18.6.43/- 19.7.43: br. bzn 4.2.46: USA)

        LST 248-LST 260 (rozp.? zam. an.)

        LST 276 (../../.. 6.74: sing. bez nazwy sprz. . JMH)

        LST 277 (../../.. 73: chil. „Comandante Toro” § 1977)

        LST 279 (../../.. 6.60: tajw. „Chung Chih” § 1978)

        LST 280 (../26.9.43/.. 6.44 Normandia ‡7.44, nm. ŚT, 1 t 26.10.44: br. bzn napr. 8.7.44-18.1.45 § 13.4.46)

        LST 283 (../../.. sprz. . m/s „Rawhiti” sprz. 51: per. OD „Chimbote” § 1984)

        LST 287 (../../.. 13.9.76: fil. „Samar Oriental” ? 90/94)

        LST 288, . BERKSHIRE COUNTY/LST 288 (../../.. 3.56: kor. „Kae Bong”)

        LST 289 (../21.11.43/.. ‡28.4.44, zat. Lyme, nm. ŚT, . t napr. 30.11.44: br. bzn 10.12.46: USA)

        LST 294 (../../.. 5.: syj. „Angthong” § 80/90)

        LST 296-LST 300 (rozp.? zam. an.)

        (LST 301) (../15.9.42/- 6.11.42: br. bzn 20.3.46: USA)

        (LST 302) (../15.9.42/- 14.11.42: br. bzn 5?16.1.46: USA)

        (LST 303) (../21.9.42/- 14.11.42: br. bzn 4.5.46: USA)

        (LST 304) (../21.9.42/- 30.11.42: br. bzn § 19.2.46)

        (LST 305) (../10.10.42/- 7.12.42: br. bzn †20.2.44, rej. Anzio, „U 230”, 2 t)

        LST 310 (../../.. . OWOD „Aeolus”/ARL 42 - pn.)

        LST 311 (../30.12.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 18.11.44: br. bzn z‡25.3.46, Singapur, br. „LST 3036” 13.4.46: USA)

        LST 315 (../28.1.43/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 30.11.44: br. bzn 16.3.46: USA)

        LST 316 (../../.. . OWOD „Cerberus”/ARL 43 - pn.)

        LST 317 (../../.. . OWOD „Consus”/ARL 44 - pn.)

        (LST 319) (../5.11.42/- 15.12.42: br. bzn 17.12.46: USA)

        (LST 320) (../5.11.42/- 28.12.42: br. bzn 23.4.46: USA)

        (LST 321) (../5.11.42/- 31.12.42: br. bzn 13?16.4.46)

        (LST 322) (../5.11.42/- 9.1.43: br. bzn § 29.1.45 2.8.46: USA)

        (LST 323) (../5.11.42/- 18.1.43: br. bzn § 26.1.46)

        (LST 324) (../5.11.42/- 23.1.43: br. bzn 4.5.46: USA)

        LST 325 (../../.. 29.5.64: gr. „Syros” § 2000 01: USA)

        LST 326 (../11.2.43/.. 7.43 Sycylia 1.44 Anzio 6.44 Normandia 30.11?9.12.44: br. bzn 16.3.46: USA)

        LST 328 (../../.. . OW „Oceanus”/ARB 2 - pn.)

        LST 329 (../../.. . OW „Aristaeus”/ARB 2 - pn.)

        LST 330 (../../.. 42: OBŚ „Portunus”/AGP 4 - pn.)

        LST 331 (../11.2.43/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 20.11.44: br. bzn 16.3.46: USA)

        LST 332 (../../.. . OWL „Fabius”/ARV(A) 5 - pn.)

        LST 336 (../15.10.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 18?29.11.44: br. bzn 7.3.46: USA)

        LST 337 (../8.11.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 18.11?2.12.44: br. bzn 16.3.46: USA)

        LST 342 (../../.. †18.7.43, na W od Guadalcanal, jap. OP „Ro 106”, . t)

        LST 343 (../../.. . kor. „Dan Yang” § 1959)

        LST 346 (../15.12.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 18?20.11.44: br. bzn 4.5.46: USA)

        LST 347 (../7.2.43/- 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 6?19.12.44: br. bzn 28.1.46: fr. „Vire” § 57/62)

        LST 348 (../../.. †20.2.44, rej. Anzio, „U 430”, . t)

        LST 350 (../../.. . OWOD „Chandra”/ARL 46 - pn.)

        LST 351 (../7.2.43/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 1.44 Anzio 6.44 Normandia 10.12.44: br. bzn 10.12.46: USA)

        LST 352 (../7.2.43/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 1.44 Anzio 8.44 Płd. Fr. 24.12.44: br. bzn 2.8.46: USA)

        LST 353 (../../.. k†21.5.44, Pearl Harbor, ekspl.)

        LST 356, . BLEDSOE COUNTY/LST 356 (../../.. M. Śr.43 . indon. „Teluk Tomini”)

        LST 358 (../15.12.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 1.44 Anzio 8.44 Płd. Fr. 24.12.44: br. bzn 27.2.46: USA)

        LST 360 (../11.1.43/.. 7.43 Sycylia 1.44 Anzio 6.44 Normandia 18?29.11.44: br. bzn 30.6.45: OWOD „LSE(LC) 52” § 10.6.46)

        (LST 361) (../10.10.42/- 16.11.42: br. bzn 7.3.46: USA)

        (LST 362) (../10.10.42/- 21?23.11.42: br. bzn †2.3.44, Bisk., „U 744”, 1 t)

        (LST 363) (../26.10.42/- 30.11.42: br. bzn 26.1.46: USA)

        (LST 364) (../26.10.42/- 7.12.42: br. bzn †22.2.45, koło Margate, nm. MOP, 1 t)

        (LST 365) (../11.11.42/- 14.11.42: br. bzn § 29.7.46 sprz.)

        (LST 366) (../11.11.42/- 21.12.43: br. bzn 26.1.46: USA)

        (LST 367) (../24.11.42/- 29.12.43: br. bzn 17.12.45: USA)

        (LST 368) (../24.11.42/- 4.1.43: br. bzn 16.3.46: USA)

        LST 369 (../24.11.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 29.11.44: br. bzn 15.2.46: USA)

        LST 371 (../12.12.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 18.11.44: br. bzn 16.3.46: USA)

        LST 373 (../19.1.43/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 30.11?9.12.44: br. bzn 16.3.46: USA)

        LST 374 (../../.. . OWOD „Menelaus”/ARL 13 - pn.)

        LST 378 (../../.. M. Śr.43 . kor. „?” § 1959)

        LST 380 (../10.2.43/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 18.11.44: br. bzn 13.4.46: USA . kor. „?” § 1959)

        LST 381 (../10.2.43/.. 7.43 Sycylia 1.44 Anzio 6.44 Normandia 6?19.12.44: br. bzn 10.6.46: USA)

        LST 382 (../3.2.43/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 6.44 Normandia 18.11.44: br. bzn 28.1.46: USA)

        LST 383 (../28.9.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 1.44 Anzio 6.44 Normandia 18?20.11.44: br. bzn 4.5.46: USA)

        LST 385 (../28.9.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 1.44 Anzio 6.44 Normandia 29.11.44: br. bzn 16.3.46: USA)

        LST 386 (../28.9.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 9.43 Salerno 1.44 Anzio 6.44 Normandia 30.11.44: br. bzn § 29.7.46 sprz.)

        LST 388 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TG 1.8 . kor. „Samlangjin” . „Ryong Pi” § 1959)

        LST 389, . BOONE COUNTY/LST 389 (../../.. 9.8.60: gr. „Lesbos” § 12.9.90)

        LST 391, . BOWMAN COUNTY/LST 391 (../../.. 9.8.60: gr. „Rodos”)

        LST 394 (../11.11.42/.. 7.43 Sycylia 8.44 Płd. Fr. 24.12.44: br. bzn 12.5.46: USA)

        LST 396 (../../.. k†18.8.43, koło Vella Lavella, ekspl.)

        LST 400, . BRADLEY COUNTY/LST 400 (../../.. 9.58: tajw. „Chung Suo”)

        (LST 401) (../16.10.42/- 1.12.42: br. bzn 7.3.46: USA)

        (LST 402) (../9.10.42/- 9.12.42: br. bzn 5.3.45: OWOD „LSE(LC) 53” § 24.9.46)

        (LST 403) (../24.10.42/- 9.12.42: br. bzn 13.4.46: USA)

        (LST 404) (../28.10.42/- 15.12.42: br. bzn ‡15.8.44, La Manche, „U 741”, 1 t sb‡ § 8.6.45)

        (LST 405) (../31.10.42/- 28.12.42: br. bzn ?!3.46)

        (LST 406) (../28.10.42/- 26.12.42: br. bzn 13.4.46: USA)

        (LST 407) (../5.11.42/- 31.12.42: br. bzn b‡26.2.44, koło Nisidy, sztorm § 24.4.44)

        (LST 408) (../31.10.42/- 23.12.42: br. bzn 4.5.46: USA)

        (LST 409) (../15.11.42/- 6.1.43: br. bzn § 2.45 2.8.46: USA)

        (LST 410) (../15.11.42/- 14.1.43: br. bzn 16.3.46: USA)

        (LST 411) (../9.11.42/- 8.1.43: br. bzn ‡31.12.43, koło Maddaleny, Korsyka, 1 mina § 31.12.43)

        (LST 412) (../16.11.42/- 27.1.43: br. bzn 23.1.46: USA)

        (LST 413) (../10.11.42/- 6.1.43: br. bzn 13.4.46: USA)

        (LST 414) (../21.11.42/- 20.1.43: br. bzn ‡15.8.43, koło Bizerty, nm. lub wł. sam., 1 tl sb‡ §§)

        (LST 415) (../21.11.42/- 19.1.43: br. bzn ‡16.1.45, La Manche, nm. ŚT, 1 t § 17.2.45 §§ 1947)

        (LST 416) (../30.11.42/- 5.2.43: br. bzn 12.2.46: USA)

        (LST 417) (../24.11.42/- 1.2.43: br. bzn 31.5.46: USA)

        (LST 418) (../30.11.42/- 1.2.43: br. bzn †16.2.44, koło Anzio, „U 230”, 2 t)

        (LST 419) (../30.11.42/- 9.2.43: br. bzn 4.5.46: USA)

        (LST 420) (../5.12.42/- 16.2.43: br. bzn †7.11.44, koło Ostendy, 1 mina)

        (LST 421) (../5.12.42/- 27.1.43: br. bzn 8.2.46: USA)

        (LST 422) (../10.12.42/- 5.2.43: br. bzn †26.1.44, koło Anzio, 1 mina)

        (LST 423) (../14.1.43/- 25.2.43: br. bzn 10.6.46: USA)

        (LST 424) (../12.12.42/- 1.2.43: br. bzn ‡30.7.43, koło Sousse, 1 mina nie napr. 7.1.46: USA)

        (LST 425) (../12.12.42/- 11.2.43: br. bzn 16.7.45: OWOD „LSE(LC) 50” 30.8.46: USA)

        (LST 426) (../11.12.42/- 17.2.43: br. bzn 23.4.46: USA)

        (LST 427) (../19.12.42/- 16.2.43: br. bzn 13.4.46: USA)

        (LST 428) (../22.12.42/- 10.2.43: br. bzn 10.6.46: USA)

        (LST 429) (../11.1.43/- 21.2.43: br. bzn k†3.7.43, na trasie Sousse-Sfax, pożar i ekspl.)

        (LST 430) (../31.12.42/- 21.2.43: br. bzn 26.1.46: USA)

        LST 431-LST 444 (rozp.? zam. an.)

        LST 447 (../../.. †6.4.45, Okinawa, kam.)

        LST 448 (../../.. †5.10.43, koło Bougainville, jap. sam., bl)

        LST 455 (../../.. . OWOD „Achilles”/ARL 41 - pn.)

        LST 460 (../../.. †21.12.44, koło Mindoro, kam.)

        LST 472 (../../.. †15.12.44, koło Mindoro, kam.)

        LST 480 (../../.. k†21.5.44, Pearl Harbor, ekspl.)

        LST 488 (../../.. 7.72: fil. „Surigao del Norte” ? 90/94)

        LST 489 (../../.. . OWOD „Amycus”/ARL 2 - pn.)

        LST 490 (../../.. . OWOD „Agenor”/ARL 3 - pn.)

        LST 491 (../../.. 13.9.76: fil. „Lanao del Sur” ? 90/94)

        LST 492 (../../.. . kor. „An Tong” b†24.1.52 §§)

        LST 503 (../../.. 6.60: tajw. „Chung Kuang”)

        LST 507 (../../.. †28.4.44, zat. Lyme, nm. ŚT, . t)

        LST 508 (../../.. 49/51: fr. „Orne” § 57/62)

        LST 509, . BULLOCK COUNTY/LST 509 (../../.. 70: wiet. „Qui Nhon”)

        jw., lecz: 1653 ts, 4080 tp. 963 1985: ts, 3960 tp 4 wpkpl Stinger (..), 8×40pl4, 6×12,7pl, 2 LCVP rn z. 200.

        LST 512, . BURNETT COUNTY/LST 512 (../../.. sprz. 57: per. „Paita” § 1983)

        LST 513 (../../.. . OWOD „Endymion”/ARL 9 - pn.)

        LST 514 (../../.. . OW „Midas”/ARB 5 - pn.)

        LST 515, . CADDO PARISH/LST 515 (../../.. . fil. „Bataan” . „Maquindanao”)

        LST 518 (../../.. . OW „Nestor”/ARB 6 - pn.)

        LST 520 (../../.. 9.58: tajw. „Chung Shu” § 1993)

        LST 529, . CAYUGA COUNTY/LST 529 (../../.. 63: wiet. „Thi Nai”)

        LST 531 (../../.. †28.4.44, zat. Lyme, nm. ŚT, . t)

        LST 532 (../../.. 6.74: sing. bez nazwy sprz. . JMH)

        LST 533, . CHEBOYGAN COUNTY/LST 533 (../../.. 10.62 Kuba)

        LST 534 (../../.. ‡22.6.45, Okinawa, jap. sam., bl)

        LST 535 (../../.. 9.58: tajw. „Chung Wan” § 1993)

        LST 537 (../../.. 3.46 chiń. „Chung Ting” 49: tajw. bzn § 1993)

        LST 538 (../5.1.44/.. 26.10.44: br. bzn 16.3.46: USA)

        LST 545 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LST 546 (../../.. 15.7.72: fil. „Surigao del Sur” ? 90/94)

        LST 557 (../../.. 3.46 chiń. „Chung Hsing” 49: tajw. bzn)

        LST 562 (../../.. 7.70: indon. „Teluk Kau”)

        LST 566 (../../.. 13.9.76: fil. „Lanao del Norte”)

        LST 574 (../../.. 3.59: tajw. „Chung Yung”)

        LST 577 (../../.. †11.2.45, na E od Mindanao, jap. OP „Ro 50”, . t)

        LST 578 (../../.. 9.58: tajw. „Chung Pang”)

        LST 595 (../../.. . kor. „Chochiwan” . „Chon Po” § 1959)

        LST 601, . CLARKE COUNTY/LST 601 (../../.. 6.61: indon. „Teluk Salek”)

        LST 602, . CLEARWATER COUNTY/LST 602 (../../.. 25.5.72: meks. OR „Manzanillo” 94: „Rio Papaloapan”)

        LST 603, . COCHINO COUNTY/LST 603 (../../.. 69: wiet. „Vung Tau”)

        LST 604 (../../.. . OBŚ „Silenus”/AGP 11 - pn.)

        LST 607 (../../.. 13.9.76: fil. „Leyte del Sur” ? 90/94)

        LST 608 (../../.. . kor. „Ulsan” § 1959)

        LST 613 (../../.. . sing. „Persistence” § 1992)

        LST 616 (../../.. 6.61: indon. „Teluk Bajur”)

        LST 623 (../../.. . sing. „Perseverance” § 1992)

        LST 629 (../../.. . sing. „Excellence”)

        LST 644 (../../.. . OWL „Megara”/ARV(A) 6 - pn.)

        LST 645 (../../.. . OWOD „Minerva”/ARL 47 - pn.)

        LST 649 (../../.. . sing. „Resolution” § 1992)

        LST 650 (../../.. . OWOD „Numitor”/ARL 17 - pn.)

        LST 657 (../../.. 3.60: indon. „Teluk Manado” § 1983)

        LST 659 (../../.. . kor. „Chong Ho” . „Ryong Hwa” § 1959)

        LST 661 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LST 675 (../../.. b‡4.4.45, koło Okinawy, rafa § 25.8.45)

        LST 689, . DAGGETT COUNTY/LST 689 (../../.. 1.4.61: jap. „Oosumi” § 1974 . fil. „Davao Oriental” ? 90/94)

        LST 692 (../../.. 51 Korea 13.9.76: fil. „Benguet”)

        LST 700 (../../.. ‡12 i 21.1.45, 1+1 kam.)

        LST 716 (../../.. 6.46 chiń. „Chung Chien” 49: tajw. bzn)

        LST 722, . DODGE COUNTY/LST 722 (../../.. 10.62 Kuba 17.12.75: syj. „Prathong”)

        LST 728 (../../.. 50 Korea b†15.9.50, koło Inchon)

        LST 732 (../../.. 3.46 chiń. „Chung Shun” 49: tajw. bzn)

        LST 735, . DUKES COUNTY/LST 735 (../../.. wyp. 5.57: tajw. „Chung Hsi” . „Kao Hsiung” sprz. 11.74)

        LST 738 (../../.. †15.12.44, koło Mindoro, kam.)

        LST 749 (../../.. †21.12.44, koło Mindoro, kam.)

        LST 750 (../../.. †28.12.44, koło Negros, jap. sam., bl)

        LST 755 (../../.. 4.46 chiń. „Chung Hai” 49: tajw. bzn)

        LST 758, . DUVAL COUNTY/LST 758 (../../.. 10.62 Kuba)

        LST 773 (../../.. . OBŚ „Antigone”/AGP 16 - pn.)

        LST 786, . AGP 786 (../../.. . OBŚ . fil. „Kalinga Apayao”)

        LST 799, . GREER COUNTY/LST 799 (../../.. 50 Korea b‡15.9.50, koło Inchon napr. .. sprz. 61: nm. „Bamberg” §§ 15.7.70)

        LST 805 (../../.. . kor. „Lyung Hwa” § 1959)

        LST 808 (../../.. ‡20.5.45, rej. Okinawy, kam. b‡ rafa nie napr.)

        LST 815 (../../.. 49/51: fr. „Odet” § 69/70)

        LST 817 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TG 1.3)

        LST 821, . HARNETT COUNTY/AGP 821, . MY THO, . DUMAGAT (../../.. . OBŚ . fil. „Sierra Madre”)

        LST 822, . HARRIS COUNTY/LST 822 (../../.. 13.9.76: fil. „Aurora” ? 90/94)

        LST 824, . HENRY COUNTY/LST 824 (../../.. sprz. 7.10.76: mal. „Sri Banggi” 92: JP)

        LST 825, . HICKMAN COUNTY/LST 825 (../../.. . fil. „Cagayan” ? 90/94)

        LST 835, . HILLSDALE COUNTY/LST 835 (../../.. 1.4.61: jap. „Shimokita” § 1975 . fil. „Cavite” ? 90/94)

        LST 836, . HOLMES COUNTY/LST 836 (../../.. wyp. 1.7.71: sing. „Endurance” sprz. 5.12.75)

        LST 838, . HUNTERDON COUNTY/AGP 838 (../../.. . OBŚ wyp. 1.1.71: mal. „Sri Langkawi” sprz. 1.8.74 §§ 198.)

        LST 839, . IREDELL COUNTY/LST 839 (../../.. 6.61: indon. „Teluk Bone”)

        LST 840, . IRON COUNTY/LST 840 (../../.. 7.58: tajw. „Chung Fu”)

        LST 848, . JEROME COUNTY/LST 848 (../../.. 70: wiet. „Nha Trang” . fil. „Agusan del Sur” ? 90/94)

        LST 849, . JOHNSON COUNTY/LST 849 (../../.. 1.59: kor. „Wee Bong”)

        LST 852 (../../.. . OWOD „Romulus”/ARL 22 - pn.)

        LST 853, . KANE COUNTY/LST 853 (../../.. 12.58: kor. „Su Yong”)

        LST 858 (../../.. . OWOD „Satyr”/ARL 23 - pn.)

        LST 859, . LAFAYETTE COUNTY/LST 859 (../../.. 8.58: tajw. „Chung Cheng” § 1989)

        LST 860 (../../.. 49/51: fr. „Adour” ‡195. ↑: JP)

        LST 861 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TG 1.8)

        LST 871 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.7)

        LST 874 (../../.. 49/51: fr. „Ch‚liff” § 69/70)

        LST 875 (../../.. . fil. „Misamis Oriental”)

        LST 881 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TG 1.3)

        LST 884 (../../.. ‡1.4.45, Okinawa, 1 kam.)

        LST 887, . LAWRENCE COUNTY/LST 887 (../../.. . indon. „Tandjung Nusanie” § 1974)

        LST 898, . LINCOLN COUNTY/LST 898 (../../.. 8.62: syj. „Chang”)

        LST 900, . LYNN COUNTY/LST 900 (../../.. 12.58: kor. „Buk Han”)

        LST 905, . MADERA COUNTY/LST 905 (../../.. . fil. „Ilicos Norte” ? 90/94)

        LST 912, . MAHNOMEN COUNTY/LST 912 (../../.. ‡7.1.45, zat. Lingayen, kam. i ekspl. amunicji napr.)

        LST 938, . MARICOPA COUNTY/LST 938 (../../.. 62: wiet. „Da Nang”)

        LST 948 (../../.. . OWOD „Minos”/ARL 14 - pn.)

        LST 954 (../../.. . OWOD „Myrmidon”/ARL 16 - pn.)

        LST 956 (../../.. . OW „Sarpedon”/ARB 7 - pn.)

        LST 957 (../../.. . OWOD „Stentor”/ARL 26 - pn.)

        LST 962 (../../.. . OWOD „Proserpine”/ARL 21 - pn.)

        LST 963 (../../.. . OWOD „Sphinx”/ARL 24 - pn.)

        LST 966 (../../.. . OBŚ „Callisto”/AGP 15 - pn.)

        LST 967 (../../.. . OW „Ulysses”/ARB 9 - pn.)

        LST 971 (../../.. . OWOD „Krishna”/ARL 38 - pn.)

        LST 973 (../../.. 49/51: fr. „Golo” § 57/62)

        LST 975, . MARION COUNTY/LST 975 (../../.. 62: wiet. „Cam Ranh” . fil. „Zamboanga del Sur”)

        LST 976 (../../.. . OW „Telamon”/ARB 8 - pn.)

        LST 977 (../../.. . OBŚ „Alecto”/AGP 14 - pn.)

        LST 987, . MILLARD COUNTY/LST 987 (../../.. sprz. 61: nm. §§)

        LST 989 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.7)

        LST 1003 (../../.. . OWOD „Coronis”/ARL 10 - pn.)

        LST 1010 (../../.. wyp. 2.55: kor. „Un Bong”)

        LST 1017 (../../.. 12.46 chiń. „Chung Chi” 49: tajw. bzn § 1993)

        LST 1021 (../16.5.44/.. 24.12.44: br. bzn 8.2.46: USA)

        LST 1030 (../../.. 2.48 chiń. „Chung Chuan” 49: tajw. bzn)

        LST 1033 (../../.. 12.47 chiń. „Chung Sheng” 49: tajw. bzn)

        LST 1036 (../../.. . OWOD „Creon”/ARL 11 - pn.)

        LST 1037 (../../.. . OWOD „Poseidon”/ARL 12 - pn.)

        LST 1041, . MONTGOMERY COUNTY/LST 1041 (../../.. sprz. 61: nm. §§)

        LST 1050 (../../.. 1.47 chiń. „Chung Lien” 49: tajw. bzn § 1993)

        LST 1064, . NANSEMOND COUNTY/LST 1064 (../../.. 1.4.61: jap. „Shiretoko” 76: USA sprz. 24.10.77: fil. „Samar del Norte”)

        LST 1069, . ORLEANS PARISH/LST 1069, 19.1.59: MCS 6, 1.6.65: LST 1069 (../../.. 10.76: fil. „Cotabato del Norte” ? 90/94)

        LST 1072 (../../.. 9.76: fil. „Tawi-Tawi” ? 90/94)

        LST 1076, . PAGE COUNTY/LST 1076 (../../.. 10.62 Kuba wyp. 3.71: gr. „Kriti” sprz. 11.7.78)

        LST 1077, . PARK COUNTY/LST 1077 (../../.. 20.9.71: meks. OR „Panuco” 94: „Rio Panuco”)

        LST 1080, . PENDER COUNTY/LST 1080 (../../.. 10.58: kor. „Hwa San”)

        LST 1086, . POTTER COUNTY/LST 1086 (../../.. wyp. 9.8.60: gr. „Ikaria”)

        LST 1089, . RICE COUNTY/LST 1089 (../../.. sprz. 61: nm. „Bochum” § 14.4.71 12.12.72: tur. „Sancaktar”)

        LST 1090 (../../.. . indon. „Tandjung Radja” § 1966)

        LST 1091, . SAGADAHOH COUNTY/LST 1091 (../../.. 10.58: tajw. „Chung Chih”)

        LST 1092 (../../- . OWL „Aventinus”/ARV(E) 3 - pn.)

        LST 1094 (../../- . OWL „Chloris”/ARV(E) 4 - pn.)

        LST 1098 (../../- . OR „Laysan Island”/ARST 1 - pn.)

        LST 1099 (../../- . OR „Okala”/ARST 2 - pn.)

        LST 1100 (../../- . OR „Palmyra”/ARST 3 - pn.)

        LST 1101, . SALINE COUNTY/LST 1101 (../../.. sprz. 61: nm. „Bottrop” § 28.9.71 13.12.72: tur. „Bayraktar”)

        LST 1110, . SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY/LST 1110 (../../.. 8.58: tajw. „Chung Chiang” § 1993)

        LST 1115 (../../- . OWOD „Pandemus”/ARL 18 - pn.)

        LST 1116 (../../- . OWOD „Patroclus”/ARL 19 - pn.)

        LST 1117 (../../- . OWOD „Pentheus”/ARL 20 - pn.)

        LST 1118 (../../- . OWOD „Tantalus”/ARL 27 - pn.)

        LST 1119 (../../- . OW „Diomedes”/ARB 11 - pn.)

        LST 1121 (../../- . OW „Demeter”/ARB 10 - pn.)

        LST 1123, . SEDGWICK COUNTY/LST 1123 (../../.. sprz. 7.10.76: mal. „Rajah Jerom” 92: JP § 1999)

        LST 1124 (../../- . OWOD „Amphitrite”/ARL 29 - pn.)

        LST 1126, . SNOHOMISH COUNTY/LST 1126 (../../..)

        LST 1127 (../../- . OWOD „Gordius”/ARL 36 - pn.)

        LST 1128 (../../.. 7.70: indon. „Teluk Langsa”)

        LST 1131 (../../- . OWOD „Askari”/ARL 30 - pn.)

        LST 1132 (../../- . OWOD „Bellerophon”/ARL 31 - pn.)

        LST 1134, . STARK COUNTY/LST 1134 (../../.. 5.66: syj. „Pangan”)

        LST 1137 (../../- . OWOD „Chimaera”/ARL 33 - pn.)

        LST 1141, . STONE COUNTY/LST 1141 (../../.. 12.3.70: syj. „Lanta”)

        LST 1143 (../../- . OWOD „Daedalus”/ARL 35 - pn.)

        LST 1144, . SUBLETTE COUNTY/LST 1144 (../../.. 9.61: tajw. „Chung Yeh”)

        LST 1145 (../../- . OWOD „Feronia”/ARL 45 - pn.)

        LST 1147 (../..45/- . OW „Helios”/ARB 12 - pn.)

        LST 1148, . SUMMIT COUNTY/LST 1148 (../../.. 2.77: ekw. „Hualcopo”)

        LST 1149 (../../- . OWOD „Indra”/ARL 37 - pn.)

        LST 1151 (..//- . OWOD „Quirinus”/ARL 39 - pn.)

        LST 1152, . SWEETWATER COUNTY/LST 1152 (../../.. 10.58: tajw. „Chung Ming”)

        późn. à OBŚ (AGP 17-20), OWOD (ARL 5, 6, 25, 28, 32, 34, 40 an. 8.45), TP (AKS 16-19 à APB), OM (APB 35-48).

        45: chiń. Chung Chien, Chung Chuan, Chung Hai, Chung Hsing, Chung Hsun, Chung Ting, Chung Yeh.

        14 okr. 5.: arg. 3? . wiet. „Outgamie County” 21.5.71: braz. „Garcia d'Avila” (§ 1989) „New London County” i „Nye County” 73: chil. 2 . per. „Chimbote” i „?” „Dukes County” i 21 okr. (7 w/wym) . tajw. 8 . kor. 1 . ekw. 9 . indon. 2 . wł. TZ.

        Landing Crafts, Tank, 49: Landing Ships, Utility, 15.4.52: Landing Crafts, Utility

        134 ts, 286 tp 34,8×10,0×0,46d/1,14r/0,86d/1,27r m 3 SD. Gray, 675 KM, 3 śr, 8 w 11 tr, 1200/7 2×20/70pl Oerlikon, 3 cz 50 t lub 5 cz 30 t lub 150 tł z. 13.

        LCT 1-LCT 7 à LSU 1-LSU 7 à LCU 1-LCU 7 (../../..)

        LCT 8 (../../.. 10.46/11.47: syj. „Mataphon”)

        LCT 10 (../../.. 10.46/11.47: syj. „Ardang”)

        LCT 11 (../../.. 10.46/11.47: syj. „Phetra”)

        LCT 12 (../../.. 10.46/11.47: syj. „Kolum” § 1984)

        LCT 13 (../../.. 10.46/11.47: syj. „Talibong”)

        LCT 14-LCT 18 à LSU 14-LSU 18 à LCU 14-LCU 18 (../../..)

        LCT 31-LCT 34 à LSU 31-LSU 34 à LCU 31-LCU 34 (../../..)

        LCT 37-LCT 70 à LSU 37-LSU 70 à LCU 37-LCU 70 (../../..)

        LCT 72-LCT 146 à LSU 72-LSU 146 à LCU 72-LCU 146 (../../..)

        LCT 148-LCT 153 à LSU 148-LSU 153 à LCU 148-LCU 153 (../../..)

        LCT 155-LCT 174 à LSU 155-LSU 174 à LCU 155-LCU 174 (../../..)

        LCT 176-LCT 181 à LSU 176-LSU 181 à LCU 176-LCU 181 (../../..)

        LCT 183 à LSU 183 à LCU 183 (../../..)

        LCT 184 à LSU 184 à LCU 184 (../../..)

        LCT 186-LCT 195 à LSU 186-LSU 195 à LCU 186-LCU 195 (../../..)

        LCT 198 à LSU 198 à LCU 198 (../../..)

        LCT 199 à LSU 199 à LCU 199 (../../..)

        LCT 201-LCT 207 à LSU 201-LSU 207 à LCU 201-LCU 207 (../../..)

        LCT 210-LCT 214 à LSU 210-LSU 214 à LCU 210-LCU 214 (../../..)

        LCT 216-LCT 219 à LSU 216-LSU 219 à LCU 216-LCU 219 (../../..)

        LCT 221-LCT 240 à LSU 221-LSU 240 à LCU 221-LCU 240 (../../..)

        LCT 243 à LSU 243 à LCU 243 (../../..)

        LCT 245-LCT 252 à LSU 245-LSU 252 à LCU 245-LCU 252 (../../..)

        LCT 254-LCT 292 à LSU 254-LSU 292 à LCU 254-LCU 292 (../../..)

        LCT 295-LCT 304 à LSU 295-LSU 304 à LCU 295-LCU 304 (../../..)

        LCT 306-LCT 310 à LSU 306-LSU 310 à LCU 306-LCU 310 (../../..)

        LCT 312-LCT 314 à LSU 312-LSU 314 à LCU 312-LCU 314 (../../..)

        LCT 316-LCT 318 à LSU 316-LSU 318 à LCU 316-LCU 318 (../../..)

        LCT 320-LCT 331 à LSU 320-LSU 331 à LCU 320-LCU 331 (../../..)

        LCT 333-LCT 339 à LSU 333-LSU 339 à LCU 333-LCU 339 (../../..)

        LCT 341 à LSU 341 à LCU 341 (../../..)

        LCT 343-LCT 361 à LSU 343-LSU 361 à LCU 343-LCU 361 (../../..)

        LCT 363 à LSU 363 à LCU 363 (../../..)

        LCT 365 à LSU 365 à LCU 365 (../../..)

        LCT 367-LCT 412 à LSU 367-LSU 412 à LCU 367-LCU 412 (../../..)

        LCT 414-LCT 457 à LSU 414-LSU 457 à LCU 414-LCU 457 (../../..)

        LCT 460-LCT 485 -> LSU 460-LSU 485 -> LCU 460-LCU 485 (../../..)

        LCT 487-LCT 495 -> LSU 487-LSU 495 -> LCU 487-LCU 495 (../../..)

        LCT 497-LCT 500 à LSU 497-LSU 500 à LCU 497-LCU 500 (../../..)

        172 okr. dla WBr. 9 okr. (LCT(5) i (6)) . chiń. 5 okr. 46/47: syj. 11 okr. . pol. (w tym: ex am.?br. LCT 2138, 2289, 2303, 2438, 2485) 17 radz.

        Landing Crafts, Tank, 49: Landing Ships, Utility, 15.4.52: Landing Crafts, Utility

        143 ts, 309 tp 36,3×10,0×1,09d/1,22r m 3 SD. Gray, 675 KM, 3 śr, 8 w 11 tr, 1200/7 2×20/70pl Oerlikon, 3 cz 50 t lub 4 cz 40 t lub 150 tł z. 12.

        LCT 501-LCT 511 à LSU 501-LSU 511 à LCU 501-LCU 511 (../../..)

        LCT 512 à LSU 512 à LCU 512 (../../.. wyp. . tajw. „Ho Hung” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 513-LCT 528 à LSU 513-LSU 528 à LCU 513-LCU 528 (../../..)

        LCT 529 à LSU 529 à LCU 529, . YFU 2, . YLLC 5 (../../.. . OR . wiet. „HQ 561”)

        LCT 530 à LSU 530 à LCU 530 (../../..)

        LCT 531 à LSU 531 à LCU 531 (../../.. wyp. 60: kor. „Mulkae 71” § 1987)

        LCT 532-LCT 547 à LSU 532-LSU 547 à LCU 532-LCU 547 (../../..)

        LCT 549-LCT 554 à LSU 549-LSU 554 à LCU 549-LCU 554 (../../..)

        LCT 556-LCT 571 à LSU 556-LSU 571 à LCU 556-LCU 571 (../../..)

        LCT 573-LCT 578 à LSU 573-LSU 578 à LCU 573-LCU 578 (../../..)

        LCT 580 à LSU 580 à LCU 580 (../../..)

        LCT 581 à LSU 581 à LCU 581 (../../..)

        LCT 583-LCT 592 à LSU 583-LSU 592 à LCU 583-LCU 592 (../../..)

        LCT 594-LCT 596 à LSU 594-LSU 596 à LCU 594-LCU 596 (../../..)

        LCT 598-LCT 611 à LSU 598-LSU 611 à LCU 598-LCU 611 (../../..)

        LCT 613-LCT 639 à LSU 613-LSU 639 à LCU 613-LCU 639 (../../..)

        LCT 640 à LSU 640 à LCU 640 (../../.. . izr. „?”)

        LCT 641-LCT 672 à LSU 641-LSU 672 à LCU 641-LCU 672 (../../..)

        LCT 673 à LSU 673 à LCU 673 (../../.. . izr. „?”)

        LCT 674-LCT 676 à LSU 674-LSU 676 à LCU 674-LCU 676 (../../..)

        LCT 677 à LSU 677 à LCU 677 (../../.. 61: gr. „Sifnos” § 91/92)

        LCT 678-LCT 699 à LSU 678-LSU 699 à LCU 678-LCU 699 (../../..)

        LCT 700 à LSU 700 à LCU 700 (../../.. wyp. . tajw. „Ho Chie” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 701 à LSU 701 à LCU 701 (../../..)

        LCT 702 à LSU 702 à LCU 702 (../../..)

        LCT 704-LCT 712 à LSU 704-LSU 712 à LCU 704-LCU 712 (../../..)

        LCT 715-LCT 744 à LSU 715-LSU 744 à LCU 715-LCU 744 (../../..)

        LCT 745 à LSU 745 à LCU 745 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LCT 746-LCT 762 à LSU 746-LSU 762 à LCU 746-LCU 762 (../../..)

        LCT 763 à LSU 763 à LCU 763 (../../.. 61: gr. „Kithnos”)

        LCT 764-LCT 776 à LSU 764-LSU 776 à LCU 764-LCU 776 (../../..)

        LCT 778 à LSU 778 à LCU 778 (../../..)

        LCT 779 à LSU 779 à LCU 779 (../../.. 59: nm. „L 7981” . „LCU 1” sprz. 19.9.68)

        LCT 780-LCT 815 à LSU 780-LSU 815 à LCU 780-LCU 815 (../../..)

        LCT 816 à LSU 816 à LCU 816 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LCT 817-LCT 822 à LSU 817-LSU 822 à LCU 817-LCU 822 (../../..)

        LCT 824-LCT 826 à LSU 824-LSU 826 à LCU 824-LCU 826 (../../..)

        LCT 827 à LSU 827 à LCU 827 (../../.. 59: gr. „Skiathos” § 91/92)

        LCT 828-LCT 848 à LSU 828-LSU 848 à LCU 828-LCU 848 (../../..)

        LCT 849 à LSU 849 à LCU 849 (../../.. wyp. . tajw. „Ho Chung” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 850 à LSU 850 à LCU 850 (../../..)

        LCT 851 à LSU 851 à LCU 851 (../../..)

        LCT 852 à LSU 852 à LCU 852 (../../.. 59: gr. „Skopelos” § 91/92)

        LCT 853-LCT 873 à LSU 853-LSU 873 à LCU 853-LCU 873 (../../..)

        LCT 874 à LSU 874 à LCU 874 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LCT 875 à LSU 875 à LCU 875 (../../..)

        LCT 877-LCT 960 à LSU 877-LSU 960 à LCU 877-LCU 960 (../../..)

        LCT 962 à LSU 962 à LCU 962 (../../..)

        LCT 964-LCT 970 à LSU 964-LSU 970 à LCU 964-LCU 970 (../../..)

        LCT 971 à LSU 971 à LCU 971 (../../.. 62: gr. „Kimolos” § 91/92)

        LCT 972-LCT 982 à LSU 972-LSU 982 à LCU 972-LCU 982 (../../..)

        LCT 985-LCT 987 à LSU 985-LSU 987 à LCU 985-LCU 987 (../../..)

        LCT 989-LCT 994 à LSU 989-LSU 994 à LCU 989-LCU 994 (../../..)

        LCT 996-LCT 1012 à LSU 996-LSU 1012 à LCU 996-LCU 1012 (../../..)

        LCT 1013 à LSU 1013 à LCU 1013 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LCT 1014-LCT 1028 à LSU 1014-LSU 1028 à LCU 1014-LCU 1028 (../../..)

        LCT 1030-LCT 1074 à LSU 1030-LSU 1074 à LCU 1030-LCU 1074 (../../..)

        LCT 1076 à LSU 1076 à LCU 1076 (../../..)

        LCT 1077 à LSU 1077 à LCU 1077 (../../..)

        LCT 1078 à LSU 1078 à LCU 1078 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LCT 1079-LCT 1089 à LSU 1079-LSU 1089 à LCU 1079-LCU 1089 (../../..)

        LCT 1091-LCT 1111 à LSU 1091-LSU 1111 à LCU 1091-LCU 1111 (../../..)

        LCT 1112 à LSU 1112 à LCU 1112 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LCT 1113 à LSU 1113 à LCU 1113 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.5)

        LCT 1114-LCT 1131 à LSU 1114-LSU 1131 à LCU 1114-LCU 1131 (../../..)

        LCT 1132 à LSU 1132 à LCU 1132 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCT 1133-LCT 1144 à LSU 1133-LSU 1144 à LCU 1133-LCU 1144 (../../..)

        LCT 1145 à LSU 1145 à LCU 1145 (../../.. wyp. . tajw. „Ho Cheng” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 1146-LCT 1150 à LSU 1146-LSU 1150 à LCU 1146-LCU 1150 (../../..)

        LCT 1152-LCT 1154 à LSU 1152-LSU 1154 à LCU 1152-LCU 1154 (../../..)

        LCT 1155 à LSU 1155 à LCU 1155 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCT 1156-LCT 1183 à LSU 1156-LSU 1183 à LCU 1156-LCU 1183 (../../..)

        LCT 1184 à LSU 1184 à LCU 1184 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.7)

        LCT 1185-LCT 1194 à LSU 1185-LSU 1194 à LCU 1185-LCU 1194 (../../..)

        LCT 1195 à LSU 1195 à LCU 1195, . YFU 33, . YLLC 3 (../../.. . OR . wiet. „HQ 562”)

        LCT 1196-LCT 1211 à LSU 1196-LSU 1211 à LCU 1196-LCU 1211 (../../..)

        LCT 1212 à LSU 1212 à LCU 1212 (../../.. wyp. 64: tajw. „Ho Chi” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 1213 à LSU 1213 à LCU 1213 (../../.. wyp. . tajw. „Ho Tsung” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 1214-LCT 1217 à LSU 1214-LSU 1217 à LCU 1214-LCU 1217 (../../..)

        LCT 1218 à LSU 1218 à LCU 1218 (../../.. wyp. 64: tajw. „Ho Hoei” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 1219 à LSU 1219 à LCU 1219 (../../..)

        LCT 1220 à LSU 1220 à LCU 1220 (../../..)

        LCT 1221 à LSU 1221 à LCU 1221 (../../.. 54: fr. „L 9086” . wiet. „HQ 535”)

        LCT 1222-LCT 1224 à LSU 1222-LSU 1224 à LCU 1222-LCU 1224 (../../..)

        LCT 1225 à LSU 1225 à LCU 1225 (../../.. wyp. . tajw. „Ho Chun” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 1226-LCT 1228 à LSU 1226-LSU 1228 à LCU 1226-LCU 1228 (../../..)

        LCT 1229 à LSU 1229 à LCU 1229 (../../.. 61: gr. „Kea” § 91/92)

        LCT 1230-LCT 1243 à LSU 1230-LSU 1243 à LCU 1230-LCU 1243 (../../..)

        LCT 1244 à LSU 1244 à LCU 1244 (../../.. wyp. . tajw. „Ho Yao” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 1245-LCT 1267 à LSU 1245-LSU 1267 à LCU 1245-LCU 1267 (../../..)

        LCT 1268 à LSU 1268 à LCU 1268 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCT 1269 à LSU 1269 à LCU 1269 (../../..)

        LCT 1270 à LSU 1270 à LCU 1270 (../../..)

        LCT 1271 à LSU 1271 à LCU 1271 (../../.. wyp. . tajw. „Ho Yung” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 1272-LCT 1277 à LSU 1272-LSU 1277 à LCU 1272-LCU 1277 (../../..)

        LCT 1278 à LSU 1278 à LCU 1278 (../../.. wyp. . tajw. „Ho Chien” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 1279-LCT 1340 à LSU 1279-LSU 1340 à LCU 1279-LCU 1340 (../../..)

        LCT 1341 à LSU 1341 à LCU 1341 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCT 1342-LCT 1347 à LSU 1342-LSU 1347 à LCU 1342-LCU 1347 (../../..)

        LCT 1348 à LSU 1348 à LCU 1348, . YLLC 1 (../../.. . OR . wiet. „HQ 560”)

        LCT 1349-LCT 1357 à LSU 1349-LSU 1357 à LCU 1349-LCU 1357 (../../..)

        LCT 1359 à LSU 1359 à LCU 1359 (../../..)

        LCT 1360 à LSU 1360 à LCU 1360 (../../..)

        LCT 1361 à LSU 1361 à LCU 1361 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCT 1362-LCT 1366 à LSU 1362-LSU 1366 à LCU 1362-LCU 1366 (../../..)

        LCT 1367 à LSU 1367 à LCU 1367 (../../.. wyp. 64: tajw. „Ho Deng” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 1368-LCT 1376 à LSU 1368-LSU 1376 à LCU 1368-LCU 1376 (../../..)

        LCT 1377 à LSU 1377 à LCU 1377 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCT 1378 à LSU 1378 à LCU 1378 (../../..)

        LCT 1379 à LSU 1379 à LCU 1379 (../../.. 62: gr. „Karpathos” § 91/92)

        LCT 1380 à LSU 1380 à LCU 1380 (../../..)

        LCT 1381 à LSU 1381 à LCU 1381 (../../..)

        LCT 1382 à LSU 1382 à LCU 1382 (../../.. 62: gr. „Kassos” § 91/92)

        LCT 1383-LCT 1395 à LSU 1383-LSU 1395 à LCU 1383-LCU 1395 (../../..)

        LCT 1396 à LSU 1396 à LCU 1396 (../../.. 1.70: chil. „Grumete Diaz” § 1977)

        LCT 1397 à LSU 1397 à LCU 1397 (../../.. wyp. 64: tajw. „Ho Feng” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 1398-LCT 1414 à LSU 1398-LSU 1414 à LCU 1398-LCU 1414 (../../..)

        LCT 1415 à LSU 1415 à LCU 1415 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCT 1416-LCT 1419 à LSU 1416-LSU 1419 à LCU 1416-LCU 1419 (../../..)

        LCT 1420 à LSU 1420 à LCU 1420 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.2.7)

        LCT 1421-LCT 1428 à LSU 1421-LSU 1428 à LCU 1421-LCU 1428 (../../..)

        LCT 1429 à LSU 1429 à LCU 1429 (../../.. wyp. 64: tajw. „Ho Chao” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 1430 à LSU 1430 à LCU 1430 (../../..)

        LCT 1431 à LSU 1431 à LCU 1431 (../../.. 9.64: irań. „Ghesme” § 198.)

        LCT 1432-LCT 1444 à LSU 1432-LSU 1444 à LCU 1432-LCU 1444 (../../..)

        LCT 1445 à LSU 1445 à LCU 1445 (../../.. . wiet. „HQ 544”)

        LCT 1446 à LSU 1446 à LCU 1446 (../../.. . fr. „L 9074” 54: wiet. „HQ 536”)

        LCT 1447-LCT 1451 à LSU 1447-LSU 1451 à LCU 1447-LCU 1451 (../../..)

        LCT 1452 à LSU 1452 à LCU 1452 (../../.. wyp. 64: tajw. „Ho Teng” sprz. 3.4.78)

        LCT 1453-LCT 1460 à LSU 1453-LSU 1460 à LCU 1453-LCU 1460 (../../..)

        LCT 1461 à LSU 1461 à LCU 1461 (../../.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1)

        LCT 1462-LCT 1465 à LSU 1462-LSU 1465 à LCU 1462-LCU 1465 (../../..)

        4 okr. 6.67: tur. „Ç 201”-„Ç 204” 6 okr. 2.6.55: jap. „LCU 2001”-„LCU 2006” 3 okr.: chil. 2 okr. 48: domin. 9 okr. (LCT(5) i (6)) . chiń. 2 okr. . „YFB 82”, „YFB 86”, . par. 4? okr. 51: fr. 2+2 62,72: kamb. 1 okr. wiet.

        Landing Crafts, Support (Large), . Landing Ships, Support, Large

        250 ts, 387 tp 48,2×7,2×1,37d/1,78r/1,45d/1,98r m 8 SDm. General Motors, 2320 KM, 2 śr, 15,5 w 76 tr, 5500/12 1×76/50pl, 4×40/56pl2 Bofors, 4×20/70pl Oerlikon, 10 wpr .. z. 71.

        LCS(L) 1-LCS(L) 3 -> LSSL 1-LSSL 3 (../../..)

        LCS(L) 4 à LSSL 4 (../../.. 51: fr. „Arquebuse” 55: wiet. „Linh Kiem” . „Le Trong Dam” †70)

        LCS(L) 9 à LSSL 9 (../../.. 51: fr. „Hallebarde” 56: jap. „Keshi” 65: wiet. „Doan Ngoc Tang” 75: fil. „La Union” § 1991)

        LCS(L) 10 à LSSL 10 (../../.. 51: fr. „Javeline” 53: jap. „Ran” 65: wiet. „Le Van Binh” †66)

        LCS(L) 12 à LSSL 12 (../../.. 53: jap. „Sekichiku” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 13 à LSSL 13 (../../.. 53: jap. „Oniyuri” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 14 à LSSL 14 (../../.. 53: jap. „Sumire” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 15 (../../.. †22.4.45, rej. Okinawy, kam.)

        LCS(L) 18 à LSSL 18 (../../.. 53: jap. „Yamayuki” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 20 à LSSL 20 (../../.. 53: jap. „Himeyuri” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 22 à LSSL 22 (../../.. 53: jap. „Nogiku” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 24 à LSSL 24 (../../.. 53: jap. „Ezogiku” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 25 à LSSL 25 (../../.. ‡3.5.45, rej. Okinawy, kam. napr. .. 53: jap. „Suzuran” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 27 à LSSL 27 (../../.. 53: jap. „Azami” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 28-LCS(L) 32 à LSSL 28-LSSL 32 (../../..)

        LCS(L) 34 à LSSL 34 (../../.. 25.7.51: wł. „Alano” § 69/71)

        LCS(L) 36 à LSSL 36 (../../.. ‡11.4.45, rej. Okinawy, kam.)

        LCS(L) 38 à LSSL 38 (../../.. 25.7.51: wł. „Bracco” § 69/71)

        LCS(L) 39-LCS(L) 44 à LSSL 39-LSSL 44 (../../..)

        LCS(L) 45 à LSSL 45 (../../.. 6.58: gr. „Plotarchos Vlachavas” § 1976)

        LCS(L) 46-LCS(L) 48 à LSSL 46-LSSL 48 (../../..)

        LCS(L) 51 à LSSL 51 (../../.. ‡16.4.45, rej. Okinawy, 1 kam.)

        LCS(L) 52 à LSSL 52 (../../.. ‡28.5 i 3.6.45, kam. napr. .. 53: jap. „Sasayuri” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 54 à LSSL 54 (../../.. 5.: kor. „Po Song Man” § 1962)

        LCS(L) 57 à LSSL 57 (../../.. ‡12.4.45, rej. Okinawy, kam. napr. .. 53: jap. „Kiku” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 58 à LSSL 58 (../../.. 53: jap. „Susuki” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 60 à LSSL 60 (../../.. 53: jap. „Keito” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 62 à LSSL 62 (../../.. 25.7.51: wł. „Mastino” § 69/71)

        LCS(L) 63 à LSSL 63 (../../.. 25.7.51: wł. „Molosso” § 69/71)

        LCS(L) 64 à LSSL 64 (../../.. ‡6.4.45, rej. Okinawy, kam. napr. .. 25.7.51: wł. „Segugio” § 69/71)

        LCS(L) 65 à LSSL 65 (../../.. 12.8.57: gr. „Plotarchos Maridakis” § 1976)

        LCS(L) 67 à LSSL 67 (../../.. 53: jap. „Karukaya” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 68 à LSSL 68 (../../.. 53: jap. „Hamayu” § 57/61 9.75: fil. §§)

        LCS(L) 69-LCS(L) 71 à LSSL 69-LSSL 71 (../../..)

        LCS(L) 72 à LSSL 72 (../../.. 53: jap. „Shiragiku” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 75 à LSSL 75 (../../.. 53: jap. „Fuji” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 76 à LSSL 76 (../../.. 53: jap. „Kaido” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 77 à LSSL 77 (../../.. 5.: kor. „Yung Huang Man” § 1960)

        LCS(L) 78 à LSSL 78 (../../.. 53: jap. „Bara” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 79 à LSSL 79 (../../.. 53: jap. „Rindo” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 81 à LSSL 81 (../../.. 5.: kor. „Yung Il Man” § 1962)

        LCS(L) 82 à LSSL 82 (../../.. 53: jap. „Yamagiku” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 83 à LSSL 83 (../../.. 53: jap. „Hinagiku” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 84 à LSSL 84 (../../.. 53: jap. „Sawagiku” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 85 à LSSL 85 (../../.. 53: jap. „Tsuta” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 87 à LSSL 87 (../../.. 53: jap. „Hamagiku” § 57/61 11.75: fil. §§)

        LCS(L) 88 à LSSL 88 (../../.. 53: jap. „Ajisai” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 89 à LSSL 89 (../../.. 53: jap. „Hasu” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 90 à LSSL 90 (../../.. 53: jap. „Shida” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 91 à LSSL 91 (../../.. 5.: kor. „Kang Hwa Man” § 1960)

        LCS(L) 94 à LSSL 94 (../../.. 53: jap. „Suiren” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 96 à LSSL 96 (../../.. 53: jap. „Shobu” § 57/61 65: wiet. „Nguyen Ngoc Long” 17.11.75: fil. „Sulu” § 1991)

        LCS(L) 98 à LSSL 98 (../../.. 53: jap. „Aio” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 100 à LSSL 100 (../../.. 53: jap. „Akane” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 101 à LSSL 101 (../../.. 53: jap. „Tsutsuji” § 57/61 . wiet. „Lulu Phu Tho” 75: fil. na cz. zamienne)

        LCS(L) 102 à LSSL 102 (../../.. 53: jap. „Himawari” § 57/61 10.66: syj. „Naka”)

        LCS(L) 103 à LSSL 103 (../../.. 53: jap. „Yagaruma” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 104 à LSSL 104 (../../.. 53: jap. „Yuri” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 105 à LSSL 105 (../../.. 51: fr. „Framée” 55: wiet. „No Than” . „Nguyen Van Tru” †70)

        LCS(L) 106 à LSSL 106 (../../.. 53: jap. „Isogiku” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 109 à LSSL 109 (../../.. 53: jap. „Kanna” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 110 à LSSL 110 (../../.. 53: jap. „Fuyo” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 111-LCS(L) 113 à LSSL 111-LSSL 113 (../../..)

        LCS(L) 114 à LSSL 114 (../../.. 53: jap. „Hiiragi” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 115 à LSSL 115 (../../.. 53: jap. „Ayame” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 116 à LSSL 116 (../../.. ‡15 i 16.4.45, ?+1 kam., 12† napr. .. 53: jap. „Yamabuki” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 118 à LSSL 118 (../../.. 25.7.51: wł. „Spinone” § 69/71)

        LCS(L) 119 à LSSL 119 (../../.. 53: jap. „Kikyo” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 120 à LSSL 120 (../../.. 53: jap. „Iwagiku” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 122 à LSSL 122 (../../.. ‡11.6.45, kam.)

        LCS(L) 123-LCS(L) 125 à LSSL 123-LSSL 125 (../../..)

        LCS(L) 126 à LSSL 126 (../../.. 53: jap. „Renge” § 57/61)

        LCS(L) 127 à LSSL 127 (../../.. †43/45)

        LCS(L) 129 à LSSL 129 (../../.. 53: jap. „Botan” § 57/61 66: wiet. „Nguyen Duc Bong” 17.11.75: fil. „Camarines Sur” § 1991)

        LCS(L) 130 à LSSL 130 (../../.. 53: jap. „Hagi” § 57/61)

        Landing Crafts, Support (Small)

        9,8 ts, tp 11,2×3,3×1,07 m 1 SG. Hall-Scott, 250 KM, 1 śr, 12 w tb, 115/12 2×12,7pl. lub 3 km lub 1×12,7pl, 2 km oraz 2×12 wpr .. z. 6.

        jw., lecz: 10,3 ts, tp 1 SD. Gray, 225 KM, 11,5 w tr, 135/11,5 2×12,7pl2, 2 kmpl, 2×12 wpr .

        TD Typ „Bayfield” (1942-45) kadłub „C3-S-A2”

        7650 ts, 16358 tp 150,0×21,2×8,08 m 1 TPm General Electric (°Westinghouse, °°?), 2 k Foster-Wheeler (*Combustion Engineering, **Babcock & Wilcox, ***?), 8500 KM, 1 śr, 18 w 1282 tr, 10450/15 2×127/38pl, 6(#10, ##8)×40/56pl2/4/3×2,2×1 Bofors (####2×40pl, 8×28pl4), 18×20/70pl Oerlikon, 24-26 LCVP, 2 LCM(3), 5500 tł, 1500 ż z. 575. 19. bez 20pl. 44,45 195.: dod. 12×40pl4. 19. rdp SPS-40, rdn SPS-10. 45 196.: swe ULQ-6. 36,44 1965: 1 śm., 1338 ż z. 435.

        BAYFIELD/APA 33* (../15.2.42/30.11.42 ex AP 78, ex „Sea Bass” AF 6.44 Normandia 8.44 Płd. Fr. 11.44: PF 2.45 Iwo Jima 4.45 Okinawa 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TG 1.3 50-53 Korea 10.62 Kuba @ 20.6.68 §§ 15.9.69)

        BOLIVAR/APA 34°°*** (../..42/.. ex AP 79, ex „Sea Angel”)

        CALLAWAY/APA 35*# (../10.10.42/24.4.43 ex AP 80, ex „Sea Mink” ‡7.1.45, zat. Lingayen, kam. @ 10.5.46 sprz. 12.9.46: ts/s „President Harrison” . Hurricane” §§ 1974)

        CAMBRIA/APA 36*# (../10.11.42/10.11.43 ex AP 81, ex „Sea Swallow” PF 1-2.44 W. Marshalla 6.44 Saipan 7.44 Tinian 10.44 Leyte 1.45 Lingayen 4.45 Okinawa @ 30.6.49 10.62 Kuba § 15.9.70)

        CAVALIER/APA 37*# (../15.3.43/16.1.44 ex AP 82 @ 1.10.68 § 1.10.68)

        CHILTON/APA 38*# (../29.12.42/7.12.43 ex AP 83, ex „Sea Needle” ‡2.4.45, rej. Okinawy, kam. napr. .. 10.62 Kuba @ 1.7.70 § 1.7.72)

        CLAY/APA 39*# (../23.1.43/21.12.43 ex AP 84, ex „Sea Carp” @ 15.5.46 sprz. 12.9.46: ts/s „President Johnson” . „La Salle” §§ 1974)

        CUSTER/APA 40# (../6.11.42/18.7.43 ex AP 85, ex „Sea Eagle” @ 24.5.46 §§ 11.9.46)

        DU PAGE/APA 41# (../19.12.42/1.9.43 ex AP 86, ex „Sea Hound” @ 28.3.46 sprz. 27.6.46: ??)

        ELMORE/APA 42# (../29.1.43/25.8.43 ex AP 87, ex „Sea Panther” @ 13.3.46 § 15.5.46)

        FAYETTE/APA 43### (../25.2.43/13.10.43 ex AP 88, ex „Sea Hawk” @ 6.3.46 §§ 15.5.46)

        FREMONT/APA 44## (../31.3.43/29.11.43 ex AP 89, ex „Sea Corsair” PF 6.44 Saipan 9.44 Palau 10.44 Leyte 1.45 Lingayen 2.45 Iwo Jima 47: AF @ 11.10.69 § 1.6.73)

        HENRICO/APA 45# (../31.3.43/26.11.43 ex AP 90, ex „Sea Darter” ‡2.4.45, rej. Okinawy, kam. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TG 1.3 10.62 Kuba @ 14.2.68 § 1.6.73)

        KNOX/APA 46°# (../17.7.43/4.3.44 ex AP 91 @ 14.3.46 § 1.5.46)

        LAMAR/APA 47° (../28.8.43/6.4.44 ex AP 92 @ 7.7.46 § 1.4.46?)

        LEON/APA 48°### (../19.6.43/12.2.44 ex AP 93, ex „Sea Dolphin” @ 7.3.46 § 2.4.46 sprz. 47: ts/s „Steel Chemist” §§ 1971)

        ALPINE/APA 92°°*** (../../.. ex „Sea Arrow” ‡17.11.44, Filipiny, kam. napr. .. ‡1.4.45, rej. Okinawy, kam.)

        BARNSTABLE/APA 93* (../5.8.43/22.5.44 ex „Sea Snapper” @ 25.3.46 § 26.3.46 sprz. 48: ts/s „Steel Fabricator” . „Reliance Dynasty” . „Grand Valor” §§ 1974)

        BURLEIGH/APA 95° (../3.12.43/10.10.44 @ 11.6.46 § 12.6.46)

        CECIL/APA 96** (../27.9.43/15.9.44 ex „Sea Angler” @ 24.5.46 § 25.5.46)

        DADE/APA 99 (../14.1.44/11.11.44 ex „Lorain” @ 25.2.46 § 26.2.46)

        MENDOCINO/APA 100 (../11.2.44/31.10.44 @ 27.2.46 § 12.3.46)

        MONTOUR/APA 101 (../10.3.44/9.12.44 @ 19.4.46 § 8.5.46)

        RIVERSIDE/APA 102 (../13.4.44/18.12.44 @ 27.4.46 § 8.5.46)

        WESTMORELAND/APA 104 (../28.4.44/18.1.45 @ 5.6.46 § 19.6.46)

        HANSFORD/APA 106 (../25.4.44/12.10.44 25.8.44 ex ts/s „Gladwin”, ex „Sea Adder” PF 2.45 Iwo Jima 4.45 Okinawa @ 14.6.46 sprz. 20.5.47: ts/s „Steel Apprentice” §§ 1973)

        GOODHUE/APA 107°°*** (../../.. ex „Sea Wren” ‡2.4.45, rej. Okinawy, kam.)

        GOSHEN/APA 108°°*** (../../.. ex „Sea Hare”)

        GRAFTON/APA 109°°*** (../../.. ex „Sea Sparrow”)

        ODS Typ „Appalachian” (1943-44) kadłub „C2-S-B1”

        A: 6660, BR: 7550, RM: 7356, C: 7549 ts, 14133 tp 140,0×19,2×7,32 m 1 TPm General Electric (RM: DeLaval), 2 k Combustion Engineering (C: Foster-Wheeler), 6600 KM, 1 śr, 16,4 w 4300 tr, 48460/12 2×127/38pl Mk 12, 4(C: 8)×40/56pl2(2×2,4×1) Bofors, 14(BR: 18 C: 10)×20/70pl Oerlikon Mk 4 2 LCVP, 4 LCPL, 2 LCPR, 2 LCC, 165 ż, 116 tr rdp SK, rdn SG z. 507+368.

        APPALACHIAN/AGC 1 (4.11.42/29.1.43/2.10.43 27.2.43 ex ts/s bzn 1-2.44 W. Marshalla 6.44: TF 53 7.44 Guam 10.44 Leyte 1.45 Lingayen 9.45 Honsiu 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TG 1.3 @ 21.5.47 § 1.3.59 §§ 1960)

        BLUE RIDGE/AGC 2 (../7.3.43/27.9.43 15.3.43 ex ts/s bzn 4.44 Hollandia 10.44 Leyte 1.45 Lingayen 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TG 1.3 @ 14.3.47 § 1.1.60 §§ 26.8.60-J.62, Portland)

        ROCKY MOUNT/AGC 3 (4.12.42/7.3.43/15.10.43 13.3.43 ex ts/s bzn 1-2.44 W. Marshalla 6-8.44 Mariany 10.44 Leyte 1.45 Lingayen 3.45 Mindanao 4.45 Tarakan 6.45 Brunei @ 22.3.47 § 1.1.60 §§ 1973)

        CATOCTIN/AGC 5 (../23.1.43/24.1.44 31.8.43 ex ts/s „Mary Whitridge” 24.1.44: AF 8.44 Płd. Fr. ‡18.8.44, nm. sam., 1 bl, 6† 20.6.45: PF @ 26.2.47 § 1.3.59 §§ 30.12.59-60, South Portland)

        ODS ex OBW Typ „Barnegat” (1941, 1943)

        TD Typ „Windsor” (1943-45) kadłub „C3-S-A3”

        7550 ts, 13200 tp 144,2×20,1×7,62 m 1 TPm Bethlehem, 2 k Babcock & Wilcox, 8000 KM, 1 śr, 17,5 w tr, / 2×127/38pl, 8×40/56pl2 Bofors, 24×20/70pl2 Oerlikon, 24 LCVP, 2 LCM, 1 LCP(L), 1 LCP(R), 3895 tł, 1468 ż z. 466.

        WINDSOR/APA 55 (../28.12.42/.. ex „Excelsior”)

        LEEDSTOWN/APA 56 (../13.2.43/.. ex „Wood”, ex „Exchequer” 11.42 Afr. Płn.)

        ADAIR/APA 91 (../../.. ex „Exchester”)

        TD Typ „Ormsby” (1943) kadłub „C2-S-B1”

        6550 ts, 12775 tp 140,0×19,2×7,32 m 1 TPm General Electric, 2 k, 6000 KM, 1 śr, 16,5 w 1380 tr, / 2×127/38pl, 8×40/56pl2 Bofors, 28×20/70pl2 Oerlikon, 26 LCVP, 2 LCM(3), 1500 ż z. 524.

        ORMSBY/APA 49 (../..43/.. ex AP 94, ex ts/s „Twilight”)

        PIERCE/APA 50 (../..43/.. ex AP 95, ex ts/s „Northern Light”)

        SHERIDAN/APA 51 (../..43/.. ex AP 96, ex ts/s „Messenger”)

        TD Typ „Sumter” (1943-44) kadłub „C2-S-E1”

        7700 ts, 13900 tp 142,9×19,2×7,09 m 1 TPm General Electric, 2 k, 6300 KM, 1 śr, 16,5 w 1235 tr, / 2×127/38pl, 8×40/56pl2 Bofors, 20×20/70pl2 Oerlikon, 26 LCVP, 2 LCM(3), 1500 ż z. 449.

        SUMTER/APA 52 (../..43/.. ex AP 97, ex ts/s „Iberville”)

        WARREN/APA 53 (../..43/.. ex AP 98, ex ts/s „Jean Lafitte”)

        WAYNE/APA 54 (../..43/.. ex AP 99, ex ts/s „Afoundria”)

        BAXTER/APA 94 (../..43/.. ex ts/s „Antinous”)

        4500 ts, 9375 tp 139,5×21,9×5,5 m 2 MPV3 Skinner Uniflow, 2 k, 7400 KM, 2 śr, 17 w tr, 7400/15 1×127/38pl, 12×40/56pl2×4,2×2 Bofors, 16×20/70pl. Oerlikon 2 LCT(3) lub 3 LCT(5) lub 14 LCM(3) lub 41 LVT lub 47 DUKW lub 1500 tł z. 254. A 1957: 6 łl Marlin.

        ASHLAND/LSD 1, 1.11.56: AV21 (../21.12.42/5.6.43 11.43 W. Gilberta @ 3.46-27.12.50 przeb. 1.11.56-7.57: OBW @ 14.9.57-29.11.61 § 22.11.69)

        BELLE GROVE/LSD 2 (../17.2.43/.. 10.62 Kuba)

        CARTER HALL/LSD 3 (../4.3.43/.. 10.62 Kuba)

        EPPING FOREST/LSD 4, 30.11.62: MCS 7 (23.11.42/2.4.43/5.1.44)

        GUNSTON HALL/LSD 5 (../1.5.43/.. 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TU 1.8.1 10.62 Kuba 24.4.70: arg. „Candido de Lasala” § 1982: pływ. więzienie)

        LINDENWALD/LSD 6 (../11.6.43/.. 10.44 Leyte 10.62 Kuba)

        WHITE MARSH/LSD 8 (../19.7.43/.. wyp. 17.11.60: tajw. „Tung Hai” . „Chung Cheng” sprz. 5.76 § 1988)

        ODS Typ „Mount McKinley” (1944-46) kadłub „C2-S-AJ1”

        Amphibious Command Ships, zm. sygnatur 1.1.69.

        7620 (*7356, **7350) ts, 12954 (*’**12781) tp 140,0×19,2×7,32/8,5 m 1 TPm General Electric, 2 k Babcock & Wilcox (°Combustion Engineering), 6600 KM, 1 śr, 16 w 4265 tr, 43948/12 2×127/38pl Mk 12, 8(W: 4)×40/56pl2 Bofors, 20(W: 18 AU,EL: 14)×20/70pl2(1) Oerlikon Mk 4 2 LCVP, 4 LCPL, 2 LCPR, 2 LCC, 336 ż, 107 tr rdp SK-2, rdn SG z. 622+441. 19. SK-2 à rdp SPS-6B. 19. 1×127pl, 4×40pl2 rdn SPS-10, rdp SPS-17, SPS-30, SPS-37.

        MOUNT McKINLEY/AGC 7* à LCC 7 (31.7.43/27.9.43/1.5.44 27.12.43 ex ts/s „Cyclone” PF 9-10.44 Palau 10.44 Leyte 12.44 Mindoro 1.45 Lingayen 3-5.45 Kerama 1-25.7.46 Bikini W.48 Eniwetok 50 Korea 13.9.50 Inchon 12.50 Hungnam 7.58 Liban 10-12.62 Kuba mod. 2.8.63-1.64 4.65 Da Nang @ 26.3.70 §30.7.76 §§ 22.9.77)

        MOUNT OLYMPUS/AGC 8 (3.8.43/3.10.43/24.5.44 27.12.43 ex ts/s „Eclipse” PF 10.44 Leyte 1.45 Lingayen z‡6.45, am. ZR „Milicoma”/AO 73 1-2.47 wyprawa antarktyczna AF 5.1.55: PF @ 4.4.56 § 1.6.61 §§ 1969)

        WASATH/AGC 9 (7.8.43/8.10.43/20.5.44 31.12.43 ex ts/s „Fleetwing” PF 9.44 Morotai 10.44 Leyte 1.45 Lingayen 4.45 Mindanao 6.45 Balikpapan @ 30.8.46 § 1.1.60 §§ 1961, Terminal Island)

        AUBURN/AGC 10 (14.8.43/19.10.43/20.7.44 31.1.44 ex ts/s „Kathay” PF 2-3.45 Iwo Jima 6.45 Okinawa 9.12.45: AF @ 7.5.47 § 1.7.60 §§ 1961)

        ELDORADO/AGC 11**° à LCC 11 (../26.10.43/25.8.44 1.2.44 ex ts/s „Monsoon” PF 2.45 Iwo Jima 4.45 Okinawa 50-51 Korea 9.50 Inchon mod. 63-64 @ 8.11.72 § 16.11.72)

        ESTES/AGC 12*° à LCC 12 (../1.11.43/9.10.44 22.2.44 ex ts/s „Morning Star” PF 2.45 Iwo Jima 3.45 Kerama 4.45 Okinawa @ 30.6.49-31.1.51 51 Korea 1-5.54 Eniwetok 3-7.56 Eniwetok @ 69/75 § 30.7.76 §§ 197.)

        PANAMINT/AGC 13* (1.9.43/9.11.43/14.10.44 29.2.44 ex ts/s „Northern Light” PF 4-6.45 Okinawa 1-25.7.46 Bikini, TG 1.3 @ 1.47 § 1.7.60 §§ 1961)

        TETON/AGC 14 (9.11.43/5.2.44/18.10.44 7.2.44 ex ts/s „Witch of the Wave” PF 4-5.45 Okinawa @ 30.8.46 § 1.6.61 §§ 1961, N. Jork)

        jw., lecz: 2×127pl, 6×40pl2, 6×20pl 4 LCPL, 1 LCPR, 113 tr z. 633.

        ADIRONDACK/AGC 15* (18.11.44/13.1.45/2.9.45 AF @ 1.2.50-4.4.51 M. Śr. 28.10.53: 4 gr. desant., AF @ 5.2.55 § 1.6.61 §§ 1961, N. Jork)

        POCONO/AGC 16* à LCC 16 (30.11.44/25.1.45/29.12.45 AF @ 19.6.49-18.8.51 10-12.56 Egipt 10.62 Kuba 6.65 Dominikana § 1.12.76 §§ 9.12.81)

        TACONIC/AGC 17* à LCC 17 (19.12.44/10.2.45/16.1.46 AF L.58 Liban 6.65 Dominikana @ 17.12.69 § 1.12.76 §§ 1.3.82)

        TD Typ „Haskell” (1944-45) kadłub „VC-2-S-AP5”

        6700 ts, 14800 tp 138,7×18,9×7,32 m 1 TPm Westinghouse, 2 k Babcock & Wilcox, 8500 KM, 1 śr, 16,5 w 1177 tr, / 1×127/38pl, 12×40/56pl1×4,4×2 Bofors, 10×20/70pl. Oerlikon, 21-22 LCVP, 2 LCM(3), 1-2 LCP(L), 1 LCP(R), 2900 tł, 1561 ż z. 536.


        The lone civilian: One Alaska war hero's unique place in history

        The headstones at Fort Richardson National Cemetery include the ranks of the deceased or, in the case of family members, the rank of the service member to whom they were related.

        But the marker at Plot A, Row 1, Grave 2 is different. That one bears only a name and date of death. No rank.

        That's because Charles Foster Jones was a civilian, the only civilian killed by the Japanese army in North America during World War II. Though he never enlisted in the military, he is honored on this Memorial Day along with the hundreds of soldiers, sailors, airmen and officers buried beneath the neat rows of white stone.

        Jones' part in the war is often mentioned in passing, but few know much about the man. One who does is Mary Breu, author of "Last Letters From Attu" (Alaska Northwest Books). Published in 2009, the book is primarily a biography of her great-aunt, Etta Schureman Jones, but also contains much information about Etta's husband, Charles.

        Klondike sourdough

        Jones was born in St. Paris, Ohio, on May 1, 1879, the son of a doctor. His mother died when he was four months old. It is said that Dr. Jones was a very strict father and the young Chawky, as the family called him, chafed at small town life.

        "Foster wanted to get away from all that," Breu said in a phone call from her home in Anderson, South Carolina. "He had a natural wanderlust."

        As soon as he could, he left Ohio to attend Puget Sound University. He may have enrolled there in 1897, but he didn't finish anything. When the Klondike Gold Rush erupted the following year, he took off for the Chilkoot Pass to join the adventure.

        At first, he sent articles back to his hometown newspaper, describing the Yukon, the price of food, his outfit, the high wages and the life of a sourdough. Then he more or less disappeared for 20 years, most likely working various mining claims, never striking it rich, but never giving up on the country either. Aside from a short trip to the Seattle area, there's no record that he ever left Alaska after he arrived here.

        While in Tanana he met Etta, a Jersey girl trained as a teacher and nurse. She'd followed her sister to the wilds of Alaska on something of a lark. When Jones saw her working at the post office, he told a friend he was going to marry her.

        They did just that on April 1, 1923, and mushed off to a trapper's cabin for their honeymoon. They were both 42.

        Breu records the Joneses' travels around Alaska in the years that followed. They were sent to one- and two-teacher schools in remote communities including Kipnuk and Old Harbor.

        A veteran of the Trail of '98, Jones was a good mechanic and fixer, essential skills in places where the mail might not arrive for months. He could read currents and run a boat through shoals, construct a house with hand tools and make a generator run on fumes. He built his own radio and earned a license to operate it.

        Letters quoted in the book reveal a couple who were devoted to each other. "Etta called Foster 'a perfect companion,'" said Breu. "'Never sick, never worried, never irritated.' He was not a type-A personality at all, but non-confrontational, calm, a born mediator."

        In 1941, they transferred to the village of Attu. Etta was the teacher and Charles' duties included sending daily weather reports, keeping the school in repair and directing band music and entertainment programs.

        On the long, stormy boat trip from Kodiak, Etta noted the military buildup in Dutch Harbor. "The whole place bristles with guns," she wrote to relatives.

        But the Joneses did not feel at risk at their post on the tip of the Aleutian Island chain, even after America entered the war. Attu was tiny and far from everything, of no strategic value -- they thought.

        It was also, by all accounts, a lovely place to live, even if the weather was extreme, with months between mail deliveries.

        One visitor described the self-sufficient village of 40 people as a "little Eden." There was no alcohol or crime. The sea and tundra supplied abundant fish, wildfowl and berries. Profits from the sale of fox furs were divided among all residents, young and old. The money bought tidy houses, fishing boats and white dress clothes the children wore to Sunday services at the beautiful Orthodox church.

        The Attuans were walking home from that church on June 7, 1942, when the war descended upon them and rent their lives forever. Hundreds of Japanese soldiers came across the hill above the village school, yelling and firing machine guns.

        "The mud was flying up from the bullets," the late Nick Golodoff told the Daily News in a 2012 interview. Golodoff, six at the time, recalled running for the shelter of an old sod building as the Imperial troops stormed into the town.

        Jones had just finished sending a weather report to Dutch Harbor when the gunfire began. "The Japs are here," he messaged before destroying the radio. Those would be the last words American authorities heard from any citizen of Attu until Japan surrendered three years later.

        Breu is not sure, but thinks Jones probably had the only heavy hunting rifle in town. None of the permanent residents would have had a reason for one. There was no big game on the island. Foxes were trapped, not shot. A few men may have had .22s or shotguns, but bows and arrows were still in use for bird hunting.

        "At any rate, there would have been no point in 40 people trying to fight an army of a thousand," she said.

        The villagers were rounded up while their homes were searched and sacked. The Joneses received special interrogation.

        "Etta wrote that they thought they were spies for Russia," Breu said. Attu was much closer to Asia and eastern Russia than the North American mainland. The Joneses had in fact heard about the bombing of Pearl Harbor via broadcasts from Tokyo.

        Amchitka Island was mentioned repeatedly by the interrogators. "She didn't know anything about Amchitka," an island 272 miles east of Attu. "Why would she?"

        The couple was separated and Charles Jones was grilled, perhaps tortured. No records remain.

        "Finally they told him to fix the radio," Breu said. "He didn't. And they killed him."

        The Japanese informed Etta that her husband had slashed his wrist and committed suicide. They brought her into the school to see the body in a pool of blood. Then, as she looked on, they decapitated the corpse.

        Attu men were summoned and ordered to bury the body without a coffin. They interred him near the church, carefully noting the position of the grave and Jones' clothing. A small bottle was placed at the head of the grave in accordance with local custom.

        To Fort Rich

        Etta was taken to Japan as a prisoner of war. For months she was by herself, grieving, in terror and utterly isolated until a group of Australian women captured in Papua New Guinea arrived. They found her hiding behind a potted plant, weeping and bewildered by the first voices speaking English she'd heard since leaving Attu.

        In years to come, she often talked about Alaska. But she never spoke of her time as a POW. For that part of the book, Breu relies on the memories of the Australians.

        The Australian women were much taller than Etta, who was "five feet if she stood on her toes," Breau said. They were also much younger than the little American who was then in her 60s. She became a surrogate mother to the group.

        The rest of the Attuans were also taken to Japan, but to a different internment facility where many died of illness and malnutrition. Nick Golodoff remembered subsisting on a meager diet of watery rice.

        In May 1943, American troops retook Attu Island in grueling combat that cost thousands of lives. Virtually the entire Japanese force was killed in the first land battle in North America involving the U.S. military and an invading foreign army since the Battle of New Orleans -- and the last such to date.

        When the war was over, the U.S. Army sought Jones' body. Though the church and every other building in the village had been obliterated, men who had buried him, Mike Lokanin and Alfred Prokopioff, led searchers to the exact spot. The exhumed skull showed damage consistent with a bullet wound to the head.

        The body was buried at Little Falls Cemetery, where American casualties from the battle were first interred. But in time, the military began the process of returning the remains to relatives. Etta was staying at the home of Breu's mother in Michigan when a phone call came from authorities asking what she wanted them to do.

        "She said she wanted him to stay in Alaska, because he loved it so much," Breau said.

        Since he had been killed during wartime while performing duties for the military, he was accorded a place of honor in the cemetery at what is now Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson.

        A book and a grudge

        Etta Jones never returned to Alaska. She died in Florida in 1965 at the age of 86.


        Conclusion

        Both Jews and Samaritans came from the ancient Israelite population. The Samaritans refer themselves as the descendants of Israelites on the other hand, the Jews consider themselves the descendants of Judah. This article has tried to discuss the difference between Jews and Samaritans from various stances.

        Craig is a full-time academic and research-based article writer from California. A trained content creator who started his career as a column writer for local magazines and newspapers. His works have been published on many renowned online platforms.


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