Information

USS Whipple (DD-15)


USS Whipple (DD-15)

USS Whipple (DD-15) was a Truxtun class destroyer that served off the Panama Canal and from the Azores in 1917, then carried out convoy escort duties and anti-submarine patrols from Brest during 1918.

The Whipple was named after Abraham Whipple, a successful captain in the Continental Navy during the American War of Independence.

The Whipple was laid down by the Maryland Steel Co on 15 August 1901, launched on 15 August 1901 and commissioned on 17 February 1903. She then joined the 2nd Torpedo Flotilla, Atlantic Fleet, serving with that unit until December 1907 (apart fro a short spell in the reserve from 5 September 1905 to 16 July 1906). She then joined the 'Great White Fleet', the force of US battleships that circumnavigated the globe, on the first stage of their voyage. This took her to the US West Coast, where in 1908 she joined the Pacific Torpedo Flotilla, based at San Diego. For the next six years she was based on the west coast, with one trip to Alaska.

In 1914 she was part of the naval force sent to protect US interests on the Pacific coast of Mexico during the same period of tensions that saw US troops occupy Veracruz on the Gulf of Mexico. She retuned to Mexico again in 1916 during the period that saw Pancho Villa raid New Mexico. Anyone who served on her between 25 April and 13 July 1914 or 17 March to 25 April, 26 June to 31 July or 14-21 August 1916 qualified for the Mexican Service Medal.

After the US entry into the First World War on 6 April 1917 the Whipple was used to patrol the approaches to the Panama Canal. This lasted until 5 July when she departed for a brief refit to prepare for distant service. She was based on the Azores for three months from 17 September, carrying out convoy escort duties alongside her sister ship Truxtun.

Early in 1918 she moved to Brest, from where she carried out a mix of convoy escort duties and anti-submarine patrols until the end of the war. On 17 April she helped rescue some of the 32 survivors from the Florence H., after that munitions ship blew up in Quiberon Bay.

The Whipple left France on 9 December and reached the United States in January 1919. She was decommissioned on 7 July 1919, as the US Navy scrapped its coal powered destroyers, and sold for scrap in January 1920.

Displacement (standard)

433t

Displacement (loaded)

c.700t

Top Speed

30kts

Engine

4 Thornycroft boilers
2 Vertical Triple Expansion engines
8,300ihp

Length

259ft 6in

Width

23ft 3in

Armaments

Two 3in/50 guns
Six 6 pounder guns
Two 18in torpedo tubes

Crew complement

73

Launched

15 August 1901

Completed

31 December 1902

Fate

Sold 1920

Books on the First World War |Subject Index: First World War


Whipple Website

Welcome to the Whipple Website! It's about people named Whipple, wherever or whenever they've lived. Be sure to visit the Whipple Database and the Whipple Genweb while you're here!

St. Mary and St. Lawrence Church, Great Waltham, England

Captain John Whipple of Dorchester and Providence was baptized here 13 Dec 1618.

St. Mary's Church, Bocking, England

Matthew and John Whipple were baptized here before settling in Ipswich MA in 1638.

Residence of William Whipple, Portsmouth, NH

General William Whipple signed the Declaration of Independence.

Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, AZ

Located on Mount Hopkins, near Amado, Arizona.

Whipple Station, Cumberland, RI

Cumberland has a high concentration of Whipples. (This station was named after Nate Whipple)


Welcome Aboard USS Whipple (FF-1062)

USS WHIPPLE (FF 1062) is the third ship of the Fleet to bear the name WHIPPLE.

The first ship named for Commodore Abraham Whipple was the DD15, a torpedo boat destroyer, commissioned 17 February 1903 at Norfolk, Virginia. She saw peacetime service in both the Atlantic and Pacific fleets, participating in numerous exercises and in patrols off the Mexican coast for which she received the Mexican Service Medal.

The onset of the First World War found WHIPPLE guarding the approaches to the Panama Canal. The latter part of 1917 was spent escorting convoys in the vicinity of the Azores. This was followed by escort duty and ASW patrols off the coast of France. The first WHIPPLE was decommissioned 7 July 1919.

The second ship to bear Commodore Whipple's name was the DD-217, one of the "four piper" destroyers, commissioned 23 April 1920 at Philadelphia. She saw active service with the Atlantic Fleet and in the Mediterranean before setting course for the Far East. The years from 1921-1925 were spent "showing the flag" as a unit of the Asiatic Fleet.

Upon return to the United States, WHIPPLE saw service in the Second Nicaraguan Campaign while serving with the Atlantic Fleet. She then visited the Mediterranean before departing for the West Coast and a twelve year tour with the Asiatic Fleet.

WHIPPLE saw wartime service in both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets as a convoy escort and member of ASW Hunter Killer Groups, receiving two battle stars for operations in the Philippine Islands and the Mediterranean, On 6 June 1945 WHIPPLE was converted to a high speed submarine target ship (AG-117), after which she served with 'the Pacific Submarine Training Command. WHIPPLE was decommissioned at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, 9 November 1945.


USS Whipple (FF 1062)

USS WHIPPLE was the eleventh KNOX - class frigate and the third ship in the Navy named after Commodore Abraham Whipple of the Continental Navy.

Decommissioned on February 14, 1992, and stricken from the Navy list on January 11, 1995, the WHIPPLE spent the following years berthed at the NAVSEA Inactive Ships On-site Maintenance Office, Pearl Harbor, HI. In 2005, preparations started for WHIPPLE's upcoming transfer to the Mexican Navy. Equipped with new boilers, the frigate lit off her new boilers for the first time since she was decommissioned on September 30, 2005. Sea trials lasted until October 2, and after completion the frigate was transfered to the Mexican Navy where she was recommissioned as MINA.

General Characteristics: Awarded: July 22, 1964
Keel laid: April 24, 1967
Launched: April 12, 1968
Commissioned: August 22, 1970
Decommissioned: February 14, 1992
Builder: Todd Pacific Shipyards, Seattle, Wash.
Propulsion system: 2 - 1200 psi boilers 1 geared turbine, 1 shaft 35,000 shaft horsepower
Length: 438 feet (133.5 meters)
Beam: 47 feet (14.4 meters)
Draft: 25 feet (7.6 meters)
Displacement: approx. 4,200 tons full load
Speed: 27 knots
Armament: one Mk-16 missile launcher for ASROC and Harpoon missiles, one Mk-42 5-inch/54 caliber gun, Mk-46 torpedoes from single tube launchers, one Mk-25 BPDMS launcher for Sea Sparrow missiles
Aircraft: one SH-2F (LAMPS I) helicopter
Crew: 18 officers, 267 enlisted

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS WHIPPLE. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

USS WHIPPLE Image Gallery:

The photo below is an official US Navy photo taken on June 4, 2000. It shows the WHIPPLE at the Pearl Harbor Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility.

The photo below was contributed by Jeffrey R. Smith and shows the WHIPPLE during her seatrials prior to transfer to the Mexican Navy in 2005.


USS Whipple (DD-15) - History

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USS Whipple (DD 217)

Reclassified as Auxiliary AG-117 on 30 June 1945
Decommissioned 9 November 1945
Stricken 5 December 1945
Sold and broken up for scrap on 30 September 1947 to the Northern Metals Co., Philadelphia.

Commands listed for USS Whipple (DD 217)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1James Powell Clay, USN11 Jun 19395 Oct 1939
2Lt.Cdr. Rupert Meyrick Zimmerli, USN5 Oct 1939late 1940
3Lt.Cdr. Charles Stillman Weeks, USNlate 1940Mar 1941
4Lt.Cdr. Eugene Simon Karpe, USNMar 194129 Jun 1942
5T/Lt.Cdr. Vincent James Meola, USN29 Jun 19425 Sep 1943
6T/Lt.Cdr. Sanford Elza Woodard, USN5 Sep 194330 Oct 1944
7Richard Norman Reeves, USNR30 Oct 19443 Sep 1945
8Joseph William Leimert, USNR3 Sep 19459 Nov 1945

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Notable events involving Whipple include:

9 Feb 1942
Around 0800 hours, HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN) and HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), were joined by eight US destroyers USS Whipple (Lt.Cdr. E.S. Karpe, USN), USS Pillsbury (Lt.Cdr. H.C. Pound, USN), USS Edsall (Lt.Cdr. J.J. Nix, USN), USS Alden (Lt.Cdr. L.E. Coley, USN), USS Stewart (Lt.Cdr. H.P. Smith, USN), USS John D. Edwards (Lt.Cdr. H.E. Eccles, USN), USS Barker (Lt.Cdr. A.J. Miller, USN) and USS Bulmer (Lt.Cdr. D.A. Harris, USN).

At 1700 hours the Dutch destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN), HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) and HrMs Van Ghent (Lt.Cdr. P. Schotel, RNN) also joined. Van Ghent developed engine trouble and was later replaced by HrMs Kortenaer (Lt.Cdr. A. Kroese, RNN). (After repairs Van Ghent re-joined the task force on the 11th.)

Around 2130 hours the US destroyers USS Edsall and USS Alden were detached and sent to Tjilatjap. ( 1 )

12 Feb 1942
At 0200 hours, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), departed the Prigi Bay on the south coast of Java. Outside the bay she waited for HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN) which had also fuelled there. While leaving the bay De Ruyter collided with the US destroyer USS Whipple (Lt.Cdr. E.S. Karpe, USN) (or it was the other way round, Whipple colliding with De Ruyter, depending on what sources one reads, Dutch or American, sic.).

At sea the Dutch cruisers made rendes-vous with the Dutch destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN), HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN), HrMs Van Ghent (Lt.Cdr. P. Schotel, RNN) and HrMs Kortenaer (Lt.Cdr. A. Kroese, RNN). The task force then set course towards the Sunda Strait.

At 1600 hours, HrMS Van Ghent and HrMs Kortenaer departed the formation and at 1830 hours HrMs Piet Hein and HrMs Bankert also left.

Both cruisers then continued their passage towards the Sunda Strait unescorted. ( 1 )

Media links


USS Whipple (FF 1062)

On 24 April 1967 the keel for USS WHIPPLE (DE 1062) was laid at the Todd Shipyard in Seattle, Washington. WHIPPLE is one of 46 Knox class ships honoring naval historian D.W. Knox. WHIPPLE was christened in the memory of Commodore Abraham WHIPPLE of the Continental Navy. Commodore WHIPPLE is credited with the firing of the first naval gun of the Revolution at a British vessel.

WHIPPLE's commissioning look place on 22 August 1970. She arrived at her homeport of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 22 October 1970. Shortly following her arrival to Hawaii, WHIPPLE was given the interesting assignment of providing support for the at-sea phase filming of a HAWAII FIVE-O television episode with Jack Lord.

In July, 1975 the designation for WHIPPLE was changed from that of an ocean escort (DE) to that of a Frigate (FF). This was done in order to conform United Stares Naval Ships size classes to that of other navies of the world.

USS WHIPPLE (FF 1062) is equipped with many varied and highly sophisticated sensors. Above the water she uses the long range air search radar AN/SPS-40. For defecting surface contacts the smaller AN/SPS-10 radar is used. The AN/SPG-53 fire control radar over the bridge is used to direct our 5 inch .54 caliber gun against ocean, shore or air targets. On top of the helo hangar is the MK-115 fire control system which guides WHIPPLE's anti-air and anti-ship missile system. This system uses the sea sparrow missile in an eight cell "pepper box" launcher located on the ship's fantail.

In the area of electronic warfare WHIPPLE uses various passive intercept sensors to detect electromagnetic emissions and is capable of using both active electronic and passive countermeasures in order to combat anti-ship missiles or any hostile platform that may threaten with attack.

WHIPPLE's primary mission is anti-submarine warfare (ASW). The heart of WHIPPLE's ASW system is the AN/SQS-26CX Sonar. This system has the ability to operate in both active (pinging) and passive (listening) modes to detect, identify and track multiple targets. To further aid the ASW effort WHIPPLE employs a helicopter hanger and night deck to accept LAMPS (Light Airborne Multi-purpose System) helicopters. LAMPS is a SH-2F Sea Sprite helicopter which has its own electronics which include radar, electronic warfare and anti-submarine equipment. The ability of LAMPS to drop sonabuoys extends WHIPPLE's submarine detection capabilities to a formidable degree.

WHIPPLE's primary ASW weapon, the ASROC (Anti-submarine Rocket), located on the foc'sle launcher, is capable of delivering either MK-46 homing torpedoes or depth charges, In addition to this long range weapon, WHIPPLE has dual torpedo tubes mounted on each side amidships for use against ships or submarines. To extend WHIPPLE's ASW delivery range, the LAMPS helicopter is equipped to carry and launch the MK-46 torpedo,

WHIPPLE is powered by a 35,000 shaft horsepower steam turbine driving a single five bladed screw. This propels the ship to a top speed in excess of 27 knots. The steam is generated by two 1200 PSI boilers. Besides using steam to propel the ship, it is also used to provide the environment. Steam from the boilers is used to generate electricity for power and air conditioning. It also provides hot water, and is used in the ship's galley for cooking. In the event of a casualty to the boiler, there are two 12 cylinder auxiliary diesels designed to provide the ship's electrical load.

The effort which WHIPPLE has put forth in serving the nation has not gone unhonored. She has been awarded the following medals and ribbons U.S. Combat Action Ribbon. National Defense Medal, Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal, Republic of Vietnam Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, Battle Efficiency Ribbon (three awards), and Sea Service Deployment Ribbon. WHIPPLE earned her Combat Action Ribbon by participating extensively during the Vietnam conflict in the area of Naval Gunfire Support and other operations in support of the armed forces of the Republic of Vietnam and the United States.

In April, 1984, WHIPPLE completed a seven month Western Pacific/Indian Ocean deployment. Nearly four months were spent conducting routine operations in the Persian Gulf while attached to Commander Middle East Force.

WHIPPLE's motto, "Resources Beyond Calculation," aptly describes the strength and broad presence of today's United States Navy. It also correctly describes WHIPPLE's crewmembers, who have proven that there is no adequate measure of determining the amount of hard work. dedication, and valor that is required to sustain WHIPPLE in either peacetime or war.


When 22-year-old Pardon Mawney Whipple of Providence, Rhode Island received his midshipman’s warrant in December of 1812, the war between America and Britain was well underway. By 1813, USS Constitution had already met and defeated, in separate battles, HMS Guerriere and HMS Java. Whipple was assigned to Constitution, then under the command of Captain Charles Stewart. He began this letterbook with the intention, as he wrote, to “take a copy of my letters which will in some future day afford to myself the gratification of reviewing the scenes of past life.”

Whipple’s letters, written to family and friends, offer a unique and intimate view of the events aboard USS Constitution during the War of 1812. He describes both the excitement and horrors the men felt during battle, as well as the protocols followed after a battle was over. Not every moment was spent fighting other ships, however, and Whipple provides a glimpse into the other activities that occupied Constitution and her crew during these times.

The letterbook begins with a missive written in May 1813, after Constitution spent several months in repair at the Charlestown Navy Yard. Whipple expressed his impatience in the letter to a friend: “…you can well imagine how anxiously I look forward to the moment when we shall unfurl our sails & launch into the bosom of the ocean, after having been kept so long in suspense, it is like emancipation from slavery, to have my name enroled on the list with this gallant crew…”

Once at sea, Constitution captured several ships, including HMS Pictou and the British merchant ship Lovely Ann, the latter of which Whipple was ordered to sail with British prisoners on board to Barbados. Eager for action, Whipple was disappointed by this assignment: “…how fondly I looked forward to the moment when we should meet the enemy…judge, then, what must have been my disappointment when I received orders to take charge of the prisoners & leave the ship at this interesting moment, where I had expected to gain so much all my hopes were blasted at one dash.” The letterbook includes a copy of the Parole of Honor, an oath taken by prisoners of war to pledge their “word and honor not to bear arms in the service of Great Britain against the United States…until duly discharged.” Whipple carried this copy with him in 1814 while delivering the British prisoners.

Whipple was detained by the British in Barbados for political reasons before making his way back to the United States. Rejoining Constitution in 1815, he was on board during the engagement with HMS Cyane and HMS Levant on February 20, 1815, and acted as a boat officer transferring prisoners of war from the former. In a letter written after the battle, he describes the grim realities of war: “…this being the first action I was ever in, you can imagine to yourself what were my feelings to hear the horrid groans of the wounded & dying, & the scene that presented itself the next morning at daylight on board of the Levant, the quarter deck seemed to have the appearance of a slaughter house…the mizenmast for several feet was covered with brains & blood pieces of bones, fingers, & large pieces of flesh were picked up from off the deck.”

Though he left Constitution on September 10, 1815, Whipple continued to write in his letterbook until 1820, during which time he served on USS Washington, USS Columbus, and USS Spark. Whipple left the Navy on September 30, 1824 due to his declining health. He died at age 37 on May 11, 1827 from tuberculosis.

Creator
Pardon Mawney Whipple

Date Created
1813-1820

Medium
Paper, Ink, Leatherbound

Dimensions
[H]12 3/4 in [W]7 3/4 in [D]1 in

Catalog Number
1994.1

Credit Line
USS Constitution Museum Collection. Norma Adams Price Gift.

Terms of Use

/>
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License


Ship's Crew

Early Life
Pardon Mawney Whipple was born to William and Abigail Whipple in 1790 in New York, possibly the 12th of 14 children. While born in New York, he was raised in Providence, Rhode Island. His father William had been an officer in the War for Independence.

Aboard USS Constitution

Whipple joined the Navy in 1812 as a midshipman and was posted to Constitution in 1813. As a midshipman, an officer in training, Whipple would have been formerly tutored in math, languages and literature, but most of his training in seamanship and leadership would have been received on the job. For his pay of $19.00 a month, he was required to do whatever was asked of him, which ranged from standing watch to supervising work crews to co-commanding a division in battle. His battle station was 3rd Division, Gun Deck, assisting the Officer in Charge.

Each midshipman was also expected to keep a journal for recording essential information and observations. In addition to his official journal, Whipple kept a letterbook from 1813 to 1821, in which he wrote copies of letters he sent to friends and family. The letterbook was passed down through his family, preserving a record of his experiences on Constitution and subsequent postings.

Whipple served two tours aboard Constitution. The first began in May 1813, after the ship spent several months in repair at the Charlestown Navy Yard. Whipple expressed his impatience in a letter to a friend:

“…you can well imagine how anxiously I looked forward to the moment when we shall unfurl our sails & launch into the bosom of the ocean, after having been kept so long in suspense, it is like emancipation from slavery, to have my name enroled on the list with this gallant crew…”

Once at sea, Constitution captured several ships, including Lovely Ann, which Whipple was ordered to sail with British prisoners aboard to Barbados. Eager for action, Whipple was disappointed by this assignment:

“…how fondly I looked forward to the moment when we should meet the enemy…judge, then, what must have been my disappointment when I received orders to take charge of the prisoners & leave the ship at this interesting moment, where I had expected to gain so much all my hopes were blasted at one dash.”

Whipple was detained by the British in Barbados for political reasons before making his way back to the United States. Rejoining Constitution in 1815, he was aboard during the battles against HMS Cyane and Levant on February 20, and acted as a boat officer transferring prisoners of war from the former. He shared with the crew $45,000 in prize money for the victory. In a letter he describes the grim realities of war, witnessed when he boarded the defeated Levant:

“…this being the first action I was ever in, you can imagine to yourself what were my feelings to hear the horrid groans of the wounded & dying, & the scene that presented itself the next morning at daylight on board of the Levant, the quarter deck seemed to have the appearance of a slaughter house…the mizenmast for several feet was covered with brains & blood pieces of bones, fingers, & large pieces of flesh were picked up from off the deck.”

Whipple left the Constitution on September 10, 1815 and served in the Mediterranean on USS Washington and USS Spark. He attained the rank of lieutenant in March 1820 and was paid $40.00 a month. In February 1821 he heroically rescued two Swedish sailors off the coast of Spain.

His second cruise aboard Constitution began October 8, 1821 from Gibraltar, as the ship sailed to protect American commerce in the Mediterranean. He went on leave from December 1821 to November 1823 due to his declining health and left for good on September 30, 1824.


Captain Abraham Whipple runs the USS Columbus aground

On this day in history, March 27, 1778, Captain Abraham Whipple runs the USS Columbus aground. Whipple was one of the most prominent American seamen of the Revolution. He grew up in the heavily shipping-oriented city of Providence, Rhode Island and became captain of his own ship in his 20s. When the American Revolution drew near, Whipple led the expedition of citizens from Providence that destroyed the HMS Gaspee, whose captain had been harassing colonial shipping in Narragansett Bay.

In June, 1775, Rhode Island created the first American navy and Whipple was given command of the lead ship, the Katy. Within days, Whipple had fired the first shot of the war at a British vessel and taken the war’s first British prize when he captured the armed sloop Diana. Soon, Congress built its own navy and Whipple was appointed captain of the 24 gun frigate Columbus. His first mission was to sale with Commodore Esek Hopkins (his cousin) to the Bahamas, where they captured a large trove of military supplies and the Royal Governor of the colony.

Whipple then sailed the New England seas, capturing British ships. Eventually, he was given orders to oversee the outfitting of two new ships in Newport and to clean up the Columbus. On March 27, 1778, the Columbus was chased by a British squadron and forced Whipple to run her aground. Whipple and the sailors escaped, but the British burned the ship. Whipple then received orders to break the blockade of Narragansett Bay to take news of the American victory at Saratoga to France. Whipple successfully broke the blockade by stealth at night and damaged several British ships along the way.

After his successful return, Whipple was given command of a 3 ship squadron. In April of 1779, they came across a British fleet of 60 ships in the fog off Newfoundland, laden with supplies from Jamaica. Whipple’s small fleet didn’t have time to escape, so Whipple ordered them to raise British flags and sail along with the fleet. By this trick, his small fleet began capturing ships one by one through various subterfuges, until 11 ships were captured! When they returned to Boston with their prizes, valued at over a million dollars, Abraham Whipple became a celebrity to the point that songs were written about him.

Congress next sent Whipple to reinforce Major General Benjamin Lincoln at Charleston, South Carolina. When Whipple arrived there, his fleet was quickly blockaded by British ships in the harbor and could not get out. When the city was captured in May, 1780, Whipple was among the thousands of Americans taken prisoner. He spent the next 2 1/2 years as a prisoner and was finally released in late 1782. After the war, Whipple sailed to London on a merchant voyage and became the first person to raise the American flag there, and on a ship with George Washington’s head on the bow no less.

Whipple made an attempt at farming in Cranston, Rhode Island, but eventually moved to Ohio with his son-in-law. They became some of the original founders of Marietta, Ohio, and lived there for the rest of their lives. In 1801, Whipple made history yet again when he sailed the first merchant ship built on the Ohio River down the Mississippi to New Orleans and on to Cuba, laden with goods for sale from the Ohio River valley. This was the beginning of a lucrative trade from the Ohio valley to the rest of the world. Whipple finally passed away at the age of 85 in Marietta in 1819.

National Society Sons of the American Revolution

“People will not look forward to posterity, who never look backward to their ancestors.”
Edmund Burke


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